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A clear bowl of chunky red and yellow gazpacho, topped with fresh micro greens.
Hand-grated tomato gazpacho at Bar Casa Vale.
Nathan Williams / Eater Portland

12 Portland Spots Where You Can Sip Cold, Refreshing Gazpacho

Tomato season and peak summer temperatures make for prime gazpacho conditions

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Hand-grated tomato gazpacho at Bar Casa Vale.
| Nathan Williams / Eater Portland

There are few dishes that define summer more perfectly than gazpacho, a dish traditionally comprised of uncooked tomato, cucumber, onion, and olive oil, served on the hottest days of summer on the Iberian Peninsula. Not only do peak-ripe tomatoes elevate a classic gazpacho rojo from tasty to transcendent, but a cold bowl of gazpacho strikes a deeper chord on a sweltering summer day — that weather so hot and dry produces the juiciest, sweetest tomatoes connects us to an unconscious sort of hope. Find your summer joy in a bowl of one of the Portland gazpachos below.

Note that this inherently seasonal dish isn’t on most menus for very long, and gazpachos on offer will often vary as ingredients come in and out of peak seasonality. And, as usual, this list is unranked and sorted geographically.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Bethany's Table

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Named not for a restaurant founder, but for the neighborhood in unincorporated Washington county on the outskirts of northwest Portland, Bethany’s Table offers Northwest comfort bistro food emphasizing locally grown produce, meats, and seafood. Gazpacho will typically be a regular soup special once local tomatoes are in season — one recent offering is a watermelon-tomato gazpacho with fresh mint. Bethany’s takes particular care in its Northwest wine list; consider a Willamette Valley Merlot as a pairing.

A bowl of cold gazpacho topped with a sprig of mint leaves.
Watermelon tomato gazpacho at Bethany’s Table.
Bethany’s Table

Seasons & Regions Seafood Grill

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This beloved seafood restaurant in the southwest hills received national attention when its cioppino was featured on Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives. Few things beat a cioppino on a cold rainy Northwest day, but come high summer, a cold tomato gazpacho is a better choice. Seasons and Regions serves a version with heirloom tomatoes from the restaurant’s own farm, topped with garlic croutons. Seasons and Regions is takeout-only as of August 2022, so pickup this gazpacho by the quart.

Caffe Mingo

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Nob Hill’s Caffe Mingo is revered for its pasta, but on a hot day a bowl of starch may not be for everyone. Mingo has diners covered this summer with two refreshing gazpachos: a cucumber gazpacho with orange, fennel, radishes, dill oil, plus a chilled melon gazpacho with jalapeño, micro greens, and fresh Oregon blackberries. Mingo boasts a terrific, largely Italian wine by the glass list — don’t hesitate to ask your server for a pairing recommendation.

A bowl of red gazpacho topped with fresh blackberries and micro greens.
Melon gazpacho at Caffe Mingo.
Caffe Mingo

Higgins

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Downtown’s Higgins has been serving dinners spotlighting local produce to art museum visitors, business travelers, and concert-goers for nearly 30 years. While the farm-to-table model is no longer rare in Portland, the commitment to regional, in-season ingredients never goes out of style. This summer, Higgins is featuring a tomato gazpacho with cucumber, Walla Walla onion, toasted almonds, cilantro, Espelette pepper, and Belper Knolle cheese, making it one of the heartier gazpachos in town — a potential entrée on its own, or supplement to another lighter dish. It has also been used as an accompaniment to dishes like seared albacore.

This Pearl neighborhood favorite typically keeps its menu heavily Italian-American, with classics like chicken piccata, cioppino, and spaghetti carbonara. When summer rolls around however, chef Paolo Parrilli can’t help but reach across the the Mediterranean by adding a Spanish-style gazpacho to the menu. Sip on their melon and fruit-based gazpacho as a pre-dinner cooldown or as a light dessert. This small trattoria can fill up quickly, so grab a reservation for indoor dining. Patio seating is first come, first serve.

