clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Bend, Oregon at night.
The Bend skyline, with Mount Jefferson in the background.
Riley Smith Photography/Shutterstock

Jaw-Dropping Restaurants in Bend, Oregon

Find the most enticing restaurants in this Central Oregon vacation destination, from taco joints to fine dining

View as Map
The Bend skyline, with Mount Jefferson in the background.
| Riley Smith Photography/Shutterstock

Bend has long been known as a place for outdoor adventure and lots of sunshine, but its status as a food and drink city is also emerging. In recent years, chefs, restaurateurs, and critics have been taking notice of Bend’s exciting growth in the restaurant world. The meat-and-potatoes moniker is fading with the introduction of restaurants serving A5 wagyu steaks, Argentinian-style bratwursts, and unforgettable northern Thai delights. Below, find a list of killer spots to hit between hikes, ski trips, or days on the river. This map of Bend's finest breweries may be a better fit for those seeking a brew in one of the country’s best beer towns.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

The Sparrow Bakery Northwest

Copy Link

While the Sparrow bakery has opened in Portland, the Northwest Crossing location is now the only one in Bend. Visitors get messy fingers when arugula oil drips from the breakfast sandwich stacked on a flaky Sparrow croissant. Other savory sandwiches on Sparrow breads include the croque monsieur on brioche and lox-topped bagels, but the stars here are the pastries. Don’t miss the famous ocean roll, a flaky laminated pastry layered with cardamom vanilla sugar that is best eaten fresh at the bakery.

Pastries, sandwiches and coffee from Sparrow Bakery.
Sparrow Bakery breakfast.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Trattoria Sbandati

Copy Link

In an unassuming strip mall behind a gas station, this elegant Italian restaurant will transport you to chef Juri Sbandati’s home in Tuscany. Photos of bicycles and the Florence city crest add to the feeling of an Italian getaway, where the tagliatelle and pappardelle are hand-made and topped with traditional Bolognese or Chiantigiana, a Chianti-based sauce with Italian sausage and fennel. Steak, pork, and pan-seared fish make up the secondi, along with giant polpette meatballs made from the Sbandati family recipe. 

White table cloth table near window in Italian restaurant.
Housemade spaghetti on table at Trattoria Sbandati.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Situated in a quaint little cottage on busy Galveston Avenue, Ariana has been the cornerstone of fine dining in Bend for 18-plus years. Husband-wife duo Andrès and Ariana Fernandez have continually created simple, refined food, often incorporating seasonal produce from Central Oregon. Servers bring creative dishes with the utmost professionalism for an experience worthy of any special occasion. Seating is limited and reservations can be hard to get, so call early to ensure you’ll get a taste of the seared scallops with Dungeness crab risotto. 

Bangers & Brews

Copy Link

The Garcia family, natives of Argentina, serve a variety of bratwursts — think alligator, lamb, elk, wild boar, and even Alaskan reindeer — at two locations in Bend, with extensive tap lists and sausage toppings. Grandma Mercedes Garcia makes the restaurants’ chimichurri in-house, offered as a side with bread and sold by the jar. Finish the meal with creamy house-made cheesecake. The restaurant is open for indoor and outdoor dining, delivery, and takeout.

Chow’s customers and their dogs mill around out front near the giant fork that holds the restaurant’s metal scrap sign. Indoors, the earthy cottage pop-culture-inspired paintings hang in stark juxtaposition. Chef and owner David Touvel grows ingredients for the menu in the restaurant’s garden. Homemade bread accompanies dishes like poached eggs and thick-cut bacon, piled on steamed spinach and a cornmeal-crusted tomato. Cheesy bacon cheddar grits are a must-order side. For lunch, pick from honey-truffle-fried chicken sandwiches, smash burgers, Chow mac and cheese, or salads that are even better when just picked. 

