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A white plate comes covered in tuna and salmon nigiri, scallop and yellowtail sashimi, and a yuzu scallop roll.
Sushi takeout from Zilla Sake
Brooke Jackson-Glidden / EPDX

Where to Eat and Drink on Alberta

Find the restaurants, bars, and cafes that make this neighborhood tick

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Sushi takeout from Zilla Sake
| Brooke Jackson-Glidden / EPDX

Northeast Alberta, historically, was one of Portland’s more diverse neighborhoods. Today, it looks drastically different from how it did just a few decades ago. As the “Alberta Arts District” developed, housing prices soared, changing the foundation of the neighborhood. Now, only a fraction of the Portland residents on Northeast Alberta are people of color, shrinking exponentially as the area develops.

However, the neighborhood’s retail sector has fought to remain diverse, holding on to longstanding institutions like Alberta Market and creating diverse redevelopments on the corridor, like Alberta Commons as the home of Cason’s Fine Meats. Buzzy spots like Mama Dut and Deadstock Coffee are eyeing Alberta for expansion, and the last year’s turnover on the street has opened up spaces for first-time business owners.

The neighborhood dining scene, then, is a multifaceted arena with an array of countries represented. Cantonese barbecue shares a block with an Oregon-specific butcher shop and restaurant; a single food cart pod offers fancy sandwiches alongside Oaxacan moles. The map below dives into the some of finest dining and drinking on Alberta as it stands today, from the corner store serving fried chicken and jojos to the subterranean wine bar serving dealer’s choice pours.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Alberta Market

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Alberta Market, a longstanding corner store with the expected bags of chips and sodas in the back coolers, is a fried chicken hotspot for those in the know. At the cash register, a hot case shows off juicy, crispy-fried wings available by the scoopful, particularly tasty with a side of not-too-dry jojos.

Bole Ethiopian Restaurant

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Bole is one of Portland’s most underrated Ethiopian restaurants, thanks to its surprisingly delicate injera and gently spiced wots. Vegetarians will find a number of exceptional options here, from the nuanced spice of the miser wot to the house-made ayib cheese. Like many Ethiopian restaurants, Bole offers combinations of stews and braises over injera, likely the best way to experience the restaurant. It’s open for takeout.

Pasture PDX

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Pasture’s arrival on Alberta harkens back to the golden age of Portland’s hyper-local food movement in a way that feels wholly original and new. Chef Kei Ohdera and butcher John Schaible source meats and produce from ranchers and farmers based in Oregon, specifically those with a focus on regenerative agriculture. The dishes made from those ingredients, however, stand on their own as some of the city’s best: Lunches consist of tender pink pastrami or sumac-marinated duck sandwiches with a wisp of smoke, while evening takeout “bentos” show off the best of what’s in the butcher case. Visitors can also take home some of the butcher shop’s meats, as well as assorted local jams and spreads.

Tin Shed

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In the old days, Tin Shed was one of Portland’s longest lines for brunch; today, the all-week brunch spot remains a neighborhood haunt, whether it’s for bowls of macaroni and cheese or piles of scrambled eggs. Those willing to brave the morning wait should try one of the restaurant’s stacks: egg scrambles over grits or potato cakes, often smothered in mushroom gravy. The restaurant is also open for takeout, and takes reservations for its patio and garden seating.

YaYa Cantonese BBQ

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Chef Steven Chin is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to Chinese food in the United States, and after years of working on the New York Chinese History Project, he’s opened his own Cantonese barbecue restaurant in Northeast Portland. At Ya Ya, the move is to bee-line straight for the duck, air-dried, glazed, and roasted for the right balance of juicy meat and seasoned skin. When duck is off the menu, the restaurant’s soya sauce chicken is a worthy replacement. Ya Ya offers takeout and outdoor dining.