Olympia Provisions

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Olympia Provisions may be best known for its world-class sausages and other meats, but don’t overlook the restaurant’s seasonal vegetable offerings, including a grilled little gem lettuce salad, a radicchio and chicory salad, and — when late summer rolls around — a gazpacho highlighting the freshest in-season ingredients. The latest as of this writing is chef Katie Roe’s melon and heirloom tomato gazpacho, topped with calendula flowers and garlic croutons, available at brunch, lunch, and dinner.

A bowl of orange melon and tomato gazpacho topped with calendula flowers and croutons.
Melon and heirloom tomato gazpacho at Olympia Provisions.
Olympia Provisions

Le Pigeon

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The simple peasant origins of gazpacho don’t necessarily demand a fine-dining glow-up, but when the mood strikes for a Michelin-worthy gazpacho, swing by east Burnside’s Le Pigeon in late summer. While the tasting menu changes frequently, and gazpacho can’t be assured, when tomatoes are in season diners are likely to find a treat like a strawberry mezcal gazpacho in the seven-course menu. Le Pigeon is open for dinners only and only by reservation.

Bar Casa Vale

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Since 2016, Bar Casa Vale has been providing inner southeast Portland with a sublime tapas experience in an inviting space. The long, narrow restaurant is dominated by a cerulean-tiled bar on one side and large windows on the other. Chef and owner Nate Tilden (also of Olympia Provisions, Clyde Common, and Spirit of ‘77) takes particular care in marrying the right produce to each dish, and his gazpacho is no exception. Supplanting red onions are even-sweeter torpedo onions, and while “heirloom” might look posher on a menu, he opts for more standard hothouse tomatoes to create the best balance of flavor. Topped with smoked Spanish olive oil, this gazpacho will have diners remembering their appetizer well into the next course.

A clear cup of red gazpacho topped with fresh greens, on top of a black plate next to a small spoon.
Gazpacho at Bar Casa Vale.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Petisco

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Once more narrowly Portuguese-inspired, Petisco today embraces a swath of Mediterranean influences for its frequently updated menus. But as far as it might wander for inspiration, hot clear summer days will always be an ideal time for gazpacho. Petisco prepares a hearty, chunky-style gazpacho topped with cucumber slices and served with hunks of fresh bread, giving diners plenty to bite into. The gazpacho is available as an appetizer or in a full bowl, making it a tempting meal in itself alongside a glass of sangria on a summer evening.

Dame’s Patrick McKee’s gazpacho ups the ante on both sweetness and heat, topping his blended soup with grilled peaches and padrón peppers, infused with rich olive oil and a multidimensional sherry vinegar. Savor an invigorating bowl at Dame’s air-conditioned bar alongside a glass of one of their natural wines, as a light later afternoon treat or as an opening act to McKee’s daily fish offering, carpaccio, or a bowl of vegan pesto pasta. Note that McKee’s menu is offered Thursday through Sunday; on Mondays and Tuesdays Dame hosts the more casual pop-up Companatico.

An bowl of orange-red gazpacho topped with grilled peach and pappers.
Gazpacho at Dame.
Jane Smith / Dame Restaurant

Urdaneta

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The Basque standout Urdaneta on Northeast Alberta offers what is technically a salmorejo, a close cousin of gazpacho with the bread blended into the soup rather than served crouton-style on top, producing a thicker, more easily spoonable consistency. Chef Javier Canteras tops his with a sieved egg, adding a salty dimension and textural contrast. Note this is a relatively small pinxto that even the most generous diner will find hard to share with table-mates — it’s best to order one per person on any given visit.

A rich orange creamy gazpacho topped with sieved egg in a small glass, on top of a wooden board and next to a spoon.
Salmorejo at Urdaneta.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Old Pal

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This new Sunnyside restaurant doesn’t commit to any particular country’s cuisine, hopping between French gougeres and Italian gnocchi with ease. The restaurant represents Spain with its summery gazpacho, a somewhat traditional preparation with heirloom tomatoes and diced diva cucumber for textural contrast. The fun twist: The bowl comes topped with blistered shishitos, letting the gazpacho flip-flop between dip and soup. This restaurant is known to change its menu frequently based on what’s in season, so it’s possible any given visit may involve a new variation on the dish — get it while you can.