Breakfast plate and fruit bowl in Chow with fire in background.
Blackstone breakfast at Chow.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Bosa Food & Drink

Copy Link

This lively osteria on Galveston is upscale but casual, modeled after the feel of Ava Gene’s in Portland. The menu features European wine-friendly food with pasta dishes originating in northern Italy. Like all Bosa’s pasta, the tagliatelle is made fresh daily and served with ground pork and beef ragu, complemented by a spectrum of herbs. It goes perfectly with a glass of Chianti and amazing light focaccia with whipped butter, parsley, and chives. 

Bolognese pasta anf focaccia bread on bar.
Bosa bolognese on bar,
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Miyagi Ramen

Copy Link

Named for the Karate Kid master, this Industrial Way restaurant is as stylish as it is exceptional. Local artist Richard Yozamp provided the expansive art piece that gives the small restaurant a hip feel, and a garage-door window wall rises to open up the space on nice days. Miyagi offers a choice of three ramen, including a smoked shiitake-cashew-based soup; pea shoots, spicy tofu, pickled shiitake, and more create a mesh of umami, salty, sour, and sweet. Meat eaters can add a soft egg and chashu pork belly for protein and richness. Those that aren’t up for soup can choose from yakitori skewers, rice bowls, and fat, stuffed steam buns.

Ramen bowl on table in front of colorful Yozamp mural.
Ramen bowl from Miyagi Ramen.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

The Lemon Tree

Copy Link

Lemon Tree is a bright little breakfast and lunch spot at the edge of downtown Bend, where you’ll find a bustling group of diners eating inside and outdoors. Chefs and owners Jaclyn Perez and Betsy McDonald met working on mega-yachts cruising around the world, where they honed the subtleties of the global cuisine you’ll find here. Breakfast includes subtly spiced dishes like Tunisian shakshuka and Indonesian fried rice dish nasi goreng. The cafe’s coronation salad may be the best salad in Bend. Choose a foamy latte with a pastry baked fresh daily or one of the restaurant’s refreshing cocktails.

Bright breakfast table with fritata, pastry and drinks.
World cuisine breakfast at Lemon Tree.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

On the corner of Franklin and Wall Street, the wood-paneled, leather-boothed Drake has become an established place for full-time residents to meet and eat in Bend. Drake has recently hired a new executive chef, and while some favorites have disappeared, much of the menu remains. It’s a welcoming place to order duck confit with celery root puree and a seasonal hash, or one of the daily creative specials to refuel after a day of mountain biking or skiing.

Duck confit and chanterelle mushrooms at Drake restaurant.
Duck confit at Drake.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

Copy Link

Greeted by a “river” flowing through its glass bank overhead, 5 Fusion has long had one of the most creative menus in Bend. Following the departure of its chef and co-owner, executive chef Sascha Lyon has stepped in, coming from some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles and New York (we’re talking Daniel and Balthazar). Additionally, a new beverage director and sushi chef will establish the new menu. Early tastings of the miso-glazed asparagus and seared sea scallops prove it will be outstanding. The blue fin tuna tataki with Puna Gardens hearts of palm, watermelon radish, heirloom tomatoes, endive, and cilantro vinaigrette is fresh on the palate, an example of the care taken with each ingredient.

Asparagus in dish with sauce and salmon roe.
Asparagus with salmon roe.
Barb Gonzale/ Eater Portland

Barrio/Shimshon

Copy Link

When chef Steven Draheim reopened the lively, colorful downtown Barrio location, he added Shimshon items from his Israeli food cart. After spending some time with his wife Amy’s family in Israel, the couple was inspired to offer family-style Israeli food alongside small plates of Spanish patatas bravas and Puerto Rican jibaritos. Shimshon’s meze section includes things like falafel, hummus, and za’atar fries. But the magic happens when the two sides of the restaurant combine — think: chicken shawarma tacos or the med paella, which adds lamb merguez and chicken shawarma to the masterfully balanced saffron and smoky sofrito rice.

