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Sautéed bok choy in sauce on a white plate.
Bok choy at Frank’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

12 Delightful Spots to Eat and Drink on Northeast Broadway

Explore where Portlanders spend their nights — and days — on Broadway

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Bok choy at Frank’s.
| Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Once ancillary to the then-bustling Lloyd Center and in the orbit of the Convention Center and Moda Center crowds, Northeast Broadway has developed an identity all its own, along with a regular base of patrons from nearby Irvington and Sullivan’s Gulch. Broadway’s dining and drinking options are on the casual end, even for Portland, making them ideal for a quick bite before a concert at the Moda, or a celebratory nightcap after a Trail Blazers win.

Though Broadway (the street) passes uninterrupted from downtown well into Rose City Park, for the purposes of this map we are defining the Northeast Broadway neighborhood as bound by Northeast Grand Ave and Northeast 33rd. For more neighborhood guides, feel free to check out our story stream.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Frank's Noodle House

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Making its home in a modest residential house built in 1906, the unassuming Frank’s specializes in heavenly hand-pulled noodles. Owners Frank Fong and Ying Jun Gao offer a menu including serviceable Chinese American favorites like General Tso’s chicken and shrimp fried rice, but for anyone who eats gluten, there’s no reason to opt for anything but the elite noodles, either stir-fried or pan-fried. And while a 2013 visit from Guy Fieri may have increased the lunchtime crowds, the noodles are as tender as ever.

A plate of house-pulled noodles in sauce.
Noodles at Frank’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Black Water

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Portland is thick with vegan bars, so the ones that last need more to define them than simply seitan. Broadway’s 100 percent vegan, punk-meets-metal Black Water has attitude in spades. After the closure of Alberta’s the Know, Black Water became a crucial venue in Portland’s punk scene, and as of 2022 it’s back to hosting multiple live shows each week. As for the food, Black Water competes with Portland’s best in vegan bar-food staples, with the wings being a particular favorite. Drinks range from the clever (and delicious) Kwisatz Sazerac to $2 cans of Rainier.

A poster of a skull eating a salad, with the text “Plant based. Vegan AF.”
Black Water.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Bluefin Tuna & Sushi

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It’s no accident that Bluefin puts tuna front-and-center in the name: The high quality tuna is the focus here, at this Japanese-by-way-of-Seoul spot. Toro, otoro, chutoro, and of course bluefin are specialties, though the restaurant offers plenty of other options from the Pacific’s bounty as well, including salmon, crab, sea urchin, prawns, and frequent specials. The rolled-up nigiri balls are a fun visual gimmick, but rest assured — this is serious sushi. Drinks include beer, wine, and a limited sake menu.

Taste Tickler

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Covertly located around the corner on Northeast 14th, on the ground floor of an early 1900s home more prominently housing a nail salon, Taste Tickler is a hidden lunchtime gem. Tasty sandwiches made with care range from Italian deli classics and Philly cheese steaks to kimchi bulgogi beef sandwiches and teriyaki chicken subs. With only one choice of bread, French, the toppings and sauces are the stars of the show here. Soft drinks are available bottled or from the fountain. There’s a small fluorescent-lit dining room, but expect to be elbow-to-elbow during a busy lunch hour.

Two hands hold a sandwich filled with ham, pepperoni, salami, sliced cucumbers, and parmesan from Taste Tickler in Portland, Oregon.
The Famous Tickler at Taste Tickler.
Ben Olsen / Eater Portland

Qiao Noodle House

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While nearby Frank’s inhabits a funky old craftsman house imbued with character, Qiao Noodle House’s generic modern storefront could make it easy to pass by as just another chain. That assumption would be dead wrong, as Qiao’s crossing-the-bridge noodle soup experience makes for an exciting and delicious personalized hot pot. The savory or spicy broths serve as a vibrant canvas for an individualized culinary painting — consider the golden broth that combines complex spicy and sour notes with the subtle sweetness of squash. Proteins include beef, pork, quail eggs, chicken gizzards, and tofu. Fresh vegetables, herbs, and mushrooms are close at-hand to add dimension and texture. Dine in the air-conditioned dining room or grab takeout.