Bethany's Table

A bowl of cold gazpacho topped with a sprig of mint leaves.
Watermelon tomato gazpacho at Bethany’s Table.
Bethany’s Table

Named not for a restaurant founder, but for the neighborhood in unincorporated Washington county on the outskirts of northwest Portland, Bethany’s Table offers Northwest comfort bistro food emphasizing locally grown produce, meats, and seafood. Gazpacho will typically be a regular soup special once local tomatoes are in season — one recent offering is a watermelon-tomato gazpacho with fresh mint. Bethany’s takes particular care in its Northwest wine list; consider a Willamette Valley Merlot as a pairing.

A bowl of cold gazpacho topped with a sprig of mint leaves.
Watermelon tomato gazpacho at Bethany’s Table.
Bethany’s Table

Seasons & Regions Seafood Grill

This beloved seafood restaurant in the southwest hills received national attention when its cioppino was featured on Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives. Few things beat a cioppino on a cold rainy Northwest day, but come high summer, a cold tomato gazpacho is a better choice. Seasons and Regions serves a version with heirloom tomatoes from the restaurant’s own farm, topped with garlic croutons. Seasons and Regions is takeout-only as of August 2022, so pickup this gazpacho by the quart.

Caffe Mingo

A bowl of red gazpacho topped with fresh blackberries and micro greens.
Melon gazpacho at Caffe Mingo.
Caffe Mingo

Nob Hill’s Caffe Mingo is revered for its pasta, but on a hot day a bowl of starch may not be for everyone. Mingo has diners covered this summer with two refreshing gazpachos: a cucumber gazpacho with orange, fennel, radishes, dill oil, plus a chilled melon gazpacho with jalapeño, micro greens, and fresh Oregon blackberries. Mingo boasts a terrific, largely Italian wine by the glass list — don’t hesitate to ask your server for a pairing recommendation.

A bowl of red gazpacho topped with fresh blackberries and micro greens.
Melon gazpacho at Caffe Mingo.
Caffe Mingo

Higgins

Downtown’s Higgins has been serving dinners spotlighting local produce to art museum visitors, business travelers, and concert-goers for nearly 30 years. While the farm-to-table model is no longer rare in Portland, the commitment to regional, in-season ingredients never goes out of style. This summer, Higgins is featuring a tomato gazpacho with cucumber, Walla Walla onion, toasted almonds, cilantro, Espelette pepper, and Belper Knolle cheese, making it one of the heartier gazpachos in town — a potential entrée on its own, or supplement to another lighter dish. It has also been used as an accompaniment to dishes like seared albacore.

Allora

This Pearl neighborhood favorite typically keeps its menu heavily Italian-American, with classics like chicken piccata, cioppino, and spaghetti carbonara. When summer rolls around however, chef Paolo Parrilli can’t help but reach across the the Mediterranean by adding a Spanish-style gazpacho to the menu. Sip on their melon and fruit-based gazpacho as a pre-dinner cooldown or as a light dessert. This small trattoria can fill up quickly, so grab a reservation for indoor dining. Patio seating is first come, first serve.

Olympia Provisions

A bowl of orange melon and tomato gazpacho topped with calendula flowers and croutons.
Melon and heirloom tomato gazpacho at Olympia Provisions.
Olympia Provisions

Olympia Provisions may be best known for its world-class sausages and other meats, but don’t overlook the restaurant’s seasonal vegetable offerings, including a grilled little gem lettuce salad, a radicchio and chicory salad, and — when late summer rolls around — a gazpacho highlighting the freshest in-season ingredients. The latest as of this writing is chef Katie Roe’s melon and heirloom tomato gazpacho, topped with calendula flowers and garlic croutons, available at brunch, lunch, and dinner.