Wild Thing PDX

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Getting excited about a build-your-own bowl place can be difficult to do, but the menu at Wild Thing isn’t your average Sweetgreen situation: Instead, bowls of tri-colored quinoa arrive topped with miso-roasted turnips and cumin carrots, mixed green salads pair urfa chili sweet potato and sumac cabbage, and Never Coffee chia pudding gets a swirl of vanilla cashew ‘cream.’ Plus, the shop’s wine list is surprisingly great, thanks to owner Kelsey Glasser, who also owns Pearl District wine bar Arden. Wild Thing offers onsite dining as well as takeout.

Tacos Pa Ella

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There are several noteworthy carts in the Bantu Island Food Cart Pod, including the deeply underrated Tacos Pa Ella. Soft and lightly griddled tortillas become vehicles for a pile of bright and lively salsas, veggies, and slaws, from the pineapple salsa on a fish taco to a saucy mess of onions on a marinated pastor-style pork. The stacked tortas are a good choice for someone seeking something more filling.

Les Caves & Le Clos

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Wine nerds adore this subterranean bar from the team behind two of Portland’s buzziest labels (Ovum and Golden Cluster). Don’t expect an Oregon-heavy wine list, however: Sitting on a couch perched in a literal cave carved into the wall, visitors choose glass pours of gruner Veltliner from Austria, hard-to-find varietals from Hungary or Croatia, as well as pretty syrah and Beaujolais. Those looking for a surprise should opt for the Winesman’s Pick, an off-menu selection from Golden Cluster’s Jeff Vejr. Those intimidated by an indoor tasting moment can go to Les Clos, the outdoor alternative to Les Caves. Reservations are recommended.

In its Alberta Street restaurant, Gumba serves expertly crafted bowls of pasta — topped with things like braised short rib or house burrata — alongside fry bread and slices of olive oil cake. Even after leaving their original cart behind, owners Robin Brassaw and Jesse Martinez have shown themselves to be two of the city’s finest chefs while retaining their sense of culinary whimsy. Gumba is open for takeout, with indoor reservations, as well.

Zilla Sake

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Chef Kate Koo still stands behind the sushi counter at this sake bar and restaurant, slicing Hokkaido scallops or lightly searing pieces of bigeye tuna, and the sushi is just as mind-boggling as it was in the Great Before. The yuzu scallop roll is creamy with the most delicate oceanic note; the wild Chinook nigiri retains that mystifying flavor of whitewater; and the yellowtail sashimi offers a bracing citrusy element that plays off the shiso it lies against. Zilla takes orders via online order, as well as reservations.

Proud Mary Cafe

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This Australian outpost is known for its exceptional coffee roasts and its outstanding brunch fare, often utilizing interesting fermented elements and umami-bombs. Now, Proud Mary has altered its menu to be more takeout friendly: The bagna-cauda-laden hash is available as something like a breakfast burrito, and the granola comes in bags to take home. Still, Proud Mary still supplies Portlanders with the standbys for onsite dining: ricotta hotcakes drizzled in orange syrup, French toast with sumac-poached figs, and, of course, the delicate house-roasted coffees. It’s open for onsite dining, as well as takeout and delivery.

GrindWitTryz

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When it opened, this Hawaiian food-cart-turned-restaurant accrued lines that rivaled 2012-era Salt & Straw, which it neighbors. There’s a good reason why: GrindWitTryz’s takeout containers, which strain to close, come filled with juicy tangles of kalua pig, craggy morsels of sweet ono chicken, and fat curls of shrimp doused in garlic butter. The specials board usually sports some cool one-offs worth an order, be it Filipino spaghetti or crispy ahi patties. It’s open mainly for walk-ups and dine-in. Keep an eye on the restaurant’s Instagram for more info.

Maillard

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Nostrana alum Andrew Gillis opened this food cart that specializes in distinctive Portland sandwiches: candied bacon and jalapeño chevre with apple slaw, vegan cauliflower with arugula chimichurri, pork loin with provolone and roasted onions. The cart’s pastries are a must, as well, with options like panna cotta with passionfruit curd or cara cara shortbread with caramel and chocolate.

