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A cardamom bun sits on a plate at Cafe Olli.
A cardamom bun at Cafe Olli.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

Outstanding Bakeries in Portland and Beyond

A must-hit list of the city's bakeshops, for everything from pies and cakes to croissants and Danishes

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A cardamom bun at Cafe Olli.
| Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

Portland’s pastry scene has always been nationally significant, using locally milled, diverse grain flours for cakes, scones, and breads; even so, many bakeries have continued to innovate, creating a wider spectrum of patisserie and other elaborate pastries available in town. On this map, find the city’s most noteworthy shops for freshly baked pastries like croissants, sweets like cookies, and patisserie. Note that this map focuses exclusively on bakeries with a wide range of offerings, skipping spots that exclusively specialize in bagels, pies, cakes, cookies, and doughnuts — you can find those on their own maps. Also, pastry aficionados can often find stellar breads and baked goods available at farmers market stands like Mio’s Delectables.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Oyatsupan Bakers

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When it first opened in 2016, Oyatsupan brought traditional Japanese baking to the outskirts of Portland. Today, it still serves some of the best Japanese sweet and savory pastries in the area — things like kare pan, a soft bread boat filled with Japanese curry, as well as castella doughnuts and jiggly Japanese cheesecake. Those seeking lightly sweet, fluffy shokupan will also find those here, either in the form of whole loaves or sliced for Japanese-style egg salad sandwiches.

Starter Bread

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Those in the know have adored this bread subscription service for years, specializing in single-varietal grain sourdoughs and porridge breads. Now that Starter has a new home, sharing a building with Gracie’s Apizza in St. Johns, visitors can order pastries and treats directly from the bakers on Sundays. Pastries change often, but they range from cherry buckwheat scones to eggplant-tomato bialys to hazelnut plum galettes, served alongside loaves of bread and apple-brie sandwiches. Sunday service runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Artisserie Fine Bakery

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For those looking to be transported to Paris with elaborate entremets and beautiful laminated pastries, look no further than Artisserie Fine Bakery on Northwest 23rd Street. A gleaming display case shows off an array of macarons, croissants, beignets, and mini entremet mousse cakes; pros head straight for the chocolate Rocher croissant, a croissant filled with crunchy chocolate-pecan filling similar to the candy truffles, or the winter blossom cake made with white chocolate and hazelnut praline. Keep an eye out for seasonal treats like pumpkin pie croissants.

Ken's Artisan Bakery

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Nationally celebrated baker Ken Forkish developed a reputation for the breads at this neighborhood artisan bakery he founded: Loaves are dark and crusty, with an airy crumb and subtle tang from sourdough starters. Although Forkish has since retired, the bakery on Northwest 21st continues to serve exceptional laminated pastries, like its goat-cheese-and-leek croissant or its passionfruit escargot, made with a swirl of croissant dough topped with a vibrant yellow passionfruit glaze. The Oregon croissant, filled with marionberries and hazelnut paste, is a particular stunner.

Nuvrei has always excelled in traditional French baking like caneles, macarons, fruit danishes, and more. But its croissants are the true draw — Nuvrei also offers extraordinary varieties, including distinctive flavors like rose, matcha, and sesame. The Pearl District bakery is cozy but minimalist, with its giant display case giving way to limited seating.

Jen's Pastries

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This Southwest Dakota bakery is perhaps best known for its bolos — the lightly sweet, springy, Portuguese answer to an English muffin — the foundation of breakfast sandwiches at places like Either/Or. But on the weekends, visitors can pop by the bakery for things like French onion soup bialys, passionfruit cruffins, and pumpkin pie turnovers. The shop is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Jinju Patisserie

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For those in the mood for fancier pastries, Jinju Patisserie always delivers. The Williams bakery’s pastry chefs are Las Vegas expats, and this showmanship is evident in desserts like towering fruit tarts, silky mousse layer cakes, and jewelry-like bonbons. That being said, Jinju is also home to one of the city’s finest croissants, one of the largest in town with a shatteringly crisp exterior and a buttery core. Savory pastry fans may prefer the ham, bacon, and cheese croissant, topped with a sprinkle of everything bagel seasoning.

