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A panoramic view of Commercial fishing boats at a moorage in Astoria, Oregon.
Astoria, Oregon.
Bob Pool/Shutterstock

Where to Eat and Drink When Visiting Gorgeous Astoria, Oregon

Seafood restaurants, breweries, and food carts are the can’t-miss spots when visiting this Oregon port town

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Astoria, Oregon.
| Bob Pool/Shutterstock

Located at the Northwestern tip of Oregon where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean, Astoria is a food-lover’s favorite for its breweries, seafood, and growing food cart scene. Its storied history includes the indigenous people of the Clatsop and Chinook tribes, Lewis and Clark, John Jacob Astor, and Finnish socialists that revolutionized the fish processing industry in its heyday. Today the canneries are more about beer, especially with Astoria’s ever-expanding (though occasionally collapsing) breweries Buoy and Fort George.

Many bars and restaurants are downtown in reclaimed industrial buildings with details like exposed bricks and stone floors, but it’s worth seeking out places on the edges of town, as well. For more dining options on the Oregon Coast, one of these maps should suffice.

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Coffee Girl

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Charming to visitors and residents alike, Coffee Girl has one of the most scenic river views in town — perched out on Pier 39 in Astoria’s Uppertown district on the east side. Occupying a building that formerly housed the historic Bumble Bee cannery on the Columbia River, it’s open seven days a week with a menu of coffee specialties, pastries, and savories like quiche and soups. It’s a great place to wow family in town for a weekend (the complex has not only views of ships but also a cannery museum and fish market) or just to compose one’s thoughts over email in a quiet corner. The long deck overlooking the river still functions as a dock, so occasionally you’ll see a boat pulling up to say hello.

A food-lover trip to the North Coast isn’t complete without a stop at Astoria’s new traditional Italian trattoria, Fedé. Sitting pretty on the Columbia River waterfront, the intimate dining room has become a hangout for residents jonesing for house-made pastas and craft cocktails with ingredients like the restaurant’s own limoncello. Husband and wife team Faith Davenport and Sean Hammond boldly eschew Oregon Coast expectations about what an Italian restaurant should serve, instead offering dishes like octopus and potatoes or Calabrian pasta with ‘nudja sausage paste. And those who would prefer an excellent lasagna or giant meatballs will find them here as well. No reservations, so prepare to watch ships pass by from the restaurant’s patio as you wait.

Buoy Beer Company

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Buoy Beer, which moved its taproom to the spacious Astoria Food Hub warehouse after its own facilities collapsed, is one of Astoria’s iconic breweries and a point of pride for the town’s beer lovers. In its new family-friendly digs, visitors can knock back a pint or two in a bright, modern space with counter service. Thoughtfully sourced menu items include rockfish and chips, an albacore tuna salad sandwich, or oysters from nearby waters, plus burgers, soft pretzels and salads. An array of rotating ales and lagers on draft and by the bottle will please all palates, and the kids’ menu will please small ones.

Astoria Coffee House & Bistro

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While Astoria has a fair number of bakeries, including the stately hangout spot Blue Scorcher and little takeaway Naked Lemon, the Astoria Coffee House fills the small-town niche of the eclectic cafe with all-day menus. Visit this charming bistro for morning pastries and coffee concoctions on one side of the cavernous building, or grab a bar seat or booth for a casual lunch of sandwiches or dinner from a menu that features globally inspired dishes. There’s always burgers, salads, and pasta, but you’ll also find specials like sushi and martini Mondays in summer or prime rib Fridays in fall.

Brut Wine Bar and Retail Shop

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Astoria is generally known as a beer town, but wine fans have a haven at Brut Wine Bar. This quiet and cozy shop is nestled downtown and has limited patio seating area on the sidewalk in front of the store. It’s easy to drop in and select from the curated list of wines by the glass and bottle. This is no stuffy affair: Brut emphasizes fun, affordable wines from around the world, like European rosé and bubbly inspired by owner Lisa Park’s travels, as well as standards like Oregon-produced pinots from independent wineries. Diners can find cheese and charcuterie boards and other wine-friendly snacks, plus a lot of friendly conversation.

