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Clams, grilled quail, sambal, and cheung fun at Gado Gado.
A variety of dishes from Gado Gado’s opening menu.
Molly J. Smith/Eater Portland

14 Standout Spots in Portland’s Eclectic Hollywood District

The stars in Portland’s Hollywood are in the kitchen instead of the silver screen

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A variety of dishes from Gado Gado’s opening menu.
| Molly J. Smith/Eater Portland

The rare Portland neighborhood named after, and anchored by, a single building — the century-old Hollywood Theatre movie palace — the Hollywood district sits at one of the city’s central crossroads. Bisected by Portland’s grid-disrupting, diagonal Sandy Boulevard, the district is home to an I-84 exit, a busy Max station, and a popular farmer’s market that supplies many of the area’s restaurants and home kitchens.

Hollywood’s culinary scene ranges from destination restaurants to quick bites before a flick, and patrons are drawn from all quadrants of the city. Here, some of the city’s finest Korean and Chinese restaurants hold court alongside neighborhood cafes and watering holes, as well as buzzy restaurants attracting tourists. Explore highlights in the map below.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Shaku Bar

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A 2022 addition to the neighborhood, the Shaku Bar is a labor of love from chef Matt Odama and former Trader Joe’s store managers Mark Tucker and Trent Brown. Taking over a former Wasabi Sushi location, the trio have transformed the space into an inviting neighborhood bar, with a food menu pulling inspiration from the Pacific Rim — barbacoa tacos, noodle salads, and pork katsu sandwiches — and a lively cocktail menu. Shaku frequently hosts musical acts on the patio, food pop-ups, fundraisers for causes like Planned Parenthood, and weekly trivia nights on Tuesday. The cool AC makes it a particularly irresistible oasis on scorching summer days.

A semi-opaque green drink with ice, with a slice of lemon and a straw.
Matcha Rush at the Shaku Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Piccone’s Corner

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Taking farm-to-table quite literally, Piccone’s Corner is a butcher shop, deli, and bar specializing in pork directly from owner Austin Piccone’s Wallow & Root Pasture Farm. With beef, lamb, and chicken from other Oregon farms, Piccone’s offers one of the city’s most comprehensive butcher shops, along with a full bar and a kitchen offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner. A breakfast highlight is grain bowl with chorizo, but for lunch try a sandwich featuring their house-cured porchetta. When dinner rolls around, spring for the beef and lamb ragu bolognese. Piccone’s has a handful of salads and other no-meat options, but vegans and vegetarians are advised to look elsewhere.

A plate of sliced pâté.
Pâté at Piccone’s Corner.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

WedgeHead

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In an ultra-wired city, there’s something refreshingly timeless about the low-tech joys of pinball. Even for those who don’t play, the gleaming chrome and neon, and the thumps and pings of flippers and plungers create a more intoxicating atmosphere to the uninitiated than, say, a video arcade or sports bar. WedgeHead may not house the highest volume of machines in town, but with solid food, a creative drink menu, $12 for unlimited play, and an unforced eclectic vibe, many swear by it as the best pinball bar in town. For those seeking a quieter night, the food and cocktail menus are still available to-go.

Close-up of a colorful, shiny, and densely constructed pinball machine, featuring ninja turtles.
Pinball at WedgeHead.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Shandong Restaurant

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Sister restaurant to Northwest Portland’s Kung POW!, Shandong specializes in subtle flavors, generous portions, a focus on seafood, and house-made noodles drawn from the cuisine of the Shandong region of northeastern China. The décor is similarly understated, with seating at the small bar available during peak hours. And, yes, Shandong is open for takeout and dining in on Christmas Day (and every other day besides Thanksgiving).

A diner extracting noodles and vegetables from a noodle bowl with a pair of red chopsticks.
Judy’s noodles at Shandong.
Shandong Restaurant

Gado Gado

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Little sister Oma’s Hideaway may be the recipient of especially splashy praise of late, but this original restaurant from Mariah and Thomas Pisha-Duffly hasn’t faltered as one of Portland’s stellar destination restaurants. Reserve ahead for the restaurant’s rice table service, a 12-plus-course, freewheeling, pseudo-Indonesian feast that could feature delights like shrimp ceviche, coconut tomato curry, and orange cardamom apple cider donuts for dessert. Or dive into the frequently-changing a la carte menu; a recent highlight is the charcoal-grilled albacore in a coconut broth. Note: the potentially life-altering Singapore chili crab is available only on Sunday and Mondays, with a minimum 24-hour preorder requirement.