Cafe Olli

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This cozy and bright Northeast Portland restaurant is known primarily for its pizzas and pastas, but some of the finest dishes at this wood-fire-fueled cafe appear in its pastry case. Gorgeous, strawberry blonde Danishes filled with potatoes, bacon, and sour cream bechamel cradle a pile of shaved cheese, while knotted sweet buns hide ribbons of cardamom-scented sugar among their fluffy-sweet folds. Those sticking around for dinner can order other gems off the dessert menu, be it a slice of fudgy chocolate cake or an amaro-spiked tiramisu.

Twisted Croissant

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For years, Twisted Croissant made the most exciting laminated pastries in the Portland area, selling croissants of almost every variation and colorful chouquettes. But what makes this bakery special is its cruffin, a hybrid pastry made by twisting croissant dough into a muffin. Twisted Croissant switches up fillings and flavors for options like raspberry rose cruffins, baklava variations, and more. Twisted Croissant maintains brick-and-mortar locations on Northeast Broadway and Sellwood; the pastries are also available for purchase at various farmers markets on weekends. 

Croissants from Twisted Croissant in a box.
Pastries from Twisted Croissant.
Michelle Lopez / Eater Portland

Pix-O-Matic at Pix Patisserie

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Credit goes to Pix Patisserie for coming up with the most socially distanced, convenient way to abate sugar cravings at any hour of the day. Owner Cheryl Wakerhauser refurbished 20-year-old vending machines, only to fill them with Pix’s macarons, mousses, truffle cakes, and even party favors like sparklers and cocktail mixers. Stand-out pastries include the Amelie, a chocolate mousse entremet with a candied hazelnut center and a crown of orange-flavored creme brulee, as well as the classic opera cake. The Pix-O-Matic is only open for takeaway orders via the vending machine 24 hours every day; customers can also order large-format versions of the desserts for contactless pick-up. 

Little T Baker

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Tucked in a quiet nook away from Southeast Division’s main hustle and bustle, Little T Baker specializes in flaky croissants, seasonal fruit tarts, and chocolate chip cookies studded with giant chunks of molten chocolate. But the main draw of Little T is its crusty baguette, spotted on restaurant menus across town; for another stellar bread, the incredibly soft and pillowy Sally Lunn brioche is one of the city’s finest. Little T Baker goods are also available for purchase at Providore Fine Foods. 

Champagne Poetry Patisserie

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While most of the spots on this list specialize in laminated pastries and homey baked goods, Champagne Poetry is known for maximalist, indulgent desserts like elaborate entremet cakes, lava cheesecakes, and boba-topped cupcakes. The bakery’s cloud bread, tall slices of light and airy bread, arrive layered with flavored cream cheese and milk powder. Enjoy the sweets in their vibrant and photogenic cafe, complete with a 3D floral-adorned wall designed for Instagramming baked goods.

Bakeshop

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Bakeshop is one of the most decorated bakeries in the city: In 2016, Kim Boyce was nominated for the James Beard Award for Outstanding Baker, and won for her cookbook dedicated to whole grain baking in 2011. Everything on the menu is exemplary and the dictionary definition of what the pastry should taste like, but those seeking recommendations should opt for the flaky chocolate croissant made with local Woodblock chocolate or a laminated maple bar so impressively layered that it could almost pass as a Southern biscuit. Walk-in orders are currently available on the weekends, but will soon expand to include Wednesday and Thursday service.

An Xuyên Bakery

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Don’t be fooled by An Xuyên’s nondescript appearance off Southeast Foster Road — its seemingly small size from the outside disguises the fact that you can get almost any kind of baked good inside. Think: crusty French Vietnamese baguettes and banh mi, other Asian breads, Hawaiian doughnuts with black sesame and ube mochi varieties, and all kinds of tarts, cupcakes, cookies, and even custom cakes. The buttery guava cookies are a particular standout. 

Sebastiano's

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Sebastiano’s is a family-owned Sicilian cafe in Montavilla quickly becoming famous for its exceptional muffaletta sandwiches on house-made bread. But even more noteworthy are bakery offerings like candied-orange-and-chocolate cannoli with house-fried cannoli shells, petite boxes of Sicilian cookies, espresso brownies, and olive oil cake. Crowd favorites include the gluten-free pasticcini di mandorle, flourless chewy almond cookies with honey & candied citrus, and the seasonal cassata al forno, a moist and creamy cake filled with sweetened ricotta, chocolate chips, and orange zest. Note: The bakery will soon move to a new Sellwood locale in Spring 2024, and will close its Montavilla locale at the end of the year.