Owner Lisa Park pours a Spanish rosé.
Owner Lisa Park pours a Spanish rosé at Brut Wine Bar.
Jennifer Burns Bright/Eater Portland

South Bay Wild Fish House

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The fishing family who owns South Bay Wild supplies the restaurant with seafood from their own boat and those of friends, offering one of the most direct sea-and-river-to-plate experiences in town. The menu is, predictably, all about the seafood: Snackier items like crab cakes, ceviche, and poke are great, but there’s also a remarkably crispy version of seafood and chips, including scallops, prawns, and rockfish. Dover sole banh mi sandwiches and fry bread — try it topped with Dungeness crab, goat cheese, and red pepper tapenade — are welcome twists on the usual coastal restaurant menu. Sit at the massive communal table repurposed from a marine shop in the homey nautical-themed dining room or at the balcony bar. There’s also some outdoor seating for sunny days.

Busu Astoria

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A literal hole-in-the-wall, Busu operates out of a single window with a few stools outside, mainly for takeout, a few times a week. The menu features a small selection of comfort dishes that change regularly, with chef and owner Kenneth Booth posting updates on Instagram. Generally, visitors can find a hearty soup, rice bowl topped with seasonal goodies, and Japanese-inspired specialties like yakisoba, chicken karaage, and udon. Keep an eye out for mushrooms foraged by Booth himself or other local foragers, and a range of fermented and pickled goods.

Owner Kenneth Booth holding a basket of chanterelles.
Busu owner Kenneth Booth.
Jennifer Burns Bright

Gaetano’s Market & Deli

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Astoria’s first Italian market, Gaetano’s operates primarily as a deli with grab-and-go options. In the inviting, window-lined shop, visitors can find Italian sundries and pantry items, cured meats, cheeses, and olive oils, as well as excellent bake-at-home lasagnas and housemade pasta. Those looking for something fast and filling should head to the deli counter for a sandwich: Cold sandwiches include classic Italian American-style grinders stuffed with salty, rich cured meats and layered with cheeses like creamy mozzarella or provolone. Try the Astorialetta, its interpretation of a classic muffuletta; the turkey sandwich with provolone and sun-dried tomatoes on crispy ciabatta; or The Goat, a vegetarian option with goat cheese, roasted peppers, and other vegetables. Hot sandwiches include saucy meatball subs and various panini.

Drina Daisy Bosnian Restaurant

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For a downtown spot offering something other than seafood, try Drina Daisy, which serves cuisine from the Bosnian heartland in a homey space filled with white tablecloths and tchotkes. Alongside Turkish coffee served in elaborately carved cezveler, diners can find platters of cold-smoked beef sausage, red pepper spreads with crusty bread, stuffed cabbage, and a selection of pitas. Unlike the fluffy flatbread or pockets commonly associated with pitas, Bosnian pita are pies made with golden, flaky phyllo, baked to order with stuffed ingredients like beef, spinach, or cheese.

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Delicious Bosnian stew

A post shared by Yasmin Nguyen (@yazpics) on

Surf 2 Soul

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Soul food is hard to come by in Astoria, but luckily, Surf 2 Soul delivers. The award-winning food cart, which took home best food cart in the People’s Choice Awards for Coast Weekend in 2022, has a limited menu that regularly changes up and adds daily specials. Look for its most popular dish, “chicken ‘n the biscuit” — a soft and crispy Tillamook cheddar biscuit with fried chicken and gravy, all made in house. Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and po’ boys often grace the menu, as well.

Fort George Brewery

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Fort George, one of Astoria’s two biggest breweries, offers numerous dining rooms in a vaulted, industrial space that’s always filled with fans and conviviality. The main floor sports the brewpub, with a menu of staples like burgers and seafood to pair with the brewery’s famous stouts, porters, and lighter options. A spiral iron staircase leads to an upper floor with more casual seating and pizza. You can also sit in the intimate taphouse in a historic renovated garage next door that still hosts some of the more select brewing operations, or outdoor on a breezy patio with a fire pit.

