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12 Places to Score Big-Ass Drinks in Portland

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Photo of Teardrop Lounge courtesy Facebook

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Is it summer yet? There are few better pleasures in life than sitting outside with a large group of friends and an even larger alcoholic beverage positioned in the center, so with all future day-drinking plans in mind, here's an update to Eater's patented large-format cocktail guide: aka the big-ass drinks map. Margarita pitchers are plentiful around town, so here's a look at 12 of Portland's vodka-filled mason jars, volcano bowls, and shared bottled cocktails that certainly shouldn't be consumed solo.

Just in case you overdo it, here's a handy morning-after guide, or conversely, if these drinks aren't big-ass enough for you, do add your favorite to the comments.


· All Previous Eater Guides [Eater PDX]

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Teardrop Lounge

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Each section of Teardrop Lounge's lengthy cocktail menu features a drink meant to be consumed by a group. Its spring 2014 menu offered the "Walking on Sunshine" (with barrel-aged cachaça, St. Germain, grapefruit, and sparkling wine), and "The Farmer’s Daughter," borrowed from Expatriate's Daniel Osbourne. Each comes in two potential sizes: one that serves four to six drinkers, and a more modest bowl that's meant for two or three. [Photo]

Hale Pele

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Blair Reynolds' volcano-themed tiki bar embraces tropical tradition with two classic shared drinks: the Boo Loo (served inside a pineapple) and the fiery Volcano Bowl (a dash of cinnamon is what teases the flame). There's also a newer classic, developed by Smuggler's Cove owner Martin Cate: The "Fugu for Two" features Orgeat, rum, peach brandy, and passionfruit.[Photo]

Interurban

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Day-drink on Interurban's back patio with a handful of friends and one of the bar's four bottled cocktails, served to share: Classic Manhattan and Old Fashioned bottles cost $45, while the Negroni and Martinez (gin, maraschino, sweet vermouth, orange bitters) bottles will set your group of two-to-four back $40.

Punch Bowl Social Food & Drink PDX

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Unsurprisingly for a restaurant with "Punch Bowl" in its name, Pioneer Place's hybrid diner/bowling alley/adult gaming complex offers four takes on the shared group punch bowl cocktail. The "Ole Uppercut" mixes bourbon with maraschino liqueur and grapefruit juice (among other ingredients), the "Paper Tiger Club Punch" combines tequila, lemon ginger tea, and a drizzle of jalapeno simple syrup. All four are available in three sizes: a solo mug, a bowl that serves four, and a larger one for parties of eight. [Photo]

Swift Lounge

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NE's Swift Lounge calls its 16-ounce cocktails "Sissies," meaning it does not play around with with its 32-ounce "Fatty" mason jar drinks. Giant masons — for $8 each — flaunt names like the "Bitchy Parrot" (habanero-infused tequila, pineapple, and orange) and "Stoned Finch" (cucumber vodka, lime, basil, and elderflower syrup). [Photo]

Restaurant St Jack

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Two of bar manager John Salas's aperitif cocktails are available by the shared bottle: The "Savoie Spritz," with vermouth, alpine liqueur, cucumber, and sparkling wine; and "L'Americain," featuring Campari, Lillet rose, and grapefruit.

Gold Dust Meridian

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The menu at SE's Gold Dust Meridian serves its big-ass drinks in "Family Bowls," with three paper-umbrella'ed varieties on hand: The "Pink Pillow" marries whiskey with citrus and ginger ale, while the "Radio Cab" is a potent mix of vodka, grape nectar, orange juice, pineapple, and Triple Sec. [Photo]

Tasty 'N Alder

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Unsurprisingly, a restaurant dedicated to family-style dining also offers a couple of shared drinks. The bar at chef John Gorham's bustling West End restaurant offers two bottled cocktails, a classic Boulevardier and the "Bravest Bull," with sherry, vermouth, apero, and Peychaud's bitters.

Rae's Lakeview Lounge

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NW diner/bar Rae's offers three "Thunder Bowls" on its menu, measuring out 61 ounces of booze for "two or more humans." Groups can order up the "Don't Call Me," a mixture of dark and light rums, gin, and fruit juices; or the "Taxi, Please," with bourbon, peach schnapps, ginger ale, and vermouth. There's also a back patio for outdoor imbibing. [Photo]

Saucebox

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Downtown's pan-Asian spot Saucebox offers its version of the two-person volcano bowl, packing its $15 drink with light and dark rum, brandy, Orgeat, citrus, hibiscus, papaya, pineapple, and passionfruit. [Photo]

Whey Bar

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Both the Whey Bar and its parent restaurant, Ox, offer the "Dirty Grandma Agnes" cocktail in a large mason jar meant to be shared among four drinkers. Named for chef Greg Denton's grandmother (specifically, her pickle recipe), it's a take on the martini with vodka, dry vermouth, and pickle juice. [Photo]