Paladin Pie

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Portland is home to countless phenomenal pizzerias, but this little cart on Alberta is no joke: A naturally leavened crust serves as the foundation for pies topped with curly Ezzo pepperonis or the genius combination of kimchi and bacon. Any pie should get a drizzle of the cart’s Calabrian chile crisp.

Mole Mole Mexican Cuisine

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This food cart pod is stacked with a number of strong carts, but when craving enchiladas blanketed in mole poblano or lengua tacos on hand-made tortillas. Mole is generally the move here, whether it’s a chicken quarter doused in pistachio-green mole verde or even a little mole-filled taco. Beverages include a variety of aguas frescas.

La Bonita

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The argument over which makes the better Alberta burrito, La Bonita or La Sirenita, is real. But La Bonita makes this list for its cheerful digs and well-priced burritos, especially the breakfast and chile relleno varieties. Plus, any burrito can arrive smothered in mole, which generally goes over exceptionally well. The restaurant is open for takeout, delivery, and indoor dining, and takes orders via phone or online portal.

T.C. O'Leary's

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This homey, real-deal Irish pub always has something going on — live music, a book club, a Red Sox game. The food here hits all of the comfort food pleasure centers, be it the shop’s curry fries, the hake fish and chips, or a hearty shepherd’s pie. Any of the above would be a fine accompaniment to a pint of Kilkenny or Guinness.

Dar Salam

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Set in an old carriage house, the colorful Dar Salam is the place to taste Iraqi food like stuffed onion dolmas, all freshly prepared from scratch and mostly built from family recipes. The restaurant’s smoky baba ganoush is an essential order, as well as the tangy pickled mango salad and crispy falafel, molded into tiny doughnuts for maximum crunchy surface area. The restaurant is open for takeout, but the real move is to grab one of the restaurant’s charming a-frames for a dinner.

Urdaneta

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A true taste of the Basque region, Urdaneta delivers quintessential pintxo bar classics like ham croquetas and tortilla Española. However, the restaurant really shines with goofy, creative versions of those dishes, like the American cheese and jamon bikini. Currently, Urdaneta is open for indoor dining by reservation, as well as outdoor walk-ins.

Thơm Portland

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The menu at this Alberta Vietnamese restaurant may be tiny, but each dish on the menu is a hit: gorgeous bowls of pho, either beefy or vegan; a glazed pork vermicelli bowl with a generous serving of nước chấm; and cơm gà, hunks of tender glazed chicken over rice and vegetables. The restaurant’s market includes snacks like shrimp chips and Pocky, and the cooler is stocked with basil seed drinks. Visit for dine-in, indoors or out.

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Alberta Market

Alberta Market, a longstanding corner store with the expected bags of chips and sodas in the back coolers, is a fried chicken hotspot for those in the know. At the cash register, a hot case shows off juicy, crispy-fried wings available by the scoopful, particularly tasty with a side of not-too-dry jojos.

Bole Ethiopian Restaurant

Bole is one of Portland’s most underrated Ethiopian restaurants, thanks to its surprisingly delicate injera and gently spiced wots. Vegetarians will find a number of exceptional options here, from the nuanced spice of the miser wot to the house-made ayib cheese. Like many Ethiopian restaurants, Bole offers combinations of stews and braises over injera, likely the best way to experience the restaurant. It’s open for takeout.

Pasture PDX

Pasture’s arrival on Alberta harkens back to the golden age of Portland’s hyper-local food movement in a way that feels wholly original and new. Chef Kei Ohdera and butcher John Schaible source meats and produce from ranchers and farmers based in Oregon, specifically those with a focus on regenerative agriculture. The dishes made from those ingredients, however, stand on their own as some of the city’s best: Lunches consist of tender pink pastrami or sumac-marinated duck sandwiches with a wisp of smoke, while evening takeout “bentos” show off the best of what’s in the butcher case. Visitors can also take home some of the butcher shop’s meats, as well as assorted local jams and spreads.