Israeli hummus, Latin American paella at Barrio.
Shimshon and Barrio dishes.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Bos Taurus

Copy Link

While Bos Taurus is elegant dining at its best, diners dress in everything from Uggs to cocktail attire when they visit the modern industrial-designed restaurant. Here, visitors can pick from fresh and dry-aged steaks from the best ranches in the country — think: Cedar River Farms rib-eyes and Allen Brothers porterhouses — with notes on location, cut, and breed. The piece de resistance is the Wagyu Japanese Miyazaki A5 New York strip loin or Kyoto A5 tenderloin, gorgeously marbled and truly melt-in-your-mouth tender. Bos Taurus is not only particular about its meat, it’s particular about how you cut it, coming to the table with a box of knives so diners can choose a light one made with Samurai blades or heavy burlwood with blue steel. Meals should start with chef and owner George Morris’s beautiful cured hamachi with spicy ponzu gel and an order of crispy duck confit; finish with the lusciously creamy decadence of butterscotch pudding budino with foie gras. 

Tweezers grip A5 Wagyu steak slice.
A5 Wagyu streak at Bos Taurus.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Sen Thai Noodles & Hot Pot

Copy Link

From the team behind blockbuster Thai restaurant Wild Rose, Sen plays with the concept of Thai hot pot, using two soup bases — a Thai version of sukiyaki or a yellow curry — and a choice of vegetables and meats, like thinly sliced beef and prawns. Each hot pot serves two to three guests, and must be reserved in advance. Sen also has a wide selection of other Thai noodle soups and dishes, like sweet-and-sour yen ta fo with prawns and calamari or the classic chicken-and-rice dish khao man gai. Sen is open for takeout and onsite dining including a warm-weather outside patio overlooking Mirror Pond.

Hand with tweezers drops meat into a Thai hot pot.
Cooking Thai hot pot.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater/Portland

900 Wall

Copy Link

Inside this historic, two-story brick building in the center of downtown, 900 Wall is a favorite with longtime locals. Executive chef Cliff Eslinger uses locally sourced, responsibly grown ingredients to prepare things like duck cassoulet and Vaquero Valley Ranch & Apricot Farms meatballs, as well as house charcuterie like chicken liver pate and mortadella. The daily happy hour from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. offers wild shrimp or oysters on the half shell, as well as fried green beans. Those in the know won’t miss the fluffy beignets with dipping sauce for dessert. 

Green beans and beignets on the bar at 900 wall.
At the bar at 900 Wall.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Blissful Spoon

Copy Link

Aptly named, the gluten-free cakes and pastries are blissful at this Newport Avenue restaurant open for breakfast and lunch. Owner Kamal Bekkari is from Morocco and owns the restaurant with wife, Miki, serving both nutty-sweet almond friands and Moroccan shakshuka with baked eggs and harissa-forward red peppers and tomatoes. Other standouts are the sweet-and-savory bacon and egg tartlet, and the delicate jambon au beurre. Eat in or grab some pastries and homemade granola to go.

Eggs on chakchouka tomato and peppers with bread.
Chakchouka at Blissful Spoon.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Zydeco Kitchen & Cocktails

Copy Link

Inside Zydeco’s elegant and bustling space lies one of Bend’s most consistent and popular restaurants. For more than 18 years, the restaurant has served Northwestern food with a Louisiana flair. Along with enticing options like jambalaya and blackened redfish, visitors will find dishes like vegetable risotto and a delicate beet salad with goat cheese and pistachios. The upscale bar is a great place to try one of its creative cocktails, best accompanied by barbecue shrimp and grits — get extra bread, as that sauce is worth wiping the plate clean. For dessert, the Zydeco carrot cake is the best in town. Zydeco also offers a full gluten-free menu.

