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A woman places a pizza on a counter with a wooden paddle at Hapa Pizza in Beaverton, Oregon.
A variety of pizzas from Hapa Pizza.
Ben Lee Photography

19 Beaverton Restaurants Making the Portland Suburb a Dining Destination

Korean restaurants filling tables with banchan, a pizzeria topping pies with pho stock-braised brisket, and more

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A variety of pizzas from Hapa Pizza.
| Ben Lee Photography

Since Beaverton and Hillsboro are home to some of the largest employers in the area, it stands to reason that a wealth of dining options should be available just west of Portland. What was once home to only chains and the occasional noteworthy mom-and-pop is now a neighborhood on the rise: Established Portland names continue to set up new Beaverton branches, while other well-known chefs open new projects in the suburb. Plus, some of the area’s most interesting restaurants continue to call Beaverton home, including the state’s most expansive Indian and Korean food scene and one of its only Puerto Rican restaurants. It comes, then, as no surprise that former cider tycoon Nat West of Rev Nat’s Cider called it the “...best food city in Oregon. No joke.”

Continue on to find all the best spots for rich and spicy curries, soul-soothing bowls of ramen, and mofongo by the mouthful. For more westside dining options, check out our Hillsboro map.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Apna Chat Bhavan

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Tucked inside an Indian grocery store just a stone’s throw from U.S. Route 26 is essentially a deli counter hawking spectacular curry and rice dishes, along with broad dosas and flavorful samosas. The move here is most definitely the Gongura goat curry, which gets its tart and punchy flavor from sorrel leaves.

Taste of Sichuan Beaverton

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Taste of Sichuan, a sprawling restaurant with numerous lazy Susan-topped tables for large groups, balances Americanized and more traditional Chinese plates. The fantastic soup dumplings or chow mein with hand-shaved noodles are always reliable, but those into Sichuan classics can order from the Wild Side menu. The popcorn chicken-like Chongqing chicken offers the tongue-numbing power of Sichuan peppers, while other Wild Side staples include sour and spicy jellyfish, chile-sauce-marinated fu chi beef, and Sichuan-style crab, made with live crab.

India Sweets & Spices

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India Sweets & Spices has much in common with Apna Chat Bhavan due to its grocery store-meets-counter service hybrid model. They both serve chaats and thalis, as well as chole bhature, a fried puffy bread served with chickpea curry. The move here, however, is to order a pile of mithai, those often syrup-soaked, sometimes colorful, fudgy Indian sweets that aren’t often found in the Portland area. Treats like barfi, rasgulla, and laddoo are available by the pound, though folks can also order things like gulab jamun by the two-piece set.

Kizuki Ramen & Izakaya

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This Tokyo-founded ramen brand is one of many ramen shops in the Beaverton area, though we love Kizuki for its luscious tonkotsu base, well-complemented by the ramen shop’s black garlic oil. The stock here gets a 16-hour simmer, for maximum depth of flavor, with a pile of springy noodles and thinly sliced chashu. The restaurant’s izakaya menu includes classic dishes like takoyaki, onigiri, and agadashi tofu.

Oyatsupan Bakers

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Oyatsupan — an airy, upscale Five Oaks bakery — makes a wide array of traditional Japanese breads, pastries, and sandwiches, picked out using trays and tongs while walking through the space. Pastries are often as fun as they are delicious, like the chocolate cornet, filled with chocolate-custard cream and finished with frosting eyeballs to resemble a surprised caterpillar. Those looking for something savory can find items like a tonkatsu slider with fried pork filet or the kare doughnut, filled with beef curry.

Decarli restaurant

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Now that Decarli has moved out of the car-free dining hotbed of Old Town Beaverton and over to Hall Boulevard, folks looking for creamy risotto and crispy bruschetta might actually have a shot at getting a table there without reserving days ahead. Alongside celebratory offerings like oysters on the half shell and steak tartare, this is a premier spot for pizza and pasta. If available, the house-made squid ink chitarra is a can’t-miss dish, packed with seafood.

