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A rocks glass with a large ice cube and pale yellow drink sits on a wooden fence, overlooking the mighty Columbia river.
The Knot Bar offers a beautiful view of the Columbia
Alex Frane

Where to Eat and Drink When Visiting Gorgeous Astoria, Oregon

Seafood restaurants, bakeries, and breweries are the can’t-miss places when visiting this Oregon port town

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The Knot Bar offers a beautiful view of the Columbia
| Alex Frane

Located at the Northwestern tip of Oregon, right at the mouth of the Columbia, Astoria is a popular tourist location for its breweries, seafood, and connection to beloved childhood movies. Its storied history includes the indigenous people of the Clatsop and Chinook tribes, Lewis and Clark, John Jacob Astor, and socialist, Scandinavian cannery workers. Today its food and drink scene is booming, especially with its twin, ever-expanding (though occasionally collapsing) breweries Buoy and Fort George. The town runs seafood heavy, thanks to its close access to the Pacific and the Columbia, but there are plenty of other options as well, including a surprisingly robust sandwich scene.

Just about every bar and restaurant in town is downtown along one strip; many are in reclaimed canneries or other industrial buildings with exposed bricks and stone floors, plus views of the Columbia. For a larger look at the Oregon Coast, one of these maps will suffice.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Knot Bar

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Every year, it seems, Astoria gets a little bigger. The Bowline Hotel is the town’s newest boutique hotel, and the Knot is its bar. Directly overlooking the Columbia with an incredible view of the ships, it’s a destination for both hotel guests and others in town. The Knot features a cocktail list of inventive drinks, like the slightly smoky agave cocktail Smoking Gun, or the olive oil-washed martini that uses Oregon vodka and vermouth. The pro move is to grab some snacks like the pickled carrots and warm bread, order a few drinks, and watch the ships go by.

Astoria Food Hub

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As Astoria’s food scene continues to grow, the port town has added its own communal food hall. At the moment, Astoria Food Hub is home only to Buoy Beer, which moved its hospitality operations to the spacious warehouse after its own facilities collapsed. For now, visitors can snag a hearty sandwich, fish and chips, or beer-simmered bratwurst to go with the many ales and lagers on draught and by the bottle. Expect farmers’ market goods, a cafe, and a flower shop down the line.

Astoria Coffee House & Bistro

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While Astoria has a fair amount of cafes, including the excellent bakery Blue Scorcher, the Astoria Coffee House fills that small town niche of the eclectically decorated cafe with all-day menus. Tourists and residents visit this open-walled bistro for its morning pastries and coffee, casual lunch menu of sandwiches and other fare, and expansive dinner menu that features a varied selection of dishes. There’s always burgers, salads, and pasta, but night-to-night diners can find stir fries, curries, tacos, poke bowls, shrimp and grits, and pork chops. It’s all a bit chaotic, but it means there’s something there for everyone.

Brut Wine Bar and Retail Shop

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Astoria, with its two colossal breweries, is generally known as a beer town, but wine fans have a haven at Brut Wine Bar. This quiet and cozy shop is nestled downtown — like many wine bars, it spent most of 2020 as retail only, but today is open indoors, as well as out on its new patio seating area. There, visitors can sip on the thoughtfully curated list of wines by the glass and bottle that emphasizes fun, affordable wines — think: European rosés and Oregon pinot. Diners can find cheese boards, Olympia Provisions charcuterie platters, and other wine-friendly snacks, and those who are hungrier can find burgers and other pub food across the street at the Merry Time Bar and Grill.

South Bay Wild Fish House

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A fishing company, seafood market, and restaurant, South Bay Wild offers one of the most direct sea-and-river-to-plate experiences in town. The menu is, predictably, all about the seafood, but with its own spin on it. Rather than large filets of salmon or cod, it offers snackier items like crab cakes, ceviche, poke, and calamari. There’s a wide selection of seafood and chips, including scallops, prawns, and rockfish; seafood banh mi; and fry breads topped with goat cheese and red pepper tapenade or parsley chimichurri, with add-ons like crab, pink shrimp, or black cod. The casual restaurant features a fish counter in the back, a balcony bar, and a homey dining room with vintage aesthetics — there’s also a small amount of outdoor seating for sunny days.