Fish atop spinach, cioppino, and shrimp at grits.
Blackened fish and other Southern specialties at Zydeco.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Wild Rose Northern Thai Eats

Copy Link

This family-run Northern Thai downtown gem exudes a quirky, energetic atmosphere well-paired with vibrant, spicy food. Servers bring Grandfather’s tom kha soup, laden with creamy coconut and lemongrass, accompanied by a Sterno and ladle to serve the table. Delightful turmeric clams come with sticky rice meant to be eaten with the hands. Or, visitors can choose a nutty, flavorful brown rice to go with kabocha squash curry. Dishes can be shared or ordered individually. The wait here can be long for dinner, so reservations are recommended — and so is a peek at the rotating specials board. Customers can order takeout, make a reservation for indoor dinner seating, or walk in for lunch.

Tom kha soup and other thai dishes.
Grandfather’s Tom Kha soup at Wild Rose.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

El Sancho Taco Shop

Copy Link

What was once a popular food truck is now one of Bend’s most happening local hangouts, with a second location on the Westside. Both have timely counter service, vintage booths, and year-round outdoor seating. The walls are adorned with funky, colorful paintings, and the menu is filled with dishes like carnitas tacos, grilled mahi-mahi gorditas, and inventive margaritas. Beyond rice and beans, side orders include fried plantains, candied yams, and sauteed veggies. The tacos here are the main draw, but the crackling chicharrones and tantalizing specials board are no slouch either.

Tacos on a plate in a colorful room.
El Sancho tacos.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Rockin' Dave's Bistro & Backstage Lounge

Copy Link

Located on Greenwood around midtown Bend, Rockin’ Dave Flier smiles in front of a green record album on the restaurant’s sign. His playful passion for music is obvious in his service, as well, asking customers the name of their favorite band or artist to identify their order placed at the counter. Flier makes the best bagels in town, which diners order as a breakfast sandwich or to take home. Smoked pork belly breakfast burritos can come wrapped in spinach tortillas, and Flier smokes Northwest beef for his pastrami and corned beef; the restaurant’s bread is also baked in-house, including the rye used in Rockin’ Dave’s knockout Reuben.

Reuben sandwich on a plate in front of colorful walls.
Reuben at Rockin’ Daves.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Hablo Tacos

Copy Link

George Morris studied Mexican street food in Tijuana to develop the recipes at this eastside taqueria, decorated in the style of those found just south of the border. Pork is cooked on a trompo, where it self-bastes in pineapple juice for moist and tasty tacos al pastor. Along with the typical folded tacos, Hablo offers vampiros that melt cheese between crunchy tortillas piled with meat, cabbage, habanero crema, and pico de gallo. Order a beer, margarita, or one of the Mexican soft drinks that line the front wall as you enter.

Avacados filled with guacamole with chips and margarita in background.
Guacamole and chips at Hablo Tacos.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

The Sparrow Bakery Northwest

While the Sparrow bakery has opened in Portland, the Northwest Crossing location is now the only one in Bend. Visitors get messy fingers when arugula oil drips from the breakfast sandwich stacked on a flaky Sparrow croissant. Other savory sandwiches on Sparrow breads include the croque monsieur on brioche and lox-topped bagels, but the stars here are the pastries. Don’t miss the famous ocean roll, a flaky laminated pastry layered with cardamom vanilla sugar that is best eaten fresh at the bakery.

Pastries, sandwiches and coffee from Sparrow Bakery.
Sparrow Bakery breakfast.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Trattoria Sbandati

In an unassuming strip mall behind a gas station, this elegant Italian restaurant will transport you to chef Juri Sbandati’s home in Tuscany. Photos of bicycles and the Florence city crest add to the feeling of an Italian getaway, where the tagliatelle and pappardelle are hand-made and topped with traditional Bolognese or Chiantigiana, a Chianti-based sauce with Italian sausage and fennel. Steak, pork, and pan-seared fish make up the secondi, along with giant polpette meatballs made from the Sbandati family recipe. 

White table cloth table near window in Italian restaurant.
Housemade spaghetti on table at Trattoria Sbandati.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Ariana

Situated in a quaint little cottage on busy Galveston Avenue, Ariana has been the cornerstone of fine dining in Bend for 18-plus years. Husband-wife duo Andrès and Ariana Fernandez have continually created simple, refined food, often incorporating seasonal produce from Central Oregon. Servers bring creative dishes with the utmost professionalism for an experience worthy of any special occasion. Seating is limited and reservations can be hard to get, so call early to ensure you’ll get a taste of the seared scallops with Dungeness crab risotto. 