The Westgate Bourbon Bar & Taphouse

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Home to one of the largest whisky selections in town, The Westgate also has a massive taplist of outstanding West Coast beer and a well-crafted food menu. The chef burgers here are a standout, topped with everything from capicola to pineapple. It also features a beautiful billiard room and a good-sized bottle shop filled with beers from all over Oregon.

A hamburger and fries are shown on a white plate.
The Spicy Situation from the Westgate.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Happy Lamb Hotpot

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Sharing the same strip mall that used to house Jin Wah (RIP), Happy Lamb Hotpot is the first Oregon outpost of a Chinese hot pot chain. The restaurant is big — 210-seats big — and modern. Diners can go a la carte or all-you-can-eat, and just need to fill out a card with what they want to dip into the bubbling broth. The yin-yang soup base is exemplary, with one side chile-oil-fiery, the other mild and milky, spiked with goji berries and jujubes.

Afuri and Ramen Ryoma are worthy places to get a Japanese noodle fix in Beaverton, but Yuzu, with its counter seating and slightly hidden location, feels the most like visiting Japan. The restaurant offers a few izakaya starters, as well as multiple styles of ramen. The standout is the Kakuni ramen, with a rich tonkotsu base, bamboo shoots, pickled ginger, wakame, a slice of chasu, plus stewed chunks of pork belly for good measure. 

A bowl is ramen soup is shown in a black bowl.
Kakuni Ramen from Yuzu.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Ome Calli

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This Mexican ice cream stop stands out on Canyon Road with its brightly painted exterior and Aztec mural, serving classic flavors as well as paletas packed with Latin American fruit like guanabana, zapote, guava, and mango. Pick from the menu or just peer into the refrigerated cases at the counter and see which frozen treat appeals. Ome Calli also makes a Mexican specialty, chamoyada: A styrofoam cup, rimmed with lime juice and chile powder, filled with shaved ice, a whole paleta, and a hearty dose of chamoy, a salty, sour sauce made from pickled plums and chile powder. Pulparindo, Tama Roca, and other tamarind candies come on the side.

Coredam

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With practically no online presence of its own and zero press, this Southwest Canyon Road Korean restaurant has already attracted hour-long waits on weekdays, thanks to super generous banchan assortment, range of kalguksu (knife-cut noodle soups), and hanjeongsik, an elaborate meal consisting of several small and large dishes like bulgogi and grilled croaker. Coredam is also one of the few spots in the area serving gejang, or raw marinated crab. Several of the shop’s stews and soups — like its spicy tofu soondubu-jjigae or ox bone soup seolleongtang — are ideal for cold Oregon days.

Borikén Restaurant

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The Pacific Northwest isn’t exactly a hotbed of Caribbean restaurants — though that’s changing, albeit slowly — but if the urge for tostones or arroz con pollo hits, there’s always Borikén, a casual restaurant that transmits the tropics with its lime green and sunny orange palette. The mofongo is a standout, a dish of fried plantains mashed with chicharrones, often formed into a softball-sized orb and topped with meat or seafood. Here, it is served in a traditional pilón de madera (wooden pestle), fillings of choice piled in. It’s best with a few dashes of mojo de ajo.

Hapa Pizza

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For years, Aaron and Natalie Truong have sold their eclectic pizzas at the Beaverton Farmers Market, finally opening their own restaurant last spring. The shop’s brick oven turns out leopard-flecked Neapolitan pies with an ultra-thin crust and pillowy edges, topped with ingredients like Vietnamese barbecue pork or slow-cooked brisket to mimic the flavors of Vietnamese dishes like banh mi and pho. Those clinging to tradition can also opt for classics like margherita or pepperoni here, best accompanied by a side of yuzu ranch.

Magna Kubo

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Chef Carlo Lamagna’s west side expansion takes the form of a lechoneria, focused on the genre of Filipino rotisserie meats. At the counter service spot, diners choose from main proteins like lemongrass-marinated chicken, crispy pork belly, barbecue ribs, or a rotating deep fried fish to go along with rice, sinamak (house-made vinegar), and atchara (Filipino pickles). Save room for a sweet finish — the restaurant’s halo halo comes topped with ube ice cream and house-made leche flan.