Trader Vic's

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Original tiki impresario Trader Vic claims to have invented the Mai Tai, of course the Pearl District outpost of his namesake chain offers a handful of "Party Libations" meant for either two or four. In addition to the classic Scorpion Bowl (with several rums, fruit juices, and brandy), there's the "Rum Keg" (with rums, pineapple, and passionfruit) and the "Rum Giggle," a cocktail with amaretto that's meant for a couple. [Photo]

Teardrop Lounge

Each section of Teardrop Lounge's lengthy cocktail menu features a drink meant to be consumed by a group. Its spring 2014 menu offered the "Walking on Sunshine" (with barrel-aged cachaça, St. Germain, grapefruit, and sparkling wine), and "The Farmer’s Daughter," borrowed from Expatriate's Daniel Osbourne. Each comes in two potential sizes: one that serves four to six drinkers, and a more modest bowl that's meant for two or three. [Photo]

Hale Pele

Blair Reynolds' volcano-themed tiki bar embraces tropical tradition with two classic shared drinks: the Boo Loo (served inside a pineapple) and the fiery Volcano Bowl (a dash of cinnamon is what teases the flame). There's also a newer classic, developed by Smuggler's Cove owner Martin Cate: The "Fugu for Two" features Orgeat, rum, peach brandy, and passionfruit.[Photo]

Interurban

Day-drink on Interurban's back patio with a handful of friends and one of the bar's four bottled cocktails, served to share: Classic Manhattan and Old Fashioned bottles cost $45, while the Negroni and Martinez (gin, maraschino, sweet vermouth, orange bitters) bottles will set your group of two-to-four back $40.

Punch Bowl Social Food & Drink PDX

Unsurprisingly for a restaurant with "Punch Bowl" in its name, Pioneer Place's hybrid diner/bowling alley/adult gaming complex offers four takes on the shared group punch bowl cocktail. The "Ole Uppercut" mixes bourbon with maraschino liqueur and grapefruit juice (among other ingredients), the "Paper Tiger Club Punch" combines tequila, lemon ginger tea, and a drizzle of jalapeno simple syrup. All four are available in three sizes: a solo mug, a bowl that serves four, and a larger one for parties of eight. [Photo]

Swift Lounge

NE's Swift Lounge calls its 16-ounce cocktails "Sissies," meaning it does not play around with with its 32-ounce "Fatty" mason jar drinks. Giant masons — for $8 each — flaunt names like the "Bitchy Parrot" (habanero-infused tequila, pineapple, and orange) and "Stoned Finch" (cucumber vodka, lime, basil, and elderflower syrup). [Photo]

Restaurant St Jack

Two of bar manager John Salas's aperitif cocktails are available by the shared bottle: The "Savoie Spritz," with vermouth, alpine liqueur, cucumber, and sparkling wine; and "L'Americain," featuring Campari, Lillet rose, and grapefruit.

Gold Dust Meridian

The menu at SE's Gold Dust Meridian serves its big-ass drinks in "Family Bowls," with three paper-umbrella'ed varieties on hand: The "Pink Pillow" marries whiskey with citrus and ginger ale, while the "Radio Cab" is a potent mix of vodka, grape nectar, orange juice, pineapple, and Triple Sec. [Photo]

Tasty 'N Alder

Unsurprisingly, a restaurant dedicated to family-style dining also offers a couple of shared drinks. The bar at chef John Gorham's bustling West End restaurant offers two bottled cocktails, a classic Boulevardier and the "Bravest Bull," with sherry, vermouth, apero, and Peychaud's bitters.

Rae's Lakeview Lounge

NW diner/bar Rae's offers three "Thunder Bowls" on its menu, measuring out 61 ounces of booze for "two or more humans." Groups can order up the "Don't Call Me," a mixture of dark and light rums, gin, and fruit juices; or the "Taxi, Please," with bourbon, peach schnapps, ginger ale, and vermouth. There's also a back patio for outdoor imbibing. [Photo]

Saucebox

Downtown's pan-Asian spot Saucebox offers its version of the two-person volcano bowl, packing its $15 drink with light and dark rum, brandy, Orgeat, citrus, hibiscus, papaya, pineapple, and passionfruit. [Photo]

Whey Bar

Both the Whey Bar and its parent restaurant, Ox, offer the "Dirty Grandma Agnes" cocktail in a large mason jar meant to be shared among four drinkers. Named for chef Greg Denton's grandmother (specifically, her pickle recipe), it's a take on the martini with vodka, dry vermouth, and pickle juice. [Photo]

Trader Vic's

Original tiki impresario Trader Vic claims to have invented the Mai Tai, of course the Pearl District outpost of his namesake chain offers a handful of "Party Libations" meant for either two or four. In addition to the classic Scorpion Bowl (with several rums, fruit juices, and brandy), there's the "Rum Keg" (with rums, pineapple, and passionfruit) and the "Rum Giggle," a cocktail with amaretto that's meant for a couple. [Photo]

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