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A man stands inside the dining room of Boriken.
Samuel Vazquez, owner of Boriken.
City of Beaverton

16 Exemplary Restaurants in Beaverton

Find the best restaurants on Portland's westside

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Samuel Vazquez, owner of Boriken.
| City of Beaverton

Since it’s home to some of the largest employers in the area, it stands to reason that a wealth of dining options should be available just west of Portland. What was once home to only chains and the occasional noteworthy mom-and-pop is now a neighborhood on the rise: Established Portland restaurants continue to set up new Beaverton branches, while some of the area’s most interesting restaurants continue to call Beaverton home, including the state’s most expansive Indian food scene and one of its only Puerto Rican restaurants. It comes, then, as no surprise that local that local cider tycoon Nat West of Rev Nat’s Cider called it the “...best food city in Oregon. No joke.”

Continue on to find all the best spots for rich and spicy curries, soul-soothing bowls of ramen, Detroit-style pizza, and mofongo by the mouthful. For more westside dining options, check out our Hillsboro map.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Apna Chat Bhavan

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Next to the Oregon Food Bank on 173rd and Cornell Road, tucked inside an Indian grocery store, is essentially a deli counter hawking spectacular curry and rice dishes, along with broad dosas and flavorful samosas. The move here is most definitely the Gongura goat curry, which gets its tart and punchy flavor from sorrel leaves.

Taste of Sichuan Beaverton

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Taste of Sichuan, a sprawling restaurant with numerous round tables topped with lazy susans for large groups, balances Americanized and more traditional Chinese plates. The fantastic soup dumplings or chow mein with hand-shaved noodles are always reliable, but those feeling adventurous can order from the Wild Side menu. The popcorn chicken-like Chongqing chicken offers the tongue-numbing power of Sichuan peppers, while other Wild Side staples include sour and spicy jellyfish, chile-sauce-marinated fu chi beef, and Sichuan-style crab, made with live crab.

India Sweets & Spices

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India Sweets & Spices has much in common with Apna Chat Bhavan due to its grocery store-meets-counter service hybrid model. They both serve chaats and thalis, as well as bature, a fried puffy bread served with chickpea curry. The move here, however, is to order a pile of mithai, those often syrup-soaked, sometimes colorful, fudgy Indian sweets that aren’t often found in the Portland area. Treats like burfi, rasgulla, ladoo, and kajoo rolls are available by the pound. 

Kizuki Ramen & Izakaya

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This Tokyo-founded ramen brand is one of many ramen shops in the Beaverton area, though we love Kizuki for its luscious tonkotsu base, well-complemented by the ramen shop’s black garlic oil. The stock here gets a 16-hour simmer, for maximum depth of flavor, with a pile of springy noodles and thinly sliced chashu. The restaurant’s izakaya menu includes classic dishes like takoyaki, onigiri, and agadashi tofu.

Oyatsupan Bakers

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Oyatsupan, an airy, upscale bakery, makes a wide array of traditional Japanese breads, pastries, and sandwiches. Pastries are often as fun as they are delicious, like the chocolate cornet, filled with chocolate-custard cream and finished with frosting eyeballs so the whole delicious thing looks like a surprised caterpillar. Those looking for something savory can find items like a tonkatsu slider with fried pork filet or the kare doughnut, filled with beef curry.

In Da Cutz Grill and Catering

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In an assuming location behind a Filipino market off of TV Highway lies this Hawaiian plate lunch spot. The menu is straightforward: Choose from three sizes of plates, with one or two proteins and a few sides depending on size. The move here is the surf and turf, with crispy fried shrimp and impeccably seared pieces of medium rare steak, along with classic sides like mac salad, kimchi, rice, or french fries.

Decarli restaurant

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Now that Decarli has moved out of the car-free dining hotbed of Old Town Beaverton and over to Hall Road, folks looking for creamy risotto and crispy bruschetta might actually have a shot at getting a table there without reserving days ahead. Although this is a premier spot for pizza and pasta, alongside other upscale offerings, it’s the cioppino that is the must-have: a steamy-rich bowl of West Coast seafood stew, best sopped up with the accompanying slab of rustic bread.

A bowl of seafood stew is seen in a bowl along with bread at Decarli in Beaverton.
Cioppino at Decarli.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

The Westgate Bourbon Bar & Taphouse

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Home to one of the largest whisky selections in town, The Westgate also has a massive taplist of outstanding West Coast beer, along with a tight and well-crafted food menu. The chef burgers here are a standout, topped with everything from capicola to pineapple. It also features a beautiful billiard room and a good-sized bottle shop filled with beers from all over Oregon.