Bella's Italian Bakery

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This small, 24-seat bakery rightfully earns its spot on this list by consistently churning out delicate and meticulous cannoli, light and airy focaccia, and other classic Italian baked goods. It’s no surprise this Lents bakery killed it from the get-go: owner Michelle Vernier honed her craft by working as a pastry chef at Portland classics like Paley’s Place, Imperial, and Wildwood. The bakery is open for walk-up orders of amaretti, anise biscotti, and slabs of tiramisu; customers can also pre-order via an online market.

Oyatsupan Bakers

When it first opened in 2016, Oyatsupan brought traditional Japanese baking to the outskirts of Portland. Today, it still serves some of the best Japanese sweet and savory pastries in the area — things like kare pan, a soft bread boat filled with Japanese curry, as well as castella doughnuts and jiggly Japanese cheesecake. Those seeking lightly sweet, fluffy shokupan will also find those here, either in the form of whole loaves or sliced for Japanese-style egg salad sandwiches.

Starter Bread

Those in the know have adored this bread subscription service for years, specializing in single-varietal grain sourdoughs and porridge breads. Now that Starter has a new home, sharing a building with Gracie’s Apizza in St. Johns, visitors can order pastries and treats directly from the bakers on Sundays. Pastries change often, but they range from cherry buckwheat scones to eggplant-tomato bialys to hazelnut plum galettes, served alongside loaves of bread and apple-brie sandwiches. Sunday service runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Artisserie Fine Bakery

For those looking to be transported to Paris with elaborate entremets and beautiful laminated pastries, look no further than Artisserie Fine Bakery on Northwest 23rd Street. A gleaming display case shows off an array of macarons, croissants, beignets, and mini entremet mousse cakes; pros head straight for the chocolate Rocher croissant, a croissant filled with crunchy chocolate-pecan filling similar to the candy truffles, or the winter blossom cake made with white chocolate and hazelnut praline. Keep an eye out for seasonal treats like pumpkin pie croissants.

Ken's Artisan Bakery

Nationally celebrated baker Ken Forkish developed a reputation for the breads at this neighborhood artisan bakery he founded: Loaves are dark and crusty, with an airy crumb and subtle tang from sourdough starters. Although Forkish has since retired, the bakery on Northwest 21st continues to serve exceptional laminated pastries, like its goat-cheese-and-leek croissant or its passionfruit escargot, made with a swirl of croissant dough topped with a vibrant yellow passionfruit glaze. The Oregon croissant, filled with marionberries and hazelnut paste, is a particular stunner.

Nuvrei

Nuvrei has always excelled in traditional French baking like caneles, macarons, fruit danishes, and more. But its croissants are the true draw — Nuvrei also offers extraordinary varieties, including distinctive flavors like rose, matcha, and sesame. The Pearl District bakery is cozy but minimalist, with its giant display case giving way to limited seating.

Jen's Pastries

This Southwest Dakota bakery is perhaps best known for its bolos — the lightly sweet, springy, Portuguese answer to an English muffin — the foundation of breakfast sandwiches at places like Either/Or. But on the weekends, visitors can pop by the bakery for things like French onion soup bialys, passionfruit cruffins, and pumpkin pie turnovers. The shop is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Jinju Patisserie

For those in the mood for fancier pastries, Jinju Patisserie always delivers. The Williams bakery’s pastry chefs are Las Vegas expats, and this showmanship is evident in desserts like towering fruit tarts, silky mousse layer cakes, and jewelry-like bonbons. That being said, Jinju is also home to one of the city’s finest croissants, one of the largest in town with a shatteringly crisp exterior and a buttery core. Savory pastry fans may prefer the ham, bacon, and cheese croissant, topped with a sprinkle of everything bagel seasoning.

Cafe Olli

This cozy and bright Northeast Portland restaurant is known primarily for its pizzas and pastas, but some of the finest dishes at this wood-fire-fueled cafe appear in its pastry case. Gorgeous, strawberry blonde Danishes filled with potatoes, bacon, and sour cream bechamel cradle a pile of shaved cheese, while knotted sweet buns hide ribbons of cardamom-scented sugar among their fluffy-sweet folds. Those sticking around for dinner can order other gems off the dessert menu, be it a slice of fudgy chocolate cake or an amaro-spiked tiramisu.