Grilled albacore in a bowl of coconut broth, topped with shaved turnip and cilantro.
Grilled albacore at Gado Gado.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Fleur De Lis Bakery & Cafe

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Portland is no stranger to Francophile bakeries and cafes, and Fleur De Lis has held down this critical role for Hollywood since 2005. Founded by baker Greg Mistell, the heart of Fleur De Lis is its bread, made with the choicest flours and expertly baked with crisp, chewy crusts. Its breads — including baguettes, Parisiennes, levain, and multi-grain — elevate the cafe’s breakfast and lunch sandwiches. The pastries are excellent as well, with the croissants ranking among Portland’s best. Fleur De Lis’s large patio and dining room — once the Hollywood’s city library — are open for breakfast and lunch Tuesday through Saturday.

An almond-topped croissant and a muffin on a plate next to a paper cup full of black coffee.
Pastries and coffee at Fleur de Lis Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Doe Donuts

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Can a doughnut be truly transportive without butter, milk, or eggs? Vegan Doe Donuts — just around the corner from the Hollywood Theatre — will make converts of even the most skeptical. Oil frying provides plenty of indulgent mouthfeel, and the rotating bounty of creative flavors may include the earl-grey-and-vanilla Portland fog; a rhubarb, rose, and pink peppercorn; and the savory cheeseburger doughnut topped with a house-made pickle. The tiny Doe only offers outdoor picnic table seating and takeout.

A bright pink vegan donut with sprinkles, next to a brown hole-less donut topped with a pickle.
The Doe! and Cheeseburger donuts at Doe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Bitter Rose Coffee Bar

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In a neighborhood full of chain coffee and bustling cafes, the tiny Bitter Rose is a serene gem for neighborhood coffee lovers. Featuring a few tasty food treats from Sparrow and Farina Bakeries, the coffee and tea drinks here are the main draw, prepared by top-notch baristas. Sip beverages hot and cold inside their tasteful modern café or in limited outdoor seating seven days a week.

Floral foam art on top of a green matcha latte in a white cup and saucer.
Matcha latte at Bitter Rose Coffee Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chimcking

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In recent years, Korean fried chicken has exploded from a rare import in Portland restaurants to a familiar component of the city’s culinary ecosystem. In 2021, Hollywood joined the increasing number of neighborhoods with their own Korean fried chicken restaurant to brag about, thanks to an outpost of Beaverton’s Chimking. Whole chickens are available here, but wings are the primary focus, with four flavors: original, soy garlic, hot king, and extra-hot king. All are are available bone-in or boneless. Simple sides to cool the palate include potato wedges, pickled radish, and coleslaw. Dine in the spacious indoor dining room — with a surprisingly deep tap list — or grab a bucket of wings to go.

A basket of double-fried chicken wings.
Hot king wings at Chimking.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chin's Kitchen

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For more than 70 years, Chin’s Kitchen has served Chinese food in the Hollywood District, but when owners Wendy and Cindy Li took over the restaurant in 2017, the restaurant expanded its menu to include a wide range of rarer dishes from the Lis’ childhood in the Dongbei region of China. During Portland’s long rainy season, regulars stop in for steamy containers of sha guo suan cai dun fen tiao, a hearty potato noodle stew with Chinese sauerkraut and savory pork belly, as well as knobby dumplings stuffed with leeks and pork. On hot summer days, it’s all about the restaurant’s la pi, a colorful salad with a core of tangy, translucent noodles. It’s open for takeout.

The neon lights of Chin’s Kitchen.
The exterior of Chin’s Kitchen.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Nectar Cafe

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The homey, funky Nectar Cafe is an enticing diner for vegans, aspiring vegans, and the seitan-curious. Breakfast scrambles and sandwiches are flavorful and make liberal use of different textures. Those seeking sweeter fare won’t be disappointed with the berry compote waffle. Lunchtime sees a host of banh mi, soy curl, and other sandwiches and wraps, with Nectar’s juices and smoothies available all day until 5 p.m. close.