A hamburger and fries are shown on a white plate.
The Spicy Situation from the Westgate.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Happy Lamb Hotpot

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Sharing the same strip mall that used to house Jin Wah (r.i.p.), Happy Lamb Hotpot is the first Oregon outpost of a Chinese hot pot chain. The restaurant is big — 210-seat big — and modern. Diners can go à la carte or all-you-can-eat, and just need to fill out a card with what they want to dip into the bubbling broth. The yin-yang soup base is exemplary, with one side chili-oil-fiery, the other mild and milky, spiked with goji berries and jujubes.

Afuri and Ramen Ryoma are worthy places to get a Japanese noodle fix in Beaverton, but Yuzu, with its counter seating and slightly hidden location, feels the most like visiting Japan. The restaurant offers a few izakaya starters, as well as multiple styles of ramen. The signature is the Kakuni ramen, with a rich tonkotsu base, bamboo shoots, pickled ginger, wakame, a slice of chasu, plus stewed chunks of pork belly if that wasn’t enough. 

A bowl is ramen soup is shown in a black bowl.
Kakuni Ramen from Yuzu.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Ome Calli

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This from-scratch ice cream stop that stands out on Canyon Road with its brightly painted exterior and Aztec god mural has classic flavors as well as cream and ice pops (paletas) packed with Latin American fruit like guanabana, zapote, guava, and mango. Pick from the menu or just peer into the refrigerated cases at the counter and see which frozen treat appeals. Ome Calli also makes a Mexican specialty, chamoyada: a styrofoam cup rimmed with lime juice and chile powder is filled with shaved ice, then a paleta gets thrown in for good measure and the whole thing is topped with chamoy, a salty, sour sauce made from pickled plums and chile powder. Pulparindo, Tama Roca, and other tamarind candies come on the side.

Borikén Restaurant

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The Pacific Northwest isn’t exactly a hotbed of Caribbean cuisine, but if the urge for tostones or arroz con pollo hits, there’s always Borikén, a casual restaurant that transmits the tropics with its lime green and sunny orange palette. The mofongo is a standout, a dish of fried plantains mashed with chicharrones, often formed into a softball-sized orb, and topped with meat or seafood. Here, it is served in a traditional pilón de madera (wooden pestle) and fillings of choice are piled in. It’s best with a few dashes of mojo de ajo.

Ex Novo Brewing Company

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With its flagship location in Portland, and now a third location in New Mexico, Ex Novo Brewing shows no signs of slowing down, making sours and all types of IPAs that still manage to standout in such a crowded field here in town. While its Portland precinct pumps out a handful of six-inch pies, this location is a proper piehall first and foremost, offering both six- and eight-inch sizes of its 10 different pies, along with make-your-own options. The sauce and cheese sit atop thick, pillowy crusts with crispy edges and dripping with olive oil. Paired with a west coast IPA, this is east-meets-west in the best way possible.

A bar and taplist are shown, lit with both indoor and natural lighting
Ex Novo Beaverton
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Top Burmese Bistro Royale

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The Beaverton location of this Burmese restaurant group may be one of its most popular: In a lush dining room filled with monsteras and pothos, visitors drink flower-topped cocktails while waiting for plates of sweet mango wings and crispy, light samosas. Regulars typically head straight for the thokes, tea leaf salads dotted with nuts and seeds, though the restaurant’s nuanced coconut noodle soup — the restaurant’s take on khow suey, a relative of Southeast Asian soups like laksa and khao soi — is a perpetually popular hit. The ideal summer meal ends with a frosty strawberry falooda.

Nak Won Korean Restaurant

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Nak Won has been running since 2001 with an expansive variety of Korean staples, including an incredible seafood pancake. The menu fun and quirky, with dishes named When Miss Piggy Met Hot Potato and Ice Ice Babe, and includes everything from dumplings to kimchi stew to table-top Korean barbecue. The room is a little dark (the ceiling is low and painted black), but it never feels cramped and is brightened by K-pop videos playing on wall-mounted TV screens. 