Tin Shed

In the old days, Tin Shed was one of Portland’s longest lines for brunch; today, the all-week brunch spot remains a neighborhood haunt, whether it’s for bowls of macaroni and cheese or piles of scrambled eggs. Those willing to brave the morning wait should try one of the restaurant’s stacks: egg scrambles over grits or potato cakes, often smothered in mushroom gravy. The restaurant is also open for takeout, and takes reservations for its patio and garden seating.

YaYa Cantonese BBQ

Chef Steven Chin is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to Chinese food in the United States, and after years of working on the New York Chinese History Project, he’s opened his own Cantonese barbecue restaurant in Northeast Portland. At Ya Ya, the move is to bee-line straight for the duck, air-dried, glazed, and roasted for the right balance of juicy meat and seasoned skin. When duck is off the menu, the restaurant’s soya sauce chicken is a worthy replacement. Ya Ya offers takeout and outdoor dining.

Wild Thing PDX

Getting excited about a build-your-own bowl place can be difficult to do, but the menu at Wild Thing isn’t your average Sweetgreen situation: Instead, bowls of tri-colored quinoa arrive topped with miso-roasted turnips and cumin carrots, mixed green salads pair urfa chili sweet potato and sumac cabbage, and Never Coffee chia pudding gets a swirl of vanilla cashew ‘cream.’ Plus, the shop’s wine list is surprisingly great, thanks to owner Kelsey Glasser, who also owns Pearl District wine bar Arden. Wild Thing offers onsite dining as well as takeout.

Tacos Pa Ella

There are several noteworthy carts in the Bantu Island Food Cart Pod, including the deeply underrated Tacos Pa Ella. Soft and lightly griddled tortillas become vehicles for a pile of bright and lively salsas, veggies, and slaws, from the pineapple salsa on a fish taco to a saucy mess of onions on a marinated pastor-style pork. The stacked tortas are a good choice for someone seeking something more filling.

Les Caves & Le Clos

Wine nerds adore this subterranean bar from the team behind two of Portland’s buzziest labels (Ovum and Golden Cluster). Don’t expect an Oregon-heavy wine list, however: Sitting on a couch perched in a literal cave carved into the wall, visitors choose glass pours of gruner Veltliner from Austria, hard-to-find varietals from Hungary or Croatia, as well as pretty syrah and Beaujolais. Those looking for a surprise should opt for the Winesman’s Pick, an off-menu selection from Golden Cluster’s Jeff Vejr. Those intimidated by an indoor tasting moment can go to Les Clos, the outdoor alternative to Les Caves. Reservations are recommended.

Gumba

In its Alberta Street restaurant, Gumba serves expertly crafted bowls of pasta — topped with things like braised short rib or house burrata — alongside fry bread and slices of olive oil cake. Even after leaving their original cart behind, owners Robin Brassaw and Jesse Martinez have shown themselves to be two of the city’s finest chefs while retaining their sense of culinary whimsy. Gumba is open for takeout, with indoor reservations, as well.

Zilla Sake

Chef Kate Koo still stands behind the sushi counter at this sake bar and restaurant, slicing Hokkaido scallops or lightly searing pieces of bigeye tuna, and the sushi is just as mind-boggling as it was in the Great Before. The yuzu scallop roll is creamy with the most delicate oceanic note; the wild Chinook nigiri retains that mystifying flavor of whitewater; and the yellowtail sashimi offers a bracing citrusy element that plays off the shiso it lies against. Zilla takes orders via online order, as well as reservations.