Coastal Smash

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Coastal Smash, one of the excellent choices in the food cart pod outside Reach Break Brewing, does one thing, and it does it right: burgers with thin, ultra crispy patties, served with a mound of thin-cut fries flecked with parsley and salt. The team here is fast and efficient, but you’ll want to arrive early since the cart tends to sell out on busy evenings. Check out the specials board for creative alternatives like the kimchi smash, and grab a drink from the cooler or a frosty pint at the brewery. Meat lovers and decadents will want to order something with two or three patties stacked high.

Portway Tavern

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Offering zero pretense, affordable drinks, and solid bar food, the Portway is the resident not-quite-a-dive bar. There’s the requisite nautical decor, video poker machines, friendly service, cheap wells, and mix of local and domestic beers, but this local local haunt improves on the standard dive bar food, including a stand-out patty melt with high-quality beef and caramelized onions, and some of the best burgers in town. Dining is available indoors and out on the patio deck under umbrellas.

La Cabaña de Raya

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Just over Old Youngs Bay Bridge and set right on the bay in a weathered shack, this family-run Mexican restaurant is off the beaten path for most tourists, but well worth the detour. Guisada (meat sautéed with saucy peppers and onions) and carnitas plates are the stars here, as are the quesabirria tacos that are also served at the family’s cherry-red food cart, Taqueria Los Compas, near the Astoria-Megler bridge. Sit on the patio for a pleasant waterside view.

Arnie's Cafe

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Sometimes you just need a giant cinnamon roll; Arnie’s has it covered. For hearty, down-home breakfasts of eggs Benedict, pancakes, chicken-fried steak — basically all of the carbs you’d ever want and need — head just west of Astoria to Warrenton’s downtown. You may be seated next to campers at nearby Fort Stevens State Park or cyclists making their way up the coast, so it’s great people-watching in the large but busy family-friendly dining room. No reservations, so plan to wait a bit on weekends.

Ship Out Fish & Chips

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Located south of downtown in the Jeffers Garden district over Old Youngs Bay Bridge, Ship Out Fish & Chips is a successor of the Ship Inn, which served Astoria’s waterfront for more than 40 years. Like Bowpicker Fish & Chips on the other side of town, it’s an Astoria classic. Where Bowpicker exclusively fries up albacore tuna for its baskets, Ship Out serves golden-hued battered halibut, plump shrimp, and crispy calamari alongside fries and slaw. After ordering from the cart, diners should head inside to the dining room, housed in a gravel-lined warehouse space chock full of garden ornaments like ponds, statues, and even metallic creatures.

Coffee Girl

Charming to visitors and residents alike, Coffee Girl has one of the most scenic river views in town — perched out on Pier 39 in Astoria’s Uppertown district on the east side. Occupying a building that formerly housed the historic Bumble Bee cannery on the Columbia River, it’s open seven days a week with a menu of coffee specialties, pastries, and savories like quiche and soups. It’s a great place to wow family in town for a weekend (the complex has not only views of ships but also a cannery museum and fish market) or just to compose one’s thoughts over email in a quiet corner. The long deck overlooking the river still functions as a dock, so occasionally you’ll see a boat pulling up to say hello.

Fedé

A food-lover trip to the North Coast isn’t complete without a stop at Astoria’s new traditional Italian trattoria, Fedé. Sitting pretty on the Columbia River waterfront, the intimate dining room has become a hangout for residents jonesing for house-made pastas and craft cocktails with ingredients like the restaurant’s own limoncello. Husband and wife team Faith Davenport and Sean Hammond boldly eschew Oregon Coast expectations about what an Italian restaurant should serve, instead offering dishes like octopus and potatoes or Calabrian pasta with ‘nudja sausage paste. And those who would prefer an excellent lasagna or giant meatballs will find them here as well. No reservations, so prepare to watch ships pass by from the restaurant’s patio as you wait.