1st Street Pocha

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This charming Korean spot on — of course – 1st Street is the city’s one-stop shop for Korean street food staples, including plump, panko-fried Korean corn dogs with satisfyingly cheesy mozzarella filling, as well as steamy-spicy soups like jjamppong. However, most of 1st Street Pocha’s devotees are there for the fried chicken, crispy-crusted wings doused in sticky marinades or served dry and well-seasoned. Order them with both sauces, with a few sides of kimchi for good measure.

Apna Chat Bhavan

Next to the Oregon Food Bank on 173rd and Cornell Road, tucked inside an Indian grocery store, is essentially a deli counter hawking spectacular curry and rice dishes, along with broad dosas and flavorful samosas. The move here is most definitely the Gongura goat curry, which gets its tart and punchy flavor from sorrel leaves.

Taste of Sichuan Beaverton

Taste of Sichuan, a sprawling restaurant with numerous round tables topped with lazy susans for large groups, balances Americanized and more traditional Chinese plates. The fantastic soup dumplings or chow mein with hand-shaved noodles are always reliable, but those feeling adventurous can order from the Wild Side menu. The popcorn chicken-like Chongqing chicken offers the tongue-numbing power of Sichuan peppers, while other Wild Side staples include sour and spicy jellyfish, chile-sauce-marinated fu chi beef, and Sichuan-style crab, made with live crab.

India Sweets & Spices

India Sweets & Spices has much in common with Apna Chat Bhavan due to its grocery store-meets-counter service hybrid model. They both serve chaats and thalis, as well as bature, a fried puffy bread served with chickpea curry. The move here, however, is to order a pile of mithai, those often syrup-soaked, sometimes colorful, fudgy Indian sweets that aren’t often found in the Portland area. Treats like burfi, rasgulla, ladoo, and kajoo rolls are available by the pound. 

Kizuki Ramen & Izakaya

This Tokyo-founded ramen brand is one of many ramen shops in the Beaverton area, though we love Kizuki for its luscious tonkotsu base, well-complemented by the ramen shop’s black garlic oil. The stock here gets a 16-hour simmer, for maximum depth of flavor, with a pile of springy noodles and thinly sliced chashu. The restaurant’s izakaya menu includes classic dishes like takoyaki, onigiri, and agadashi tofu.

Oyatsupan Bakers

Oyatsupan, an airy, upscale bakery, makes a wide array of traditional Japanese breads, pastries, and sandwiches. Pastries are often as fun as they are delicious, like the chocolate cornet, filled with chocolate-custard cream and finished with frosting eyeballs so the whole delicious thing looks like a surprised caterpillar. Those looking for something savory can find items like a tonkatsu slider with fried pork filet or the kare doughnut, filled with beef curry.

In Da Cutz Grill and Catering

In an assuming location behind a Filipino market off of TV Highway lies this Hawaiian plate lunch spot. The menu is straightforward: Choose from three sizes of plates, with one or two proteins and a few sides depending on size. The move here is the surf and turf, with crispy fried shrimp and impeccably seared pieces of medium rare steak, along with classic sides like mac salad, kimchi, rice, or french fries.

Decarli restaurant

A bowl of seafood stew is seen in a bowl along with bread at Decarli in Beaverton.
Cioppino at Decarli.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Now that Decarli has moved out of the car-free dining hotbed of Old Town Beaverton and over to Hall Road, folks looking for creamy risotto and crispy bruschetta might actually have a shot at getting a table there without reserving days ahead. Although this is a premier spot for pizza and pasta, alongside other upscale offerings, it’s the cioppino that is the must-have: a steamy-rich bowl of West Coast seafood stew, best sopped up with the accompanying slab of rustic bread.

A bowl of seafood stew is seen in a bowl along with bread at Decarli in Beaverton.
Cioppino at Decarli.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

The Westgate Bourbon Bar & Taphouse

A hamburger and fries are shown on a white plate.
The Spicy Situation from the Westgate.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Home to one of the largest whisky selections in town, The Westgate also has a massive taplist of outstanding West Coast beer, along with a tight and well-crafted food menu. The chef burgers here are a standout, topped with everything from capicola to pineapple. It also features a beautiful billiard room and a good-sized bottle shop filled with beers from all over Oregon.

A hamburger and fries are shown on a white plate.
The Spicy Situation from the Westgate.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Happy Lamb Hotpot

Sharing the same strip mall that used to house Jin Wah (r.i.p.), Happy Lamb Hotpot is the first Oregon outpost of a Chinese hot pot chain. The restaurant is big — 210-seat big — and modern. Diners can go à la carte or all-you-can-eat, and just need to fill out a card with what they want to dip into the bubbling broth. The yin-yang soup base is exemplary, with one side chili-oil-fiery, the other mild and milky, spiked with goji berries and jujubes.