Bangers & Brews

The Garcia family, natives of Argentina, serve a variety of bratwursts — think alligator, lamb, elk, wild boar, and even Alaskan reindeer — at two locations in Bend, with extensive tap lists and sausage toppings. Grandma Mercedes Garcia makes the restaurants’ chimichurri in-house, offered as a side with bread and sold by the jar. Finish the meal with creamy house-made cheesecake. The restaurant is open for indoor and outdoor dining, delivery, and takeout.

Chow

Chow’s customers and their dogs mill around out front near the giant fork that holds the restaurant’s metal scrap sign. Indoors, the earthy cottage pop-culture-inspired paintings hang in stark juxtaposition. Chef and owner David Touvel grows ingredients for the menu in the restaurant’s garden. Homemade bread accompanies dishes like poached eggs and thick-cut bacon, piled on steamed spinach and a cornmeal-crusted tomato. Cheesy bacon cheddar grits are a must-order side. For lunch, pick from honey-truffle-fried chicken sandwiches, smash burgers, Chow mac and cheese, or salads that are even better when just picked. 

Breakfast plate and fruit bowl in Chow with fire in background.
Blackstone breakfast at Chow.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Bosa Food & Drink

This lively osteria on Galveston is upscale but casual, modeled after the feel of Ava Gene’s in Portland. The menu features European wine-friendly food with pasta dishes originating in northern Italy. Like all Bosa’s pasta, the tagliatelle is made fresh daily and served with ground pork and beef ragu, complemented by a spectrum of herbs. It goes perfectly with a glass of Chianti and amazing light focaccia with whipped butter, parsley, and chives. 

Bolognese pasta anf focaccia bread on bar.
Bosa bolognese on bar,
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Miyagi Ramen

Named for the Karate Kid master, this Industrial Way restaurant is as stylish as it is exceptional. Local artist Richard Yozamp provided the expansive art piece that gives the small restaurant a hip feel, and a garage-door window wall rises to open up the space on nice days. Miyagi offers a choice of three ramen, including a smoked shiitake-cashew-based soup; pea shoots, spicy tofu, pickled shiitake, and more create a mesh of umami, salty, sour, and sweet. Meat eaters can add a soft egg and chashu pork belly for protein and richness. Those that aren’t up for soup can choose from yakitori skewers, rice bowls, and fat, stuffed steam buns.

Ramen bowl on table in front of colorful Yozamp mural.
Ramen bowl from Miyagi Ramen.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

The Lemon Tree

Lemon Tree is a bright little breakfast and lunch spot at the edge of downtown Bend, where you’ll find a bustling group of diners eating inside and outdoors. Chefs and owners Jaclyn Perez and Betsy McDonald met working on mega-yachts cruising around the world, where they honed the subtleties of the global cuisine you’ll find here. Breakfast includes subtly spiced dishes like Tunisian shakshuka and Indonesian fried rice dish nasi goreng. The cafe’s coronation salad may be the best salad in Bend. Choose a foamy latte with a pastry baked fresh daily or one of the restaurant’s refreshing cocktails.

Bright breakfast table with fritata, pastry and drinks.
World cuisine breakfast at Lemon Tree.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Drake

On the corner of Franklin and Wall Street, the wood-paneled, leather-boothed Drake has become an established place for full-time residents to meet and eat in Bend. Drake has recently hired a new executive chef, and while some favorites have disappeared, much of the menu remains. It’s a welcoming place to order duck confit with celery root puree and a seasonal hash, or one of the daily creative specials to refuel after a day of mountain biking or skiing.

