clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Two hot dogs, one topped with yellow mustard and ketchup, the other with sauerkraut and spicy mustard.
Hot dogs from The Dog House PDX.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

17 Places Serving Portland's Finest Hot Dogs

Explore the city’s best franks, brats, dogs, and more

View as Map
Hot dogs from The Dog House PDX.
| Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Is a hot dog a sandwich? The eternal debate rages on, but in Portland, a hot dog can be almost anything it wants to be. From simple yellow mustard to pickled daikon and wasabi, in Rip City the humble snappy hot dog is a vehicle for a universe of flavors. Plus, in a city known for its fancy butcher shops and bespoke charcuterie, many of these dogs and brats use a foundation of Oregon-made — or even house-made — sausages. To keep this list manageable, we’re defining a hot dog as some manner of sausage housed in a bun (no corn dogs here). Explore this unranked, geographically organized map of America’s quintessential summertime food below.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Urban German Wursthaus

Copy Link

While frankfurter may be an increasingly dusty term for the hot dog, it reminds us of the dog’s origin in Germany’s Frankfurt — along with its cousins, the Bavarian bratwurst and Austrian wiener. St. Johns’s Urban German Wursthaus grounds its franks in their Mitteleuropean roots. The interior decor is just on the right side of Bavarian hunting lodge kitsch, but the eye-popping views of the St. Johns Bridge are are a feast for the eyes. Urban German Wursthaus offers a range of German and more local brews, as well as vegan options of some of their favorite dishes. Dine inside or on the spacious patio.

Beez Neez Gourmet Sausages

Copy Link

Beez Neez may not serve actual bees’ knees, but this Slabtown cart does offer grass-fed reindeer (reassure the kiddos Rudolph is safe), adding a dose of subtle gaminess in a lightly toasted bun piled high with caramelized onions and jalapenos. Other options include hot links, Polish sausages, vegan seitan sausage, and a classic beef hot dog. Expert doggers are free to customize their toppings, which include house-made curry ketchup, spicy brown mustard, and both garlic aioli and fried garlic aioli. Optional fries are relatively unexciting, but the sausages are large enough that few will leave hungry.

Wiener Wagon

Copy Link

One of the oldest continually operating food carts in the region, the Wiener Wagon has been a downtown Vancouver institution since 1976 and continues to grill up juicy beef franks for hungry workers on their lunch breaks. On a cold day, opt for a loaded chili dog, or if the weather’s warmer, try the Skip’s favorite, a hot link with mustard, onions, kraut, and tomatoes, named in honor of beloved founder Skip Ballweber, who died in 2020. A lunch only hot dog stand, the Wagon closes at 2 p.m. in the colder months, and 3 p.m. in summer. There is no on-site seating at this small cart.

The Fried Onion

Copy Link

Dirty Harry Callahan might’ve made famous the phrase, “Nobody, and I mean nobody, puts ketchup on a hot dog,” but New Yorkers know it was their rule first. That's why none of the dogs and sausages at this NYC-flavored shop come with ketchup. Hot dogs and other meats sizzle right in front of customers, while cold drinks chill in coolers on the ground in this bare-bones spot. Fried onions are optional, but the surcharge for Red Sox fans is not. Fried onion is lunchtime only, open 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays.

Loyal Legion

Copy Link

One of Portland's most beloved beer halls, Loyal Legion also features an under-sung menu of Olympia Provisions-made sausages, as well as a foot-long frankfurter soaked in a beer bath for two full minutes before grilling. Servers will be happy to offer recommended beer pairings from the bar’s 99-tap list, and both the frank and corndog are available with vegan Field Roast sausage. Loyal Legion is open and serving food until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, until midnight on all other days.

Michael's Italian Beef & Sausage Co.

Copy Link

For Midwest transplants to Bridge City, there will be few discoveries as welcome as Michael’s, located on a triangular block between East Burnside and Sandy. The red hot Chicago dog is appropriately loaded with relish, pickle, onions, peppers, and tomatoes, and the “smothered” chili dog is absolutely drowning in tomato-forward Ohio-style chili. Service may be brusque and the decor utilitarian, but regulars wouldn’t have it any other way. Michael’s is closed Sundays, open until 8 p.m. all other days.