Pip's Original Doughnuts & Chai

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At this Broadway Street mini doughnut emporium, the bite-sized treats are fried-to-order before getting dusted with sparkly cinnamon sugar, drizzled with Nutella, or dolloped with seasonal toppings like banana custard, mango ghost pepper jam, or brandied apple butter. Mix and match flavors and wash the doughnuts down with a cup of the shop’s house-made chai, made in small batches in flavors like Heart of Gold (toasted coconut, turmeric, sencha, assam) or the caffeine-free Emmylou (lavender, chamomile, chrysanthemum, fennel).

Don's Favorite Foods

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Beaverton is home to very few restaurants that offer prix fixe or tasting menus, but this new, intimate Italian American restaurant from the man behind Burger Stevens is filling the void beautifully. Meals begin with a flurry of antipasti — things like calamari salad or sesame popovers — followed by courses like sausage arancini, rigatoni alla vodka, and eggplant Parmesan. Mains are often showstoppers, whether it’s a stuffed veal breast with rapini caponata or filet mignon in cognac au poivre. Menus change monthly, generally clocking in at $95 per person. Make a reservation ahead of time.

Top Burmese Bistro Royale

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The Beaverton location of this Portland-based Burmese restaurant group may be one of its most popular: In a lush dining room filled with monsteras and pothos, visitors drink flower-topped cocktails while waiting for plates of sweet mango wings and crispy, golden-fried samosas. Regulars typically head straight for the thokes, tea leaf salads dotted with nuts and seeds, though the restaurant’s nuanced coconut noodle soup — the restaurant’s take on khow suey, a relative of Southeast Asian soups like laksa and khao soi — is a perpetually popular hit.

Nak Won Korean Restaurant

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Nak Won has been running since 2001 with an expansive variety of Korean staples, including an incredible seafood pancake. The menu is fun and quirky, with dishes named When Miss Piggy Met Hot Potato and Ice Ice Babe, and includes everything from dumplings to kimchi stew to table-top Korean barbecue. The room is a little dark (the ceiling is low and painted black), but it never feels cramped and is brightened by K-pop videos playing on wall-mounted TV screens. 

1st Street Pocha

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This charming Korean spot on — of course – 1st Street is the city’s one-stop shop for Korean street food staples, including plump, panko-fried Korean corn dogs with satisfyingly cheesy mozzarella filling, as well as steamy-spicy soups like jjamppong. However, most of 1st Street Pocha’s devotees are there for the fried chicken, crispy-crusted wings doused in sticky marinades or served dry and well-seasoned. Order them with both sauces, with a few sides of kimchi for good measure.

Apna Chat Bhavan

Tucked inside an Indian grocery store just a stone’s throw from U.S. Route 26 is essentially a deli counter hawking spectacular curry and rice dishes, along with broad dosas and flavorful samosas. The move here is most definitely the Gongura goat curry, which gets its tart and punchy flavor from sorrel leaves.

Taste of Sichuan Beaverton

Taste of Sichuan, a sprawling restaurant with numerous lazy Susan-topped tables for large groups, balances Americanized and more traditional Chinese plates. The fantastic soup dumplings or chow mein with hand-shaved noodles are always reliable, but those into Sichuan classics can order from the Wild Side menu. The popcorn chicken-like Chongqing chicken offers the tongue-numbing power of Sichuan peppers, while other Wild Side staples include sour and spicy jellyfish, chile-sauce-marinated fu chi beef, and Sichuan-style crab, made with live crab.

India Sweets & Spices

India Sweets & Spices has much in common with Apna Chat Bhavan due to its grocery store-meets-counter service hybrid model. They both serve chaats and thalis, as well as chole bhature, a fried puffy bread served with chickpea curry. The move here, however, is to order a pile of mithai, those often syrup-soaked, sometimes colorful, fudgy Indian sweets that aren’t often found in the Portland area. Treats like barfi, rasgulla, and laddoo are available by the pound, though folks can also order things like gulab jamun by the two-piece set.