Duck confit and chanterelle mushrooms at Drake restaurant.
Duck confit at Drake.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

Greeted by a “river” flowing through its glass bank overhead, 5 Fusion has long had one of the most creative menus in Bend. Following the departure of its chef and co-owner, executive chef Sascha Lyon has stepped in, coming from some of the best restaurants in Los Angeles and New York (we’re talking Daniel and Balthazar). Additionally, a new beverage director and sushi chef will establish the new menu. Early tastings of the miso-glazed asparagus and seared sea scallops prove it will be outstanding. The blue fin tuna tataki with Puna Gardens hearts of palm, watermelon radish, heirloom tomatoes, endive, and cilantro vinaigrette is fresh on the palate, an example of the care taken with each ingredient.

Asparagus in dish with sauce and salmon roe.
Asparagus with salmon roe.
Barb Gonzale/ Eater Portland

Barrio/Shimshon

When chef Steven Draheim reopened the lively, colorful downtown Barrio location, he added Shimshon items from his Israeli food cart. After spending some time with his wife Amy’s family in Israel, the couple was inspired to offer family-style Israeli food alongside small plates of Spanish patatas bravas and Puerto Rican jibaritos. Shimshon’s meze section includes things like falafel, hummus, and za’atar fries. But the magic happens when the two sides of the restaurant combine — think: chicken shawarma tacos or the med paella, which adds lamb merguez and chicken shawarma to the masterfully balanced saffron and smoky sofrito rice.

Israeli hummus, Latin American paella at Barrio.
Shimshon and Barrio dishes.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Bos Taurus

While Bos Taurus is elegant dining at its best, diners dress in everything from Uggs to cocktail attire when they visit the modern industrial-designed restaurant. Here, visitors can pick from fresh and dry-aged steaks from the best ranches in the country — think: Cedar River Farms rib-eyes and Allen Brothers porterhouses — with notes on location, cut, and breed. The piece de resistance is the Wagyu Japanese Miyazaki A5 New York strip loin or Kyoto A5 tenderloin, gorgeously marbled and truly melt-in-your-mouth tender. Bos Taurus is not only particular about its meat, it’s particular about how you cut it, coming to the table with a box of knives so diners can choose a light one made with Samurai blades or heavy burlwood with blue steel. Meals should start with chef and owner George Morris’s beautiful cured hamachi with spicy ponzu gel and an order of crispy duck confit; finish with the lusciously creamy decadence of butterscotch pudding budino with foie gras. 

Tweezers grip A5 Wagyu steak slice.
A5 Wagyu streak at Bos Taurus.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Sen Thai Noodles & Hot Pot

From the team behind blockbuster Thai restaurant Wild Rose, Sen plays with the concept of Thai hot pot, using two soup bases — a Thai version of sukiyaki or a yellow curry — and a choice of vegetables and meats, like thinly sliced beef and prawns. Each hot pot serves two to three guests, and must be reserved in advance. Sen also has a wide selection of other Thai noodle soups and dishes, like sweet-and-sour yen ta fo with prawns and calamari or the classic chicken-and-rice dish khao man gai. Sen is open for takeout and onsite dining including a warm-weather outside patio overlooking Mirror Pond.

Hand with tweezers drops meat into a Thai hot pot.
Cooking Thai hot pot.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater/Portland

900 Wall

Inside this historic, two-story brick building in the center of downtown, 900 Wall is a favorite with longtime locals. Executive chef Cliff Eslinger uses locally sourced, responsibly grown ingredients to prepare things like duck cassoulet and Vaquero Valley Ranch & Apricot Farms meatballs, as well as house charcuterie like chicken liver pate and mortadella. The daily happy hour from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. offers wild shrimp or oysters on the half shell, as well as fried green beans. Those in the know won’t miss the fluffy beignets with dipping sauce for dessert. 