Donnie Vegas

Copy Link

Donnie Vegas is a booze-first charmer on Northeast Alberta, featuring a solid selection of inexpensive, though commensurately-sized drinking dogs, like the Seattle Dog with cream cheese, caramelized onion, and scallion, and a $4 plain dog. Unless you opt for vegan field roast, you'll receive 100 percent Washington Angus beef handled by two Ned Ludd alums and get to eat it in the sweet booths of Donnie's dead-end-desert-diner setting, replete with paintings of Bruce Lee and Muhammad Ali.

Roake's

Copy Link

A roadside hot dog shack with a long-and-storied history extending back to the 1930s — under various names — Roake's grills a timeless, high-value hot dog menu with a 12-inch long Coney Island dog with house special Coney sauce for just $5, a swamped “chiliboat,” and a quick bite short hot dog for under $3. Rub elbows with regulars in the cramped-but-charming vintage interior or snag a picnic-style seat outside under permanent covering. For sausage skeptics, the classic burgers and shakes are equally beloved.

Franks A Lot

Copy Link

Housed in a cute, faux-Bavarian A-frame at the back of the Whole Foods parking lot, just steps from the culinary powerhouse of Northeast 28th Avenue, Franks has been delivering jumbo-sized dogs and hand-made milk shakes to Portlanders for nearly 30 years. Be warned: the 1⁄3 pound German beer frank is not for the faint-hearted, and the chili topping is hearty and loaded with beans. On-site seating is limited to just one covered table, and six uncovered ones, so be prepared to grab and go on rainy days.

Olympia Provisions Public House

Copy Link

Considering how many Portland restaurants, bars, and carts use Olympia Provisions sausages for their hot dogs, it’s smart to go straight to the source for a wide selection of Portland-made franks and brats. Sitting out on picnic tables on a Division Street corner, Olympia Provisions Public House visitors bite into massive frankfurters or bratwurst, topped with dijon and onions or whole-grain mustard and house-made sauerkraut. Cheese-lovers may prefer the kasekrainer, a cheesy sausage with red cabbage kraut and dijon. For full-on Americana, finish a frank and walk over to the nearby Lauretta Jean’s for cherry pie.

Nick's Famous Coney Island

Copy Link

When Nick’s Famous Coney Island opened in 1935, long before cross-continental flights and the interstate highway system, travel between the real Coney Island and Portland would take the better part of a week. While travel times — and prices — have changed a bit, Nick’s Famous continues to serve its classic, nearly 90-year-old Coney dog with bean-less chili sauce and cheese. The leather, steel, and neon decor is pre-retro, and the clientele is heavy on longtime Portlanders. Nick’s Famous features a full bar with happy hour specials for any budget. Hawthorne may have trendier bars, but none as deeply rooted in the soul of Portland.

Otto's Sausage Kitchen

Copy Link

Though primarily a meat market, the quality, speed, and value of Otto’s midday-grilled hot dogs and sausages are enough to draw meat-lovers from all over the city. Otto’s staff will grill each dog to order in front of patrons. The menu is limited to old fashioned frank, pork link, beer-simmered pork link, and chicken sausage, but the quality of the house-made links and tasteful toasting of the buns will leave few wishing for more options. The deli inside does feature veggie options, but no dogs, alas. The grill typically runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the summer, with shorter hours when the rain returns.

A grilled hot dog on a toasted bun with mustard and chopped onions.
Frankfurter at Otto’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Zach's Shack

Copy Link

A few blocks east of storied Nick’s Famous Coney Island, Zach’s cedes the tradition lane to its elder and embraces a spirit of rock `n` roll in its hot dogs. In addition to safe favorites like the New York and Chicago dogs, Zach electrifies its patrons with a black olives and jalapeños Los Lobos dog, a cream cheese and tomato Dylan dog, and the herbacious onion, cucumber, tomato, and celery salt Grateful (Dead) dog. Hot dog options include beef, spicy sausage, Portuguese pork sausage, or vegan field roast. The full bar offers one of Portland’s absolute best happy hours — with unbeatable prices in the 3 p.m. window. Trade concert stories in the funky interior, or hold onto your dog as you play a game of one-handed ping pong on the cozy patio.

Kim Jong Grillin

Copy Link

Those who visit this Southeast Division Korean cart may stick to the tried-and-true “bibim-boxes,” but the KJG Hotdog has developed its own cult following. Here, an Olympia Provisions hot dog lies snug in a baguette as opposed to a softer bun, which supports a pile of sesame sprouts, spicy daikon, kimchi mayo, and pickled mango — a balance of sweetness, saltiness, and funk that’s not unlike the combination of kraut, relish, and mustard.