Busu Astoria

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A literal hole-in-the-wall, Busu operates out of a single window with a few stools outside, mainly for takeout. The menu features a small selection of Japanese comfort dishes that change regularly, with the owner posting updates on Instagram. Generally, visitors can find a soup or two, okonomiyaki, and yakisoba, but specials like curry, chicken karaage, and udon have made appearances. Whatever the case, it’s always rich, flavorful, and filling.

Gaetano’s Market & Deli

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Astoria’s first Italian market, Gaetano’s operates primarily as a deli with grab-and-go options. In the inviting, window-lined shop, visitors can find Italian sundries and pantry items, cured meats, cheeses, and olive oils, as well as excellent bake-at-home lasagnas and ziti dishes. Those looking for something fast and filling should head to the deli counter for a sandwich: Cold sandwiches include an Italian grinder with salty, rich cured meats balanced by creamy mozzarella and arugula; a lighter turkey sandwich with provolone and sun-dried tomatoes on crispy ciabatta; and a lovely caprese sandwich as a vegetarian option. Hot sandwiches include meatball subs, pastrami and havarti, and various panini.

Custard King

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A tiny drive-in burger shop, Custard King channels vintage charm and serves a variety of straightforward burgers — including a pretty immaculate bacon cheeseburger — plus fries, fish and chips, tacos, chicken strips, and chowder. Those with a sweet tooth can find the iconic frozen custard that gives the venerable drive-in its name, along with a selection of shakes and malts. Summertime offers some outdoor seating for the baskets of thick burgers and crispy, golden fries, but when skies are gray it’s best to take it to go.

Drina Daisy Bosnian Restaurant

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While Astoria is well-known for its breweries and Northwestern seafood, it’s also home to Drina Daisy, which serves cuisine from the Bosnian heartland in a homey and elegant space filled with white tablecloths and tchotkes. Alongside Turkish coffee served in elaborately carved cezveler, diners can find platters of cold-smoked beef sausage, red pepper spreads with crusty bread, stuffed cabbage, and a selection of pitas. Unlike the fluffy flatbread or pockets commonly associated with pitas, Bosnian pita are pies made with golden, flaky phyllo, baked to order with stuffed ingredients like beef, spinach, or cheese.

View this post on Instagram

Delicious Bosnian stew

A post shared by Yasmin Nguyen (@yazpics) on

The Naked Lemon

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A cute and charming tiny shop at the edge of the main strip, the Naked Lemon is one of the city’s only dedicated patisseries. Its specialities are mainly fluffy and crispy array of macarons with flavors like birthday cake and passionfruit, massive chocolate chip cookies, and decadent “celebration” cakes that come in classic chocolate and vanilla flavors. It’s all made by the baker and owner Aleesha Serrita Nedd. The small space isn’t conducive for on-premise dining, but those dropping in can grab a cup of hot tea with their confections.

Pelayo's Taqueria

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Sitting in a nearly empty lot across the street from the famed Bowpicker, the Pelayo’s Taqueria truck is unmistakable thanks to its vivid red-and-orange paint job. The food truck serves a large menu of Mexican staples from its small window, but the main draw are the birria tacos. Cheesy, rich, and bold, they’re served with a bowl of meaty broth, optionally with ramen noodles. Other offerings include a variety of taco fillings — including pescado, lengua, and chorizo — as well as hearty burritos, tortas, and even breakfast plates.

Bowpicker Fish and Chips

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A popular spot for both tourists and locals, Bowpicker, a walk-up window housed in a stationary ship, offers only two things: beer-battered fried fish and golden steak fries. Rather than the more familiar fish species like cod or rockfish, Bowpicker exclusively serves fried tuna, which makes for a meatier, heartier fried fish, with only a light breading. On warm, sunny days, diners can expect a line, though it moves quickly; on inclement weather days, it’s wise to check Bowpicker’s social media, as the store sometimes avoids opening.

Sasquatch Sandwich Shop

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One of a number of food carts in the evolving Astoria food cart scene, Sasquatch Sandwich serves sandwiches that can easily compete with those coming from larger cities. They tend toward the meatier side, with staples like a Korean pork belly sandwich, a knockout Reuben, and an even more knockout Reuben with the addition of pepper jack, kimchi slaw, and spicy mayo — a third reuben is a veggie option, with thick mushrooms instead of beef. There’s not a lot of dining space in the food cart lot, but visitors can bring it a few blocks over to the lot outside of Reach Break Brewing and Reveille Cider

Surf 2 Soul

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Soul food is hard to come by in Astoria, but luckily, Surf 2 Soul delivers. The food cart has a limited menu that regularly changes up and adds daily specials, but the menu often includes its most popular dish, “chicken n the biscuit” — a Tillamook cheddar biscuit with fried chicken and gravy, all made in house. Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and po’ boys often grace the menu, as well.