Buoy Beer Company

Buoy Beer, which moved its taproom to the spacious Astoria Food Hub warehouse after its own facilities collapsed, is one of Astoria’s iconic breweries and a point of pride for the town’s beer lovers. In its new family-friendly digs, visitors can knock back a pint or two in a bright, modern space with counter service. Thoughtfully sourced menu items include rockfish and chips, an albacore tuna salad sandwich, or oysters from nearby waters, plus burgers, soft pretzels and salads. An array of rotating ales and lagers on draft and by the bottle will please all palates, and the kids’ menu will please small ones.

Astoria Coffee House & Bistro

While Astoria has a fair number of bakeries, including the stately hangout spot Blue Scorcher and little takeaway Naked Lemon, the Astoria Coffee House fills the small-town niche of the eclectic cafe with all-day menus. Visit this charming bistro for morning pastries and coffee concoctions on one side of the cavernous building, or grab a bar seat or booth for a casual lunch of sandwiches or dinner from a menu that features globally inspired dishes. There’s always burgers, salads, and pasta, but you’ll also find specials like sushi and martini Mondays in summer or prime rib Fridays in fall.

Brut Wine Bar and Retail Shop

Astoria is generally known as a beer town, but wine fans have a haven at Brut Wine Bar. This quiet and cozy shop is nestled downtown and has limited patio seating area on the sidewalk in front of the store. It’s easy to drop in and select from the curated list of wines by the glass and bottle. This is no stuffy affair: Brut emphasizes fun, affordable wines from around the world, like European rosé and bubbly inspired by owner Lisa Park’s travels, as well as standards like Oregon-produced pinots from independent wineries. Diners can find cheese and charcuterie boards and other wine-friendly snacks, plus a lot of friendly conversation.

Owner Lisa Park pours a Spanish rosé.
Owner Lisa Park pours a Spanish rosé at Brut Wine Bar.
Jennifer Burns Bright/Eater Portland

South Bay Wild Fish House

The fishing family who owns South Bay Wild supplies the restaurant with seafood from their own boat and those of friends, offering one of the most direct sea-and-river-to-plate experiences in town. The menu is, predictably, all about the seafood: Snackier items like crab cakes, ceviche, and poke are great, but there’s also a remarkably crispy version of seafood and chips, including scallops, prawns, and rockfish. Dover sole banh mi sandwiches and fry bread — try it topped with Dungeness crab, goat cheese, and red pepper tapenade — are welcome twists on the usual coastal restaurant menu. Sit at the massive communal table repurposed from a marine shop in the homey nautical-themed dining room or at the balcony bar. There’s also some outdoor seating for sunny days.

Busu Astoria

A literal hole-in-the-wall, Busu operates out of a single window with a few stools outside, mainly for takeout, a few times a week. The menu features a small selection of comfort dishes that change regularly, with chef and owner Kenneth Booth posting updates on Instagram. Generally, visitors can find a hearty soup, rice bowl topped with seasonal goodies, and Japanese-inspired specialties like yakisoba, chicken karaage, and udon. Keep an eye out for mushrooms foraged by Booth himself or other local foragers, and a range of fermented and pickled goods.

Owner Kenneth Booth holding a basket of chanterelles.
Busu owner Kenneth Booth.
Jennifer Burns Bright

Gaetano’s Market & Deli

Astoria’s first Italian market, Gaetano’s operates primarily as a deli with grab-and-go options. In the inviting, window-lined shop, visitors can find Italian sundries and pantry items, cured meats, cheeses, and olive oils, as well as excellent bake-at-home lasagnas and housemade pasta. Those looking for something fast and filling should head to the deli counter for a sandwich: Cold sandwiches include classic Italian American-style grinders stuffed with salty, rich cured meats and layered with cheeses like creamy mozzarella or provolone. Try the Astorialetta, its interpretation of a classic muffuletta; the turkey sandwich with provolone and sun-dried tomatoes on crispy ciabatta; or The Goat, a vegetarian option with goat cheese, roasted peppers, and other vegetables. Hot sandwiches include saucy meatball subs and various panini.