The Dog House PDX

Copy Link

Tucked in the back corner of Southeast Division’s busy Lot food pod, the Dog House is a perennial favorite, specializing in tender, beer-braised hot dogs with generously loaded, spicy condiments and equally generous and spicy attitude. The wide-ranging menu — including burgers, burritos, and tater tot bowls — is longer than most carts, but nothing is given short shrift, so expect a bit of a wait as your order is prepared. The extensive vegan menu includes field roast versions of their main dogs as well as a handful of vegan specials. The Lot has limited seating for a large number of carts, so on busier days prepare to opt for takeout. The Dog Hose is open until 3 p.m. on Sunday, until 7:30 p.m. the rest of the week.

A grilled hot dog smothered in sauerkraut and spicy mustard.
Kraut dog from the Dog House.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Off The Leash Chicago

Copy Link

East Portland’s birria-to-frankfurter ratio may be high, but the Eastport Food Carts pod on Southeast 82nd features one of Portland’s best dogs. Plus, with 25 carts and tons of outdoor and indoor seating, hot dog lovers can bring friends and family who prefer less meaty fare. Off The Leash Chicago commits faithfully to the Chicago style, for both topping-laden dogs and juicy Italian beef sandwiches. Onion lovers will wade through a mountain of caramelized onions to find the 1⁄3 pound Polish dog underneath — those seeking a wider harmony of flavors need look no further than the 12” Chicago dog, topped with pickle, tomatoes, eye-popping green relish, onions, peppers, and sesame salt. All dogs are customizable with classic or garlic-and-fennel field roast vegan dogs.

A vegan field roast hot dog on a sesame bun topped with caramelized onions and spicy peppers.
Chicago-style vegan dog from Off the Leash.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Mojo Crepes

Copy Link

For whatever reason, hot dog lovers are less unwavering than their pizza brethren, with plenty enjoying New York, Chicago, Seattle, Dodger, and dozens of other styles without hostility. Less well represented in Portland, but no less vital to the hot dog family are dogs pulling flavor cues from the East Asian canon, best represented at Mojo Crepes, just east of 82nd on Southeast Division. The counter service Mojo grills up five different all-beef hot dogs each hitting the palette in exciting ways. The Mojo dog is loaded with fried shallots and nori, while the Seoul dog is a fiesta of kimchi, red onions, and sweet, tangy gochujang. There are no veggie dog options, but all the sweet crepes are either vegan or vegetarian. A back room offers billiards and arcade games, though the main dining area is a bit sparse. Mojo is open until 10 p.m. seven days a week.

Urban German Wursthaus

While frankfurter may be an increasingly dusty term for the hot dog, it reminds us of the dog’s origin in Germany’s Frankfurt — along with its cousins, the Bavarian bratwurst and Austrian wiener. St. Johns’s Urban German Wursthaus grounds its franks in their Mitteleuropean roots. The interior decor is just on the right side of Bavarian hunting lodge kitsch, but the eye-popping views of the St. Johns Bridge are are a feast for the eyes. Urban German Wursthaus offers a range of German and more local brews, as well as vegan options of some of their favorite dishes. Dine inside or on the spacious patio.

Beez Neez Gourmet Sausages

Beez Neez may not serve actual bees’ knees, but this Slabtown cart does offer grass-fed reindeer (reassure the kiddos Rudolph is safe), adding a dose of subtle gaminess in a lightly toasted bun piled high with caramelized onions and jalapenos. Other options include hot links, Polish sausages, vegan seitan sausage, and a classic beef hot dog. Expert doggers are free to customize their toppings, which include house-made curry ketchup, spicy brown mustard, and both garlic aioli and fried garlic aioli. Optional fries are relatively unexciting, but the sausages are large enough that few will leave hungry.

Wiener Wagon

One of the oldest continually operating food carts in the region, the Wiener Wagon has been a downtown Vancouver institution since 1976 and continues to grill up juicy beef franks for hungry workers on their lunch breaks. On a cold day, opt for a loaded chili dog, or if the weather’s warmer, try the Skip’s favorite, a hot link with mustard, onions, kraut, and tomatoes, named in honor of beloved founder Skip Ballweber, who died in 2020. A lunch only hot dog stand, the Wagon closes at 2 p.m. in the colder months, and 3 p.m. in summer. There is no on-site seating at this small cart.