A bowl of orange melon and tomato gazpacho topped with calendula flowers and croutons.
Melon and heirloom tomato gazpacho at Olympia Provisions.
Olympia Provisions

Le Pigeon

The simple peasant origins of gazpacho don’t necessarily demand a fine-dining glow-up, but when the mood strikes for a Michelin-worthy gazpacho, swing by east Burnside’s Le Pigeon in late summer. While the tasting menu changes frequently, and gazpacho can’t be assured, when tomatoes are in season diners are likely to find a treat like a strawberry mezcal gazpacho in the seven-course menu. Le Pigeon is open for dinners only and only by reservation.

Bar Casa Vale

A clear cup of red gazpacho topped with fresh greens, on top of a black plate next to a small spoon.
Gazpacho at Bar Casa Vale.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Since 2016, Bar Casa Vale has been providing inner southeast Portland with a sublime tapas experience in an inviting space. The long, narrow restaurant is dominated by a cerulean-tiled bar on one side and large windows on the other. Chef and owner Nate Tilden (also of Olympia Provisions, Clyde Common, and Spirit of ‘77) takes particular care in marrying the right produce to each dish, and his gazpacho is no exception. Supplanting red onions are even-sweeter torpedo onions, and while “heirloom” might look posher on a menu, he opts for more standard hothouse tomatoes to create the best balance of flavor. Topped with smoked Spanish olive oil, this gazpacho will have diners remembering their appetizer well into the next course.

A clear cup of red gazpacho topped with fresh greens, on top of a black plate next to a small spoon.
Gazpacho at Bar Casa Vale.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Petisco

Once more narrowly Portuguese-inspired, Petisco today embraces a swath of Mediterranean influences for its frequently updated menus. But as far as it might wander for inspiration, hot clear summer days will always be an ideal time for gazpacho. Petisco prepares a hearty, chunky-style gazpacho topped with cucumber slices and served with hunks of fresh bread, giving diners plenty to bite into. The gazpacho is available as an appetizer or in a full bowl, making it a tempting meal in itself alongside a glass of sangria on a summer evening.

Dame

An bowl of orange-red gazpacho topped with grilled peach and pappers.
Gazpacho at Dame.
Jane Smith / Dame Restaurant

Dame’s Patrick McKee’s gazpacho ups the ante on both sweetness and heat, topping his blended soup with grilled peaches and padrón peppers, infused with rich olive oil and a multidimensional sherry vinegar. Savor an invigorating bowl at Dame’s air-conditioned bar alongside a glass of one of their natural wines, as a light later afternoon treat or as an opening act to McKee’s daily fish offering, carpaccio, or a bowl of vegan pesto pasta. Note that McKee’s menu is offered Thursday through Sunday; on Mondays and Tuesdays Dame hosts the more casual pop-up Companatico.

An bowl of orange-red gazpacho topped with grilled peach and pappers.
Gazpacho at Dame.
Jane Smith / Dame Restaurant

Urdaneta

A rich orange creamy gazpacho topped with sieved egg in a small glass, on top of a wooden board and next to a spoon.
Salmorejo at Urdaneta.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

The Basque standout Urdaneta on Northeast Alberta offers what is technically a salmorejo, a close cousin of gazpacho with the bread blended into the soup rather than served crouton-style on top, producing a thicker, more easily spoonable consistency. Chef Javier Canteras tops his with a sieved egg, adding a salty dimension and textural contrast. Note this is a relatively small pinxto that even the most generous diner will find hard to share with table-mates — it’s best to order one per person on any given visit.

A rich orange creamy gazpacho topped with sieved egg in a small glass, on top of a wooden board and next to a spoon.
Salmorejo at Urdaneta.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Old Pal

This new Sunnyside restaurant doesn’t commit to any particular country’s cuisine, hopping between French gougeres and Italian gnocchi with ease. The restaurant represents Spain with its summery gazpacho, a somewhat traditional preparation with heirloom tomatoes and diced diva cucumber for textural contrast. The fun twist: The bowl comes topped with blistered shishitos, letting the gazpacho flip-flop between dip and soup. This restaurant is known to change its menu frequently based on what’s in season, so it’s possible any given visit may involve a new variation on the dish — get it while you can.

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