Drina Daisy Bosnian Restaurant

For a downtown spot offering something other than seafood, try Drina Daisy, which serves cuisine from the Bosnian heartland in a homey space filled with white tablecloths and tchotkes. Alongside Turkish coffee served in elaborately carved cezveler, diners can find platters of cold-smoked beef sausage, red pepper spreads with crusty bread, stuffed cabbage, and a selection of pitas. Unlike the fluffy flatbread or pockets commonly associated with pitas, Bosnian pita are pies made with golden, flaky phyllo, baked to order with stuffed ingredients like beef, spinach, or cheese.

View this post on Instagram

Delicious Bosnian stew

A post shared by Yasmin Nguyen (@yazpics) on

Surf 2 Soul

Soul food is hard to come by in Astoria, but luckily, Surf 2 Soul delivers. The award-winning food cart, which took home best food cart in the People’s Choice Awards for Coast Weekend in 2022, has a limited menu that regularly changes up and adds daily specials. Look for its most popular dish, “chicken ‘n the biscuit” — a soft and crispy Tillamook cheddar biscuit with fried chicken and gravy, all made in house. Chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, and po’ boys often grace the menu, as well.

Fort George Brewery

Fort George, one of Astoria’s two biggest breweries, offers numerous dining rooms in a vaulted, industrial space that’s always filled with fans and conviviality. The main floor sports the brewpub, with a menu of staples like burgers and seafood to pair with the brewery’s famous stouts, porters, and lighter options. A spiral iron staircase leads to an upper floor with more casual seating and pizza. You can also sit in the intimate taphouse in a historic renovated garage next door that still hosts some of the more select brewing operations, or outdoor on a breezy patio with a fire pit.

Coastal Smash

Coastal Smash, one of the excellent choices in the food cart pod outside Reach Break Brewing, does one thing, and it does it right: burgers with thin, ultra crispy patties, served with a mound of thin-cut fries flecked with parsley and salt. The team here is fast and efficient, but you’ll want to arrive early since the cart tends to sell out on busy evenings. Check out the specials board for creative alternatives like the kimchi smash, and grab a drink from the cooler or a frosty pint at the brewery. Meat lovers and decadents will want to order something with two or three patties stacked high.

Portway Tavern

Offering zero pretense, affordable drinks, and solid bar food, the Portway is the resident not-quite-a-dive bar. There’s the requisite nautical decor, video poker machines, friendly service, cheap wells, and mix of local and domestic beers, but this local local haunt improves on the standard dive bar food, including a stand-out patty melt with high-quality beef and caramelized onions, and some of the best burgers in town. Dining is available indoors and out on the patio deck under umbrellas.

La Cabaña de Raya

Just over Old Youngs Bay Bridge and set right on the bay in a weathered shack, this family-run Mexican restaurant is off the beaten path for most tourists, but well worth the detour. Guisada (meat sautéed with saucy peppers and onions) and carnitas plates are the stars here, as are the quesabirria tacos that are also served at the family’s cherry-red food cart, Taqueria Los Compas, near the Astoria-Megler bridge. Sit on the patio for a pleasant waterside view.

Arnie's Cafe

Sometimes you just need a giant cinnamon roll; Arnie’s has it covered. For hearty, down-home breakfasts of eggs Benedict, pancakes, chicken-fried steak — basically all of the carbs you’d ever want and need — head just west of Astoria to Warrenton’s downtown. You may be seated next to campers at nearby Fort Stevens State Park or cyclists making their way up the coast, so it’s great people-watching in the large but busy family-friendly dining room. No reservations, so plan to wait a bit on weekends.

Related Maps

Ship Out Fish & Chips

Located south of downtown in the Jeffers Garden district over Old Youngs Bay Bridge, Ship Out Fish & Chips is a successor of the Ship Inn, which served Astoria’s waterfront for more than 40 years. Like Bowpicker Fish & Chips on the other side of town, it’s an Astoria classic. Where Bowpicker exclusively fries up albacore tuna for its baskets, Ship Out serves golden-hued battered halibut, plump shrimp, and crispy calamari alongside fries and slaw. After ordering from the cart, diners should head inside to the dining room, housed in a gravel-lined warehouse space chock full of garden ornaments like ponds, statues, and even metallic creatures.

Related Maps