The Fried Onion

Dirty Harry Callahan might’ve made famous the phrase, “Nobody, and I mean nobody, puts ketchup on a hot dog,” but New Yorkers know it was their rule first. That's why none of the dogs and sausages at this NYC-flavored shop come with ketchup. Hot dogs and other meats sizzle right in front of customers, while cold drinks chill in coolers on the ground in this bare-bones spot. Fried onions are optional, but the surcharge for Red Sox fans is not. Fried onion is lunchtime only, open 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays.

Loyal Legion

One of Portland's most beloved beer halls, Loyal Legion also features an under-sung menu of Olympia Provisions-made sausages, as well as a foot-long frankfurter soaked in a beer bath for two full minutes before grilling. Servers will be happy to offer recommended beer pairings from the bar’s 99-tap list, and both the frank and corndog are available with vegan Field Roast sausage. Loyal Legion is open and serving food until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, until midnight on all other days.

Michael's Italian Beef & Sausage Co.

For Midwest transplants to Bridge City, there will be few discoveries as welcome as Michael’s, located on a triangular block between East Burnside and Sandy. The red hot Chicago dog is appropriately loaded with relish, pickle, onions, peppers, and tomatoes, and the “smothered” chili dog is absolutely drowning in tomato-forward Ohio-style chili. Service may be brusque and the decor utilitarian, but regulars wouldn’t have it any other way. Michael’s is closed Sundays, open until 8 p.m. all other days.

Donnie Vegas

Donnie Vegas is a booze-first charmer on Northeast Alberta, featuring a solid selection of inexpensive, though commensurately-sized drinking dogs, like the Seattle Dog with cream cheese, caramelized onion, and scallion, and a $4 plain dog. Unless you opt for vegan field roast, you'll receive 100 percent Washington Angus beef handled by two Ned Ludd alums and get to eat it in the sweet booths of Donnie's dead-end-desert-diner setting, replete with paintings of Bruce Lee and Muhammad Ali.

Roake's

A roadside hot dog shack with a long-and-storied history extending back to the 1930s — under various names — Roake's grills a timeless, high-value hot dog menu with a 12-inch long Coney Island dog with house special Coney sauce for just $5, a swamped “chiliboat,” and a quick bite short hot dog for under $3. Rub elbows with regulars in the cramped-but-charming vintage interior or snag a picnic-style seat outside under permanent covering. For sausage skeptics, the classic burgers and shakes are equally beloved.

Franks A Lot

Housed in a cute, faux-Bavarian A-frame at the back of the Whole Foods parking lot, just steps from the culinary powerhouse of Northeast 28th Avenue, Franks has been delivering jumbo-sized dogs and hand-made milk shakes to Portlanders for nearly 30 years. Be warned: the 1⁄3 pound German beer frank is not for the faint-hearted, and the chili topping is hearty and loaded with beans. On-site seating is limited to just one covered table, and six uncovered ones, so be prepared to grab and go on rainy days.

Olympia Provisions Public House

Considering how many Portland restaurants, bars, and carts use Olympia Provisions sausages for their hot dogs, it’s smart to go straight to the source for a wide selection of Portland-made franks and brats. Sitting out on picnic tables on a Division Street corner, Olympia Provisions Public House visitors bite into massive frankfurters or bratwurst, topped with dijon and onions or whole-grain mustard and house-made sauerkraut. Cheese-lovers may prefer the kasekrainer, a cheesy sausage with red cabbage kraut and dijon. For full-on Americana, finish a frank and walk over to the nearby Lauretta Jean’s for cherry pie.

Nick's Famous Coney Island

When Nick’s Famous Coney Island opened in 1935, long before cross-continental flights and the interstate highway system, travel between the real Coney Island and Portland would take the better part of a week. While travel times — and prices — have changed a bit, Nick’s Famous continues to serve its classic, nearly 90-year-old Coney dog with bean-less chili sauce and cheese. The leather, steel, and neon decor is pre-retro, and the clientele is heavy on longtime Portlanders. Nick’s Famous features a full bar with happy hour specials for any budget. Hawthorne may have trendier bars, but none as deeply rooted in the soul of Portland.