Twisted Croissant

For years, Twisted Croissant made the most exciting laminated pastries in the Portland area, selling croissants of almost every variation and colorful chouquettes. But what makes this bakery special is its cruffin, a hybrid pastry made by twisting croissant dough into a muffin. Twisted Croissant switches up fillings and flavors for options like raspberry rose cruffins, baklava variations, and more. Twisted Croissant maintains brick-and-mortar locations on Northeast Broadway and Sellwood; the pastries are also available for purchase at various farmers markets on weekends. 

Croissants from Twisted Croissant in a box.
Pastries from Twisted Croissant.
Michelle Lopez / Eater Portland

Pix-O-Matic at Pix Patisserie

Credit goes to Pix Patisserie for coming up with the most socially distanced, convenient way to abate sugar cravings at any hour of the day. Owner Cheryl Wakerhauser refurbished 20-year-old vending machines, only to fill them with Pix’s macarons, mousses, truffle cakes, and even party favors like sparklers and cocktail mixers. Stand-out pastries include the Amelie, a chocolate mousse entremet with a candied hazelnut center and a crown of orange-flavored creme brulee, as well as the classic opera cake. The Pix-O-Matic is only open for takeaway orders via the vending machine 24 hours every day; customers can also order large-format versions of the desserts for contactless pick-up. 

Little T Baker

Tucked in a quiet nook away from Southeast Division’s main hustle and bustle, Little T Baker specializes in flaky croissants, seasonal fruit tarts, and chocolate chip cookies studded with giant chunks of molten chocolate. But the main draw of Little T is its crusty baguette, spotted on restaurant menus across town; for another stellar bread, the incredibly soft and pillowy Sally Lunn brioche is one of the city’s finest. Little T Baker goods are also available for purchase at Providore Fine Foods. 

Champagne Poetry Patisserie

While most of the spots on this list specialize in laminated pastries and homey baked goods, Champagne Poetry is known for maximalist, indulgent desserts like elaborate entremet cakes, lava cheesecakes, and boba-topped cupcakes. The bakery’s cloud bread, tall slices of light and airy bread, arrive layered with flavored cream cheese and milk powder. Enjoy the sweets in their vibrant and photogenic cafe, complete with a 3D floral-adorned wall designed for Instagramming baked goods.

Bakeshop

Bakeshop is one of the most decorated bakeries in the city: In 2016, Kim Boyce was nominated for the James Beard Award for Outstanding Baker, and won for her cookbook dedicated to whole grain baking in 2011. Everything on the menu is exemplary and the dictionary definition of what the pastry should taste like, but those seeking recommendations should opt for the flaky chocolate croissant made with local Woodblock chocolate or a laminated maple bar so impressively layered that it could almost pass as a Southern biscuit. Walk-in orders are currently available on the weekends, but will soon expand to include Wednesday and Thursday service.

An Xuyên Bakery

Don’t be fooled by An Xuyên’s nondescript appearance off Southeast Foster Road — its seemingly small size from the outside disguises the fact that you can get almost any kind of baked good inside. Think: crusty French Vietnamese baguettes and banh mi, other Asian breads, Hawaiian doughnuts with black sesame and ube mochi varieties, and all kinds of tarts, cupcakes, cookies, and even custom cakes. The buttery guava cookies are a particular standout. 

Sebastiano's

Sebastiano’s is a family-owned Sicilian cafe in Montavilla quickly becoming famous for its exceptional muffaletta sandwiches on house-made bread. But even more noteworthy are bakery offerings like candied-orange-and-chocolate cannoli with house-fried cannoli shells, petite boxes of Sicilian cookies, espresso brownies, and olive oil cake. Crowd favorites include the gluten-free pasticcini di mandorle, flourless chewy almond cookies with honey & candied citrus, and the seasonal cassata al forno, a moist and creamy cake filled with sweetened ricotta, chocolate chips, and orange zest. Note: The bakery will soon move to a new Sellwood locale in Spring 2024, and will close its Montavilla locale at the end of the year.

Related Maps

Bella's Italian Bakery

This small, 24-seat bakery rightfully earns its spot on this list by consistently churning out delicate and meticulous cannoli, light and airy focaccia, and other classic Italian baked goods. It’s no surprise this Lents bakery killed it from the get-go: owner Michelle Vernier honed her craft by working as a pastry chef at Portland classics like Paley’s Place, Imperial, and Wildwood. The bakery is open for walk-up orders of amaretti, anise biscotti, and slabs of tiramisu; customers can also pre-order via an online market.

Related Maps