Fort George Brewery

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Fort George, one of Astoria’s two biggest breweries, offers numerous dining rooms in a vaulted, industrial space. The main floor sports the brewpub, with a menu of staples like burgers and seafood, while a spiral iron staircase leads to an upper floor with more casual seating and Astoria’s best pizza. The brewpub offered its food exclusively to-go during the winter of the pandemic, and expanded its outdoor seating area for dining in the warmer months. It’s currently open for full service.

Blue Scorcher Bakery & Cafe

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A coffee shop, bakery, and cafe with hippie vibes, Blue Scorcher provides some of the city’s top baked goods, including rustic breads, pies, and occasionally pizzas. While there is a full breakfast and lunch menu, including sandwiches served on bread baked in house, the bakery’s claim to fame is its pastries — lines form at the door early for Danishes, fruit scones, muffins, cinnamon rolls and, especially, the sticky-sweet cardamom-almond rolls, which generally come in large and small sizes. Its dining room is now back open, with a more limited food menu and a smaller seating area, but most customers are still grabbing a coffee and pastry to go these days.

Blaylock’s Whiskey Bar

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One could be forgiven for wandering into Blaylock’s and thinking they just entered a smaller version of the Multnomah Whiskey Library — with tufted leather chairs and an emerald green tiled back bar, the Astoria lounge was clearly inspired by the Portland mainstay. But as the town’s first dedicated whiskey bar, Blaylock’s stands on its own, with a list of well-executed cocktails and a robust menu of almost 200 whiskeys from around the world. And, like Portland bars, there’s now outdoor dining options, as well as indoor dining.

Portway

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Offering zero pretense, affordable drinks, and solid bar food, the Portway is the resident not-quite-a-dive bar. There’s the requisite video poker machines, friendly service, cheap wells, and mix of local and domestic beers, but this local local haunt improves on the standard dive bar food, including some golden-fried fish and chips served with waffle fries, and a stand-out patty melt with high-quality beef and caramelized onions. Dining is available indoors and out on the patio deck under umbrellas.

Ship Out Fish & Chips

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Just over the Old Youngs Bay Bridge and down the road a bit is Ship Out Fish & Chips, a food cart and successor the Ship Inn, which served Astoria’s waterfront for more than 40 years. The Ship Out serves flaky halibut, plump shrimp, and crispy calamari all fried to a beautiful golden hue alongside fries and slaw. After ordering from the cart, diners should head inside to the dining room, housed in a gravel-lined warehouse space chock full of garden ornaments like ponds, statues, and even metallic dragons.

The Knot Bar

Every year, it seems, Astoria gets a little bigger. The Bowline Hotel is the town’s newest boutique hotel, and the Knot is its bar. Directly overlooking the Columbia with an incredible view of the ships, it’s a destination for both hotel guests and others in town. The Knot features a cocktail list of inventive drinks, like the slightly smoky agave cocktail Smoking Gun, or the olive oil-washed martini that uses Oregon vodka and vermouth. The pro move is to grab some snacks like the pickled carrots and warm bread, order a few drinks, and watch the ships go by.

Astoria Food Hub

As Astoria’s food scene continues to grow, the port town has added its own communal food hall. At the moment, Astoria Food Hub is home only to Buoy Beer, which moved its hospitality operations to the spacious warehouse after its own facilities collapsed. For now, visitors can snag a hearty sandwich, fish and chips, or beer-simmered bratwurst to go with the many ales and lagers on draught and by the bottle. Expect farmers’ market goods, a cafe, and a flower shop down the line.

Astoria Coffee House & Bistro

While Astoria has a fair amount of cafes, including the excellent bakery Blue Scorcher, the Astoria Coffee House fills that small town niche of the eclectically decorated cafe with all-day menus. Tourists and residents visit this open-walled bistro for its morning pastries and coffee, casual lunch menu of sandwiches and other fare, and expansive dinner menu that features a varied selection of dishes. There’s always burgers, salads, and pasta, but night-to-night diners can find stir fries, curries, tacos, poke bowls, shrimp and grits, and pork chops. It’s all a bit chaotic, but it means there’s something there for everyone.