Otto's Sausage Kitchen

A grilled hot dog on a toasted bun with mustard and chopped onions.
Frankfurter at Otto’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Though primarily a meat market, the quality, speed, and value of Otto’s midday-grilled hot dogs and sausages are enough to draw meat-lovers from all over the city. Otto’s staff will grill each dog to order in front of patrons. The menu is limited to old fashioned frank, pork link, beer-simmered pork link, and chicken sausage, but the quality of the house-made links and tasteful toasting of the buns will leave few wishing for more options. The deli inside does feature veggie options, but no dogs, alas. The grill typically runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the summer, with shorter hours when the rain returns.

A grilled hot dog on a toasted bun with mustard and chopped onions.
Frankfurter at Otto’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Zach's Shack

A few blocks east of storied Nick’s Famous Coney Island, Zach’s cedes the tradition lane to its elder and embraces a spirit of rock `n` roll in its hot dogs. In addition to safe favorites like the New York and Chicago dogs, Zach electrifies its patrons with a black olives and jalapeños Los Lobos dog, a cream cheese and tomato Dylan dog, and the herbacious onion, cucumber, tomato, and celery salt Grateful (Dead) dog. Hot dog options include beef, spicy sausage, Portuguese pork sausage, or vegan field roast. The full bar offers one of Portland’s absolute best happy hours — with unbeatable prices in the 3 p.m. window. Trade concert stories in the funky interior, or hold onto your dog as you play a game of one-handed ping pong on the cozy patio.

Kim Jong Grillin

Those who visit this Southeast Division Korean cart may stick to the tried-and-true “bibim-boxes,” but the KJG Hotdog has developed its own cult following. Here, an Olympia Provisions hot dog lies snug in a baguette as opposed to a softer bun, which supports a pile of sesame sprouts, spicy daikon, kimchi mayo, and pickled mango — a balance of sweetness, saltiness, and funk that’s not unlike the combination of kraut, relish, and mustard.

The Dog House PDX

A grilled hot dog smothered in sauerkraut and spicy mustard.
Kraut dog from the Dog House.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Tucked in the back corner of Southeast Division’s busy Lot food pod, the Dog House is a perennial favorite, specializing in tender, beer-braised hot dogs with generously loaded, spicy condiments and equally generous and spicy attitude. The wide-ranging menu — including burgers, burritos, and tater tot bowls — is longer than most carts, but nothing is given short shrift, so expect a bit of a wait as your order is prepared. The extensive vegan menu includes field roast versions of their main dogs as well as a handful of vegan specials. The Lot has limited seating for a large number of carts, so on busier days prepare to opt for takeout. The Dog Hose is open until 3 p.m. on Sunday, until 7:30 p.m. the rest of the week.

A grilled hot dog smothered in sauerkraut and spicy mustard.
Kraut dog from the Dog House.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Related Maps

Off The Leash Chicago

A vegan field roast hot dog on a sesame bun topped with caramelized onions and spicy peppers.
Chicago-style vegan dog from Off the Leash.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

East Portland’s birria-to-frankfurter ratio may be high, but the Eastport Food Carts pod on Southeast 82nd features one of Portland’s best dogs. Plus, with 25 carts and tons of outdoor and indoor seating, hot dog lovers can bring friends and family who prefer less meaty fare. Off The Leash Chicago commits faithfully to the Chicago style, for both topping-laden dogs and juicy Italian beef sandwiches. Onion lovers will wade through a mountain of caramelized onions to find the 1⁄3 pound Polish dog underneath — those seeking a wider harmony of flavors need look no further than the 12” Chicago dog, topped with pickle, tomatoes, eye-popping green relish, onions, peppers, and sesame salt. All dogs are customizable with classic or garlic-and-fennel field roast vegan dogs.

A vegan field roast hot dog on a sesame bun topped with caramelized onions and spicy peppers.
Chicago-style vegan dog from Off the Leash.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Mojo Crepes

For whatever reason, hot dog lovers are less unwavering than their pizza brethren, with plenty enjoying New York, Chicago, Seattle, Dodger, and dozens of other styles without hostility. Less well represented in Portland, but no less vital to the hot dog family are dogs pulling flavor cues from the East Asian canon, best represented at Mojo Crepes, just east of 82nd on Southeast Division. The counter service Mojo grills up five different all-beef hot dogs each hitting the palette in exciting ways. The Mojo dog is loaded with fried shallots and nori, while the Seoul dog is a fiesta of kimchi, red onions, and sweet, tangy gochujang. There are no veggie dog options, but all the sweet crepes are either vegan or vegetarian. A back room offers billiards and arcade games, though the main dining area is a bit sparse. Mojo is open until 10 p.m. seven days a week.

Related Maps