Yuzu

A bowl is ramen soup is shown in a black bowl.
Kakuni Ramen from Yuzu.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Afuri and Ramen Ryoma are worthy places to get a Japanese noodle fix in Beaverton, but Yuzu, with its counter seating and slightly hidden location, feels the most like visiting Japan. The restaurant offers a few izakaya starters, as well as multiple styles of ramen. The signature is the Kakuni ramen, with a rich tonkotsu base, bamboo shoots, pickled ginger, wakame, a slice of chasu, plus stewed chunks of pork belly if that wasn’t enough. 

A bowl is ramen soup is shown in a black bowl.
Kakuni Ramen from Yuzu.
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Ome Calli

This from-scratch ice cream stop that stands out on Canyon Road with its brightly painted exterior and Aztec god mural has classic flavors as well as cream and ice pops (paletas) packed with Latin American fruit like guanabana, zapote, guava, and mango. Pick from the menu or just peer into the refrigerated cases at the counter and see which frozen treat appeals. Ome Calli also makes a Mexican specialty, chamoyada: a styrofoam cup rimmed with lime juice and chile powder is filled with shaved ice, then a paleta gets thrown in for good measure and the whole thing is topped with chamoy, a salty, sour sauce made from pickled plums and chile powder. Pulparindo, Tama Roca, and other tamarind candies come on the side.

Borikén Restaurant

The Pacific Northwest isn’t exactly a hotbed of Caribbean cuisine, but if the urge for tostones or arroz con pollo hits, there’s always Borikén, a casual restaurant that transmits the tropics with its lime green and sunny orange palette. The mofongo is a standout, a dish of fried plantains mashed with chicharrones, often formed into a softball-sized orb, and topped with meat or seafood. Here, it is served in a traditional pilón de madera (wooden pestle) and fillings of choice are piled in. It’s best with a few dashes of mojo de ajo.

Ex Novo Brewing Company

A bar and taplist are shown, lit with both indoor and natural lighting
Ex Novo Beaverton
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

With its flagship location in Portland, and now a third location in New Mexico, Ex Novo Brewing shows no signs of slowing down, making sours and all types of IPAs that still manage to standout in such a crowded field here in town. While its Portland precinct pumps out a handful of six-inch pies, this location is a proper piehall first and foremost, offering both six- and eight-inch sizes of its 10 different pies, along with make-your-own options. The sauce and cheese sit atop thick, pillowy crusts with crispy edges and dripping with olive oil. Paired with a west coast IPA, this is east-meets-west in the best way possible.

A bar and taplist are shown, lit with both indoor and natural lighting
Ex Novo Beaverton
Ron Scott/Eater Portland

Top Burmese Bistro Royale

The Beaverton location of this Burmese restaurant group may be one of its most popular: In a lush dining room filled with monsteras and pothos, visitors drink flower-topped cocktails while waiting for plates of sweet mango wings and crispy, light samosas. Regulars typically head straight for the thokes, tea leaf salads dotted with nuts and seeds, though the restaurant’s nuanced coconut noodle soup — the restaurant’s take on khow suey, a relative of Southeast Asian soups like laksa and khao soi — is a perpetually popular hit. The ideal summer meal ends with a frosty strawberry falooda.

Nak Won Korean Restaurant

Nak Won has been running since 2001 with an expansive variety of Korean staples, including an incredible seafood pancake. The menu fun and quirky, with dishes named When Miss Piggy Met Hot Potato and Ice Ice Babe, and includes everything from dumplings to kimchi stew to table-top Korean barbecue. The room is a little dark (the ceiling is low and painted black), but it never feels cramped and is brightened by K-pop videos playing on wall-mounted TV screens. 

Related Maps

1st Street Pocha

This charming Korean spot on — of course – 1st Street is the city’s one-stop shop for Korean street food staples, including plump, panko-fried Korean corn dogs with satisfyingly cheesy mozzarella filling, as well as steamy-spicy soups like jjamppong. However, most of 1st Street Pocha’s devotees are there for the fried chicken, crispy-crusted wings doused in sticky marinades or served dry and well-seasoned. Order them with both sauces, with a few sides of kimchi for good measure.

Related Maps