Kizuki Ramen & Izakaya

This Tokyo-founded ramen brand is one of many ramen shops in the Beaverton area, though we love Kizuki for its luscious tonkotsu base, well-complemented by the ramen shop’s black garlic oil. The stock here gets a 16-hour simmer, for maximum depth of flavor, with a pile of springy noodles and thinly sliced chashu. The restaurant’s izakaya menu includes classic dishes like takoyaki, onigiri, and agadashi tofu.

Oyatsupan Bakers

Oyatsupan — an airy, upscale Five Oaks bakery — makes a wide array of traditional Japanese breads, pastries, and sandwiches, picked out using trays and tongs while walking through the space. Pastries are often as fun as they are delicious, like the chocolate cornet, filled with chocolate-custard cream and finished with frosting eyeballs to resemble a surprised caterpillar. Those looking for something savory can find items like a tonkatsu slider with fried pork filet or the kare doughnut, filled with beef curry.

Decarli restaurant

Now that Decarli has moved out of the car-free dining hotbed of Old Town Beaverton and over to Hall Boulevard, folks looking for creamy risotto and crispy bruschetta might actually have a shot at getting a table there without reserving days ahead. Alongside celebratory offerings like oysters on the half shell and steak tartare, this is a premier spot for pizza and pasta. If available, the house-made squid ink chitarra is a can’t-miss dish, packed with seafood.

The Westgate Bourbon Bar & Taphouse

Home to one of the largest whisky selections in town, The Westgate also has a massive taplist of outstanding West Coast beer and a well-crafted food menu. The chef burgers here are a standout, topped with everything from capicola to pineapple. It also features a beautiful billiard room and a good-sized bottle shop filled with beers from all over Oregon.

A hamburger and fries are shown on a white plate.
The Spicy Situation from the Westgate.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Happy Lamb Hotpot

Sharing the same strip mall that used to house Jin Wah (RIP), Happy Lamb Hotpot is the first Oregon outpost of a Chinese hot pot chain. The restaurant is big — 210-seats big — and modern. Diners can go a la carte or all-you-can-eat, and just need to fill out a card with what they want to dip into the bubbling broth. The yin-yang soup base is exemplary, with one side chile-oil-fiery, the other mild and milky, spiked with goji berries and jujubes.

Yuzu

Afuri and Ramen Ryoma are worthy places to get a Japanese noodle fix in Beaverton, but Yuzu, with its counter seating and slightly hidden location, feels the most like visiting Japan. The restaurant offers a few izakaya starters, as well as multiple styles of ramen. The standout is the Kakuni ramen, with a rich tonkotsu base, bamboo shoots, pickled ginger, wakame, a slice of chasu, plus stewed chunks of pork belly for good measure. 

A bowl is ramen soup is shown in a black bowl.
Kakuni Ramen from Yuzu.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Ome Calli

This Mexican ice cream stop stands out on Canyon Road with its brightly painted exterior and Aztec mural, serving classic flavors as well as paletas packed with Latin American fruit like guanabana, zapote, guava, and mango. Pick from the menu or just peer into the refrigerated cases at the counter and see which frozen treat appeals. Ome Calli also makes a Mexican specialty, chamoyada: A styrofoam cup, rimmed with lime juice and chile powder, filled with shaved ice, a whole paleta, and a hearty dose of chamoy, a salty, sour sauce made from pickled plums and chile powder. Pulparindo, Tama Roca, and other tamarind candies come on the side.

Coredam

With practically no online presence of its own and zero press, this Southwest Canyon Road Korean restaurant has already attracted hour-long waits on weekdays, thanks to super generous banchan assortment, range of kalguksu (knife-cut noodle soups), and hanjeongsik, an elaborate meal consisting of several small and large dishes like bulgogi and grilled croaker. Coredam is also one of the few spots in the area serving gejang, or raw marinated crab. Several of the shop’s stews and soups — like its spicy tofu soondubu-jjigae or ox bone soup seolleongtang — are ideal for cold Oregon days.