Brut Wine Bar and Retail Shop

Astoria, with its two colossal breweries, is generally known as a beer town, but wine fans have a haven at Brut Wine Bar. This quiet and cozy shop is nestled downtown — like many wine bars, it spent most of 2020 as retail only, but today is open indoors, as well as out on its new patio seating area. There, visitors can sip on the thoughtfully curated list of wines by the glass and bottle that emphasizes fun, affordable wines — think: European rosés and Oregon pinot. Diners can find cheese boards, Olympia Provisions charcuterie platters, and other wine-friendly snacks, and those who are hungrier can find burgers and other pub food across the street at the Merry Time Bar and Grill.

South Bay Wild Fish House

A fishing company, seafood market, and restaurant, South Bay Wild offers one of the most direct sea-and-river-to-plate experiences in town. The menu is, predictably, all about the seafood, but with its own spin on it. Rather than large filets of salmon or cod, it offers snackier items like crab cakes, ceviche, poke, and calamari. There’s a wide selection of seafood and chips, including scallops, prawns, and rockfish; seafood banh mi; and fry breads topped with goat cheese and red pepper tapenade or parsley chimichurri, with add-ons like crab, pink shrimp, or black cod. The casual restaurant features a fish counter in the back, a balcony bar, and a homey dining room with vintage aesthetics — there’s also a small amount of outdoor seating for sunny days.

Busu Astoria

A literal hole-in-the-wall, Busu operates out of a single window with a few stools outside, mainly for takeout. The menu features a small selection of Japanese comfort dishes that change regularly, with the owner posting updates on Instagram. Generally, visitors can find a soup or two, okonomiyaki, and yakisoba, but specials like curry, chicken karaage, and udon have made appearances. Whatever the case, it’s always rich, flavorful, and filling.

Gaetano’s Market & Deli

Astoria’s first Italian market, Gaetano’s operates primarily as a deli with grab-and-go options. In the inviting, window-lined shop, visitors can find Italian sundries and pantry items, cured meats, cheeses, and olive oils, as well as excellent bake-at-home lasagnas and ziti dishes. Those looking for something fast and filling should head to the deli counter for a sandwich: Cold sandwiches include an Italian grinder with salty, rich cured meats balanced by creamy mozzarella and arugula; a lighter turkey sandwich with provolone and sun-dried tomatoes on crispy ciabatta; and a lovely caprese sandwich as a vegetarian option. Hot sandwiches include meatball subs, pastrami and havarti, and various panini.

Custard King

A tiny drive-in burger shop, Custard King channels vintage charm and serves a variety of straightforward burgers — including a pretty immaculate bacon cheeseburger — plus fries, fish and chips, tacos, chicken strips, and chowder. Those with a sweet tooth can find the iconic frozen custard that gives the venerable drive-in its name, along with a selection of shakes and malts. Summertime offers some outdoor seating for the baskets of thick burgers and crispy, golden fries, but when skies are gray it’s best to take it to go.

Drina Daisy Bosnian Restaurant

While Astoria is well-known for its breweries and Northwestern seafood, it’s also home to Drina Daisy, which serves cuisine from the Bosnian heartland in a homey and elegant space filled with white tablecloths and tchotkes. Alongside Turkish coffee served in elaborately carved cezveler, diners can find platters of cold-smoked beef sausage, red pepper spreads with crusty bread, stuffed cabbage, and a selection of pitas. Unlike the fluffy flatbread or pockets commonly associated with pitas, Bosnian pita are pies made with golden, flaky phyllo, baked to order with stuffed ingredients like beef, spinach, or cheese.

View this post on Instagram

Delicious Bosnian stew

A post shared by Yasmin Nguyen (@yazpics) on

The Naked Lemon

A cute and charming tiny shop at the edge of the main strip, the Naked Lemon is one of the city’s only dedicated patisseries. Its specialities are mainly fluffy and crispy array of macarons with flavors like birthday cake and passionfruit, massive chocolate chip cookies, and decadent “celebration” cakes that come in classic chocolate and vanilla flavors. It’s all made by the baker and owner Aleesha Serrita Nedd. The small space isn’t conducive for on-premise dining, but those dropping in can grab a cup of hot tea with their confections.