Green beans and beignets on the bar at 900 wall.
At the bar at 900 Wall.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Blissful Spoon

Aptly named, the gluten-free cakes and pastries are blissful at this Newport Avenue restaurant open for breakfast and lunch. Owner Kamal Bekkari is from Morocco and owns the restaurant with wife, Miki, serving both nutty-sweet almond friands and Moroccan shakshuka with baked eggs and harissa-forward red peppers and tomatoes. Other standouts are the sweet-and-savory bacon and egg tartlet, and the delicate jambon au beurre. Eat in or grab some pastries and homemade granola to go.

Eggs on chakchouka tomato and peppers with bread.
Chakchouka at Blissful Spoon.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Related Maps

Zydeco Kitchen & Cocktails

Inside Zydeco’s elegant and bustling space lies one of Bend’s most consistent and popular restaurants. For more than 18 years, the restaurant has served Northwestern food with a Louisiana flair. Along with enticing options like jambalaya and blackened redfish, visitors will find dishes like vegetable risotto and a delicate beet salad with goat cheese and pistachios. The upscale bar is a great place to try one of its creative cocktails, best accompanied by barbecue shrimp and grits — get extra bread, as that sauce is worth wiping the plate clean. For dessert, the Zydeco carrot cake is the best in town. Zydeco also offers a full gluten-free menu.

Fish atop spinach, cioppino, and shrimp at grits.
Blackened fish and other Southern specialties at Zydeco.
Barb Gonzalez/ Eater Portland

Wild Rose Northern Thai Eats

This family-run Northern Thai downtown gem exudes a quirky, energetic atmosphere well-paired with vibrant, spicy food. Servers bring Grandfather’s tom kha soup, laden with creamy coconut and lemongrass, accompanied by a Sterno and ladle to serve the table. Delightful turmeric clams come with sticky rice meant to be eaten with the hands. Or, visitors can choose a nutty, flavorful brown rice to go with kabocha squash curry. Dishes can be shared or ordered individually. The wait here can be long for dinner, so reservations are recommended — and so is a peek at the rotating specials board. Customers can order takeout, make a reservation for indoor dinner seating, or walk in for lunch.

Tom kha soup and other thai dishes.
Grandfather’s Tom Kha soup at Wild Rose.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

El Sancho Taco Shop

What was once a popular food truck is now one of Bend’s most happening local hangouts, with a second location on the Westside. Both have timely counter service, vintage booths, and year-round outdoor seating. The walls are adorned with funky, colorful paintings, and the menu is filled with dishes like carnitas tacos, grilled mahi-mahi gorditas, and inventive margaritas. Beyond rice and beans, side orders include fried plantains, candied yams, and sauteed veggies. The tacos here are the main draw, but the crackling chicharrones and tantalizing specials board are no slouch either.

Tacos on a plate in a colorful room.
El Sancho tacos.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Rockin' Dave's Bistro & Backstage Lounge

Located on Greenwood around midtown Bend, Rockin’ Dave Flier smiles in front of a green record album on the restaurant’s sign. His playful passion for music is obvious in his service, as well, asking customers the name of their favorite band or artist to identify their order placed at the counter. Flier makes the best bagels in town, which diners order as a breakfast sandwich or to take home. Smoked pork belly breakfast burritos can come wrapped in spinach tortillas, and Flier smokes Northwest beef for his pastrami and corned beef; the restaurant’s bread is also baked in-house, including the rye used in Rockin’ Dave’s knockout Reuben.

Reuben sandwich on a plate in front of colorful walls.
Reuben at Rockin’ Daves.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Hablo Tacos

George Morris studied Mexican street food in Tijuana to develop the recipes at this eastside taqueria, decorated in the style of those found just south of the border. Pork is cooked on a trompo, where it self-bastes in pineapple juice for moist and tasty tacos al pastor. Along with the typical folded tacos, Hablo offers vampiros that melt cheese between crunchy tortillas piled with meat, cabbage, habanero crema, and pico de gallo. Order a beer, margarita, or one of the Mexican soft drinks that line the front wall as you enter.

Avacados filled with guacamole with chips and margarita in background.
Guacamole and chips at Hablo Tacos.
Barb Gonzalez/Eater Portland

Related Maps