A grilled vegan breakfast sandwich next to a side salad topped with shredded carrot on a white plate.
Breakfast sandwich and salad at Nectar Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Happy Bibimbap House 2

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The Portland sister to the original restaurant in Salem, Happy Bibimbap brings Korean comfort food and soju just steps from the Hollywood’s busy Max station. Encompassing Korean barbecue, sushi, ramen, hot pot, and much more, the food menu can be overwhelming, making it daunting for solo diners but ideal for larger parties with a diversity of tastes. The spacious dining room features a large sake bar, big screen TVs playing the latest K-pop hits, and a baby grand piano for the musically brave. Happy is open Tuesday through Sunday for dining inside, on their small patio, or for takeout.

The Moon and Sixpence

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The Moon, as regulars affectionately dub it, is one of Portland’s few remaining English-style pubs, complete with its name in honor of a century-old Somerset Maugham novel. Warm, polished wood surroundings, heavy polished tap handles, side-by-side dart boards, and a conspicuous absence of TVs make the Moon and Sixpence a pub traditionalist’s dream. The tap list is wide-ranging, with a plurality of American micros. The food menu, for better or worse, is more narrowly English, including fish and chips, Welsh rarebit, cottage pie, and bangers and mash. Grab a pint before a film at the Hollywood or settle in for the night with a ripping mystery novel — the Moon and Sixpence is open daily.

A frosty pint glass of dark stout on a bar, with a bartender in the background.
Nitro stout at The Moon and Sixpence.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

The Bulgogi + Dukuhbee Noodle

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Now that venerable Korean restaurant Du Kuh Bee has departed from Beaverton, Hollywood relative the Bulgogi is the last remaining vestige of the DKB legacy. The restaurant’s hand-pulled noodles are the true draw here, finished in a wok with crunchy cabbage and carrot. However, for those seeking something a little different, the restaurant’s rainbow of a bibimbap is another standout.

A man swings noodle dough within the kitchen at the Bulgogi.
Hand-pulled noodles in the making at the Bulgogi.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

The Shaku Bar

A semi-opaque green drink with ice, with a slice of lemon and a straw.
Matcha Rush at the Shaku Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

A 2022 addition to the neighborhood, the Shaku Bar is a labor of love from chef Matt Odama and former Trader Joe’s store managers Mark Tucker and Trent Brown. Taking over a former Wasabi Sushi location, the trio have transformed the space into an inviting neighborhood bar, with a food menu pulling inspiration from the Pacific Rim — barbacoa tacos, noodle salads, and pork katsu sandwiches — and a lively cocktail menu. Shaku frequently hosts musical acts on the patio, food pop-ups, fundraisers for causes like Planned Parenthood, and weekly trivia nights on Tuesday. The cool AC makes it a particularly irresistible oasis on scorching summer days.

A semi-opaque green drink with ice, with a slice of lemon and a straw.
Matcha Rush at the Shaku Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Piccone’s Corner

A plate of sliced pâté.
Pâté at Piccone’s Corner.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Taking farm-to-table quite literally, Piccone’s Corner is a butcher shop, deli, and bar specializing in pork directly from owner Austin Piccone’s Wallow & Root Pasture Farm. With beef, lamb, and chicken from other Oregon farms, Piccone’s offers one of the city’s most comprehensive butcher shops, along with a full bar and a kitchen offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner. A breakfast highlight is grain bowl with chorizo, but for lunch try a sandwich featuring their house-cured porchetta. When dinner rolls around, spring for the beef and lamb ragu bolognese. Piccone’s has a handful of salads and other no-meat options, but vegans and vegetarians are advised to look elsewhere.

A plate of sliced pâté.
Pâté at Piccone’s Corner.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

WedgeHead

Close-up of a colorful, shiny, and densely constructed pinball machine, featuring ninja turtles.
Pinball at WedgeHead.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

In an ultra-wired city, there’s something refreshingly timeless about the low-tech joys of pinball. Even for those who don’t play, the gleaming chrome and neon, and the thumps and pings of flippers and plungers create a more intoxicating atmosphere to the uninitiated than, say, a video arcade or sports bar. WedgeHead may not house the highest volume of machines in town, but with solid food, a creative drink menu, $12 for unlimited play, and an unforced eclectic vibe, many swear by it as the best pinball bar in town. For those seeking a quieter night, the food and cocktail menus are still available to-go.