Borikén Restaurant

The Pacific Northwest isn’t exactly a hotbed of Caribbean restaurants — though that’s changing, albeit slowly — but if the urge for tostones or arroz con pollo hits, there’s always Borikén, a casual restaurant that transmits the tropics with its lime green and sunny orange palette. The mofongo is a standout, a dish of fried plantains mashed with chicharrones, often formed into a softball-sized orb and topped with meat or seafood. Here, it is served in a traditional pilón de madera (wooden pestle), fillings of choice piled in. It’s best with a few dashes of mojo de ajo.

Hapa Pizza

For years, Aaron and Natalie Truong have sold their eclectic pizzas at the Beaverton Farmers Market, finally opening their own restaurant last spring. The shop’s brick oven turns out leopard-flecked Neapolitan pies with an ultra-thin crust and pillowy edges, topped with ingredients like Vietnamese barbecue pork or slow-cooked brisket to mimic the flavors of Vietnamese dishes like banh mi and pho. Those clinging to tradition can also opt for classics like margherita or pepperoni here, best accompanied by a side of yuzu ranch.

Magna Kubo

Chef Carlo Lamagna’s west side expansion takes the form of a lechoneria, focused on the genre of Filipino rotisserie meats. At the counter service spot, diners choose from main proteins like lemongrass-marinated chicken, crispy pork belly, barbecue ribs, or a rotating deep fried fish to go along with rice, sinamak (house-made vinegar), and atchara (Filipino pickles). Save room for a sweet finish — the restaurant’s halo halo comes topped with ube ice cream and house-made leche flan.

Pip's Original Doughnuts & Chai

At this Broadway Street mini doughnut emporium, the bite-sized treats are fried-to-order before getting dusted with sparkly cinnamon sugar, drizzled with Nutella, or dolloped with seasonal toppings like banana custard, mango ghost pepper jam, or brandied apple butter. Mix and match flavors and wash the doughnuts down with a cup of the shop’s house-made chai, made in small batches in flavors like Heart of Gold (toasted coconut, turmeric, sencha, assam) or the caffeine-free Emmylou (lavender, chamomile, chrysanthemum, fennel).

Related Maps

Don's Favorite Foods

Beaverton is home to very few restaurants that offer prix fixe or tasting menus, but this new, intimate Italian American restaurant from the man behind Burger Stevens is filling the void beautifully. Meals begin with a flurry of antipasti — things like calamari salad or sesame popovers — followed by courses like sausage arancini, rigatoni alla vodka, and eggplant Parmesan. Mains are often showstoppers, whether it’s a stuffed veal breast with rapini caponata or filet mignon in cognac au poivre. Menus change monthly, generally clocking in at $95 per person. Make a reservation ahead of time.

Top Burmese Bistro Royale

The Beaverton location of this Portland-based Burmese restaurant group may be one of its most popular: In a lush dining room filled with monsteras and pothos, visitors drink flower-topped cocktails while waiting for plates of sweet mango wings and crispy, golden-fried samosas. Regulars typically head straight for the thokes, tea leaf salads dotted with nuts and seeds, though the restaurant’s nuanced coconut noodle soup — the restaurant’s take on khow suey, a relative of Southeast Asian soups like laksa and khao soi — is a perpetually popular hit.

Nak Won Korean Restaurant

Nak Won has been running since 2001 with an expansive variety of Korean staples, including an incredible seafood pancake. The menu is fun and quirky, with dishes named When Miss Piggy Met Hot Potato and Ice Ice Babe, and includes everything from dumplings to kimchi stew to table-top Korean barbecue. The room is a little dark (the ceiling is low and painted black), but it never feels cramped and is brightened by K-pop videos playing on wall-mounted TV screens. 

1st Street Pocha

This charming Korean spot on — of course – 1st Street is the city’s one-stop shop for Korean street food staples, including plump, panko-fried Korean corn dogs with satisfyingly cheesy mozzarella filling, as well as steamy-spicy soups like jjamppong. However, most of 1st Street Pocha’s devotees are there for the fried chicken, crispy-crusted wings doused in sticky marinades or served dry and well-seasoned. Order them with both sauces, with a few sides of kimchi for good measure.

Related Maps