Pelayo's Taqueria

Sitting in a nearly empty lot across the street from the famed Bowpicker, the Pelayo’s Taqueria truck is unmistakable thanks to its vivid red-and-orange paint job. The food truck serves a large menu of Mexican staples from its small window, but the main draw are the birria tacos. Cheesy, rich, and bold, they’re served with a bowl of meaty broth, optionally with ramen noodles. Other offerings include a variety of taco fillings — including pescado, lengua, and chorizo — as well as hearty burritos, tortas, and even breakfast plates.

Bowpicker Fish and Chips

A popular spot for both tourists and locals, Bowpicker, a walk-up window housed in a stationary ship, offers only two things: beer-battered fried fish and golden steak fries. Rather than the more familiar fish species like cod or rockfish, Bowpicker exclusively serves fried tuna, which makes for a meatier, heartier fried fish, with only a light breading. On warm, sunny days, diners can expect a line, though it moves quickly; on inclement weather days, it’s wise to check Bowpicker’s social media, as the store sometimes avoids opening.

Sasquatch Sandwich Shop

One of a number of food carts in the evolving Astoria food cart scene, Sasquatch Sandwich serves sandwiches that can easily compete with those coming from larger cities. They tend toward the meatier side, with staples like a Korean pork belly sandwich, a knockout Reuben, and an even more knockout Reuben with the addition of pepper jack, kimchi slaw, and spicy mayo — a third reuben is a veggie option, with thick mushrooms instead of beef. There’s not a lot of dining space in the food cart lot, but visitors can bring it a few blocks over to the lot outside of Reach Break Brewing and Reveille Cider

Surf 2 Soul

Soul food is hard to come by in Astoria, but luckily, Surf 2 Soul delivers. The food cart has a limited menu that regularly changes up and adds daily specials, but the menu often includes its most popular dish, “chicken n the biscuit” — a Tillamook cheddar biscuit with fried chicken and gravy, all made in house. Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and po’ boys often grace the menu, as well.

Fort George Brewery

Fort George, one of Astoria’s two biggest breweries, offers numerous dining rooms in a vaulted, industrial space. The main floor sports the brewpub, with a menu of staples like burgers and seafood, while a spiral iron staircase leads to an upper floor with more casual seating and Astoria’s best pizza. The brewpub offered its food exclusively to-go during the winter of the pandemic, and expanded its outdoor seating area for dining in the warmer months. It’s currently open for full service.

Related Maps

Blue Scorcher Bakery & Cafe

A coffee shop, bakery, and cafe with hippie vibes, Blue Scorcher provides some of the city’s top baked goods, including rustic breads, pies, and occasionally pizzas. While there is a full breakfast and lunch menu, including sandwiches served on bread baked in house, the bakery’s claim to fame is its pastries — lines form at the door early for Danishes, fruit scones, muffins, cinnamon rolls and, especially, the sticky-sweet cardamom-almond rolls, which generally come in large and small sizes. Its dining room is now back open, with a more limited food menu and a smaller seating area, but most customers are still grabbing a coffee and pastry to go these days.

Blaylock’s Whiskey Bar

One could be forgiven for wandering into Blaylock’s and thinking they just entered a smaller version of the Multnomah Whiskey Library — with tufted leather chairs and an emerald green tiled back bar, the Astoria lounge was clearly inspired by the Portland mainstay. But as the town’s first dedicated whiskey bar, Blaylock’s stands on its own, with a list of well-executed cocktails and a robust menu of almost 200 whiskeys from around the world. And, like Portland bars, there’s now outdoor dining options, as well as indoor dining.

Portway

Offering zero pretense, affordable drinks, and solid bar food, the Portway is the resident not-quite-a-dive bar. There’s the requisite video poker machines, friendly service, cheap wells, and mix of local and domestic beers, but this local local haunt improves on the standard dive bar food, including some golden-fried fish and chips served with waffle fries, and a stand-out patty melt with high-quality beef and caramelized onions. Dining is available indoors and out on the patio deck under umbrellas.

Ship Out Fish & Chips

Just over the Old Youngs Bay Bridge and down the road a bit is Ship Out Fish & Chips, a food cart and successor the Ship Inn, which served Astoria’s waterfront for more than 40 years. The Ship Out serves flaky halibut, plump shrimp, and crispy calamari all fried to a beautiful golden hue alongside fries and slaw. After ordering from the cart, diners should head inside to the dining room, housed in a gravel-lined warehouse space chock full of garden ornaments like ponds, statues, and even metallic dragons.

Related Maps