Close-up of a colorful, shiny, and densely constructed pinball machine, featuring ninja turtles.
Pinball at WedgeHead.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Shandong Restaurant

A diner extracting noodles and vegetables from a noodle bowl with a pair of red chopsticks.
Judy’s noodles at Shandong.
Shandong Restaurant

Sister restaurant to Northwest Portland’s Kung POW!, Shandong specializes in subtle flavors, generous portions, a focus on seafood, and house-made noodles drawn from the cuisine of the Shandong region of northeastern China. The décor is similarly understated, with seating at the small bar available during peak hours. And, yes, Shandong is open for takeout and dining in on Christmas Day (and every other day besides Thanksgiving).

A diner extracting noodles and vegetables from a noodle bowl with a pair of red chopsticks.
Judy’s noodles at Shandong.
Shandong Restaurant

Gado Gado

Grilled albacore in a bowl of coconut broth, topped with shaved turnip and cilantro.
Grilled albacore at Gado Gado.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Little sister Oma’s Hideaway may be the recipient of especially splashy praise of late, but this original restaurant from Mariah and Thomas Pisha-Duffly hasn’t faltered as one of Portland’s stellar destination restaurants. Reserve ahead for the restaurant’s rice table service, a 12-plus-course, freewheeling, pseudo-Indonesian feast that could feature delights like shrimp ceviche, coconut tomato curry, and orange cardamom apple cider donuts for dessert. Or dive into the frequently-changing a la carte menu; a recent highlight is the charcoal-grilled albacore in a coconut broth. Note: the potentially life-altering Singapore chili crab is available only on Sunday and Mondays, with a minimum 24-hour preorder requirement.

Grilled albacore in a bowl of coconut broth, topped with shaved turnip and cilantro.
Grilled albacore at Gado Gado.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Fleur De Lis Bakery & Cafe

An almond-topped croissant and a muffin on a plate next to a paper cup full of black coffee.
Pastries and coffee at Fleur de Lis Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Portland is no stranger to Francophile bakeries and cafes, and Fleur De Lis has held down this critical role for Hollywood since 2005. Founded by baker Greg Mistell, the heart of Fleur De Lis is its bread, made with the choicest flours and expertly baked with crisp, chewy crusts. Its breads — including baguettes, Parisiennes, levain, and multi-grain — elevate the cafe’s breakfast and lunch sandwiches. The pastries are excellent as well, with the croissants ranking among Portland’s best. Fleur De Lis’s large patio and dining room — once the Hollywood’s city library — are open for breakfast and lunch Tuesday through Saturday.

An almond-topped croissant and a muffin on a plate next to a paper cup full of black coffee.
Pastries and coffee at Fleur de Lis Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Doe Donuts

A bright pink vegan donut with sprinkles, next to a brown hole-less donut topped with a pickle.
The Doe! and Cheeseburger donuts at Doe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Can a doughnut be truly transportive without butter, milk, or eggs? Vegan Doe Donuts — just around the corner from the Hollywood Theatre — will make converts of even the most skeptical. Oil frying provides plenty of indulgent mouthfeel, and the rotating bounty of creative flavors may include the earl-grey-and-vanilla Portland fog; a rhubarb, rose, and pink peppercorn; and the savory cheeseburger doughnut topped with a house-made pickle. The tiny Doe only offers outdoor picnic table seating and takeout.

A bright pink vegan donut with sprinkles, next to a brown hole-less donut topped with a pickle.
The Doe! and Cheeseburger donuts at Doe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Bitter Rose Coffee Bar

Floral foam art on top of a green matcha latte in a white cup and saucer.
Matcha latte at Bitter Rose Coffee Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

In a neighborhood full of chain coffee and bustling cafes, the tiny Bitter Rose is a serene gem for neighborhood coffee lovers. Featuring a few tasty food treats from Sparrow and Farina Bakeries, the coffee and tea drinks here are the main draw, prepared by top-notch baristas. Sip beverages hot and cold inside their tasteful modern café or in limited outdoor seating seven days a week.