Proud Mary Cafe

This Australian outpost is known for its exceptional coffee roasts and its outstanding brunch fare, often utilizing interesting fermented elements and umami-bombs. Now, Proud Mary has altered its menu to be more takeout friendly: The bagna-cauda-laden hash is available as something like a breakfast burrito, and the granola comes in bags to take home. Still, Proud Mary still supplies Portlanders with the standbys for onsite dining: ricotta hotcakes drizzled in orange syrup, French toast with sumac-poached figs, and, of course, the delicate house-roasted coffees. It’s open for onsite dining, as well as takeout and delivery.

GrindWitTryz

When it opened, this Hawaiian food-cart-turned-restaurant accrued lines that rivaled 2012-era Salt & Straw, which it neighbors. There’s a good reason why: GrindWitTryz’s takeout containers, which strain to close, come filled with juicy tangles of kalua pig, craggy morsels of sweet ono chicken, and fat curls of shrimp doused in garlic butter. The specials board usually sports some cool one-offs worth an order, be it Filipino spaghetti or crispy ahi patties. It’s open mainly for walk-ups and dine-in. Keep an eye on the restaurant’s Instagram for more info.

Maillard

Nostrana alum Andrew Gillis opened this food cart that specializes in distinctive Portland sandwiches: candied bacon and jalapeño chevre with apple slaw, vegan cauliflower with arugula chimichurri, pork loin with provolone and roasted onions. The cart’s pastries are a must, as well, with options like panna cotta with passionfruit curd or cara cara shortbread with caramel and chocolate.

Paladin Pie

Portland is home to countless phenomenal pizzerias, but this little cart on Alberta is no joke: A naturally leavened crust serves as the foundation for pies topped with curly Ezzo pepperonis or the genius combination of kimchi and bacon. Any pie should get a drizzle of the cart’s Calabrian chile crisp.

Mole Mole Mexican Cuisine

This food cart pod is stacked with a number of strong carts, but when craving enchiladas blanketed in mole poblano or lengua tacos on hand-made tortillas. Mole is generally the move here, whether it’s a chicken quarter doused in pistachio-green mole verde or even a little mole-filled taco. Beverages include a variety of aguas frescas.

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La Bonita

The argument over which makes the better Alberta burrito, La Bonita or La Sirenita, is real. But La Bonita makes this list for its cheerful digs and well-priced burritos, especially the breakfast and chile relleno varieties. Plus, any burrito can arrive smothered in mole, which generally goes over exceptionally well. The restaurant is open for takeout, delivery, and indoor dining, and takes orders via phone or online portal.

T.C. O'Leary's

This homey, real-deal Irish pub always has something going on — live music, a book club, a Red Sox game. The food here hits all of the comfort food pleasure centers, be it the shop’s curry fries, the hake fish and chips, or a hearty shepherd’s pie. Any of the above would be a fine accompaniment to a pint of Kilkenny or Guinness.

Dar Salam

Set in an old carriage house, the colorful Dar Salam is the place to taste Iraqi food like stuffed onion dolmas, all freshly prepared from scratch and mostly built from family recipes. The restaurant’s smoky baba ganoush is an essential order, as well as the tangy pickled mango salad and crispy falafel, molded into tiny doughnuts for maximum crunchy surface area. The restaurant is open for takeout, but the real move is to grab one of the restaurant’s charming a-frames for a dinner.

Urdaneta

A true taste of the Basque region, Urdaneta delivers quintessential pintxo bar classics like ham croquetas and tortilla Española. However, the restaurant really shines with goofy, creative versions of those dishes, like the American cheese and jamon bikini. Currently, Urdaneta is open for indoor dining by reservation, as well as outdoor walk-ins.

Thơm Portland

The menu at this Alberta Vietnamese restaurant may be tiny, but each dish on the menu is a hit: gorgeous bowls of pho, either beefy or vegan; a glazed pork vermicelli bowl with a generous serving of nước chấm; and cơm gà, hunks of tender glazed chicken over rice and vegetables. The restaurant’s market includes snacks like shrimp chips and Pocky, and the cooler is stocked with basil seed drinks. Visit for dine-in, indoors or out.

Related Maps