Floral foam art on top of a green matcha latte in a white cup and saucer.
Matcha latte at Bitter Rose Coffee Bar.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chimcking

A basket of double-fried chicken wings.
Hot king wings at Chimking.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

In recent years, Korean fried chicken has exploded from a rare import in Portland restaurants to a familiar component of the city’s culinary ecosystem. In 2021, Hollywood joined the increasing number of neighborhoods with their own Korean fried chicken restaurant to brag about, thanks to an outpost of Beaverton’s Chimking. Whole chickens are available here, but wings are the primary focus, with four flavors: original, soy garlic, hot king, and extra-hot king. All are are available bone-in or boneless. Simple sides to cool the palate include potato wedges, pickled radish, and coleslaw. Dine in the spacious indoor dining room — with a surprisingly deep tap list — or grab a bucket of wings to go.

A basket of double-fried chicken wings.
Hot king wings at Chimking.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chin's Kitchen

The neon lights of Chin’s Kitchen.
The exterior of Chin’s Kitchen.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

For more than 70 years, Chin’s Kitchen has served Chinese food in the Hollywood District, but when owners Wendy and Cindy Li took over the restaurant in 2017, the restaurant expanded its menu to include a wide range of rarer dishes from the Lis’ childhood in the Dongbei region of China. During Portland’s long rainy season, regulars stop in for steamy containers of sha guo suan cai dun fen tiao, a hearty potato noodle stew with Chinese sauerkraut and savory pork belly, as well as knobby dumplings stuffed with leeks and pork. On hot summer days, it’s all about the restaurant’s la pi, a colorful salad with a core of tangy, translucent noodles. It’s open for takeout.

The neon lights of Chin’s Kitchen.
The exterior of Chin’s Kitchen.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Nectar Cafe

A grilled vegan breakfast sandwich next to a side salad topped with shredded carrot on a white plate.
Breakfast sandwich and salad at Nectar Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

The homey, funky Nectar Cafe is an enticing diner for vegans, aspiring vegans, and the seitan-curious. Breakfast scrambles and sandwiches are flavorful and make liberal use of different textures. Those seeking sweeter fare won’t be disappointed with the berry compote waffle. Lunchtime sees a host of banh mi, soy curl, and other sandwiches and wraps, with Nectar’s juices and smoothies available all day until 5 p.m. close.

A grilled vegan breakfast sandwich next to a side salad topped with shredded carrot on a white plate.
Breakfast sandwich and salad at Nectar Cafe.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Happy Bibimbap House 2

The Portland sister to the original restaurant in Salem, Happy Bibimbap brings Korean comfort food and soju just steps from the Hollywood’s busy Max station. Encompassing Korean barbecue, sushi, ramen, hot pot, and much more, the food menu can be overwhelming, making it daunting for solo diners but ideal for larger parties with a diversity of tastes. The spacious dining room features a large sake bar, big screen TVs playing the latest K-pop hits, and a baby grand piano for the musically brave. Happy is open Tuesday through Sunday for dining inside, on their small patio, or for takeout.

The Moon and Sixpence

A frosty pint glass of dark stout on a bar, with a bartender in the background.
Nitro stout at The Moon and Sixpence.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

The Moon, as regulars affectionately dub it, is one of Portland’s few remaining English-style pubs, complete with its name in honor of a century-old Somerset Maugham novel. Warm, polished wood surroundings, heavy polished tap handles, side-by-side dart boards, and a conspicuous absence of TVs make the Moon and Sixpence a pub traditionalist’s dream. The tap list is wide-ranging, with a plurality of American micros. The food menu, for better or worse, is more narrowly English, including fish and chips, Welsh rarebit, cottage pie, and bangers and mash. Grab a pint before a film at the Hollywood or settle in for the night with a ripping mystery novel — the Moon and Sixpence is open daily.

A frosty pint glass of dark stout on a bar, with a bartender in the background.
Nitro stout at The Moon and Sixpence.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

The Bulgogi + Dukuhbee Noodle

A man swings noodle dough within the kitchen at the Bulgogi.
Hand-pulled noodles in the making at the Bulgogi.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Now that venerable Korean restaurant Du Kuh Bee has departed from Beaverton, Hollywood relative the Bulgogi is the last remaining vestige of the DKB legacy. The restaurant’s hand-pulled noodles are the true draw here, finished in a wok with crunchy cabbage and carrot. However, for those seeking something a little different, the restaurant’s rainbow of a bibimbap is another standout.

A man swings noodle dough within the kitchen at the Bulgogi.
Hand-pulled noodles in the making at the Bulgogi.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

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