Petisco

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Though Petisco is not, as the name might suggest to a hopeful Portland Lusophile, a dedicated Portuguese restaurant, it’s a delightful pan-European restaurant all the same, with a frequently rotating seasonal menu and an inviting basement dining space that receives plenty of light. The small dining room, warm staff, and nightly specials creates the feel of dinner over at a friend’s. The night’s menu can pull from all parts of the continent, with an emphasis on western Mediterranean fare — the house specialty is the monthly paella night, by reservation only. Petisco serves thoughtfully curated wines, limited beer, and refreshing cocktails.

Blossoming Lotus

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20 years in the Portland restaurant scene is an eon or two, so what was once striking — an entirely vegan restaurant — is now abundant. And while vegetarian and vegan dishes dot nearly ever menu in town today, and plenty of plant-based-only restaurants have sprung into existence, Blossoming Lotus remains a hallmark. From dishes that emulate carnivorous classics like the lentil-walnut burger or the BBQ soy curls, to fully raw dishes like the spicy live nachos or the vibrant taco salad, Blossoming Lotus covers the plant-based gamut. The bar serves both mocktails and cocktails, and features a modest wine and beer list. But the most celebrated beverages are the smoothies and juices — start the day with sweet-sour green lantern juice, or enjoy a smoothie as dessert with a pecan, banana, and cinnamon hot date.

Saint Simon Coffee Co.

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Enlightenment thinker Henri de Saint-Simon is perhaps best known for his then-radical notion that the needs of the working class should be paramount to society. Whether Saint Simon Coffee was named in honor of Henri or not, 21st century working Portland most certainly is powered by caffeine, and no place on Broadway combines quality espresso and inviting decor quite so well. Bucking the minimalist trend, Saint Simon is modern but funky, small but somehow never feeling cramped, even when all its seats are full. The beans are Coava — don’t miss the cold brew flights in the summer. Food is limited to pastries like chocolate chip cookies and almond scones.

Florid foam art on an espresso drink in a white coffee cup on a white saucer, with a small spoon next to it.
Cappuccino at Saint Simon.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Twisted Croissant

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While Portland is chock-full of good-to-great bakeries, truly God-tier croissants — airy and soft on the inside, flaky and buttery sweet on the outside — are somewhat rare, making Twisted Croissant a worthwhile destination even those far from Northeast Broadway. In addition to traditional French classics like the butter croissant and pan au chocolate, don’t be afraid to get twisted with creative seasonal alternatives like a Boston cream doughnut croissant or a raspberry-rose cruffin. The coffee is quite good, sparing patrons a trip to another coffee shop in the neighborhood. Twisted is currently takeout only.

Rose & Thistle Public House

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Rose & Thistle’s patio might be the most versatile in the city. Covered seating? Check. Sunny spots? Check. Multiple levels? You bet. Wide open areas for large groups and nooks for quieter dates? Yes and yes. This neighborhood haunt is beloved by regulars but in typical Portland fashion has a steady stream of new converts. The beer list represents all corners of the British Isles, and the sincere bartenders pour stiff, well balanced cocktails. The RAT is also a reliable spot to catch a Blazers, Thorns, or Timbers game.

The weathered street sign for the Rose & Thistle Restaurant.
Rose & Thistle.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland.

The Sports Bra

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Despite the conspicuous lack of a WNBA team, few American cities embrace women’s sports as enthusiastically as Portland. The Thorns boast the second highest attendance in the National Women’s Soccer League (after only much larger L.A.), and boosters of both University of Oregon and Oregon State are deeply passionate about women’s track, softball, basketball, soccer, and more. So the 2022 arrival of the Sports Bra — Portland’s first and, so far only, dedicated women’s sports bar — feels long overdue. The TVs are exclusively set to women’s sports, and the bar hosts watch parties for events like the World Track & Field Championships. The food and drink menus are no slouches, with plenty of vegan, vegetarian, and carnivore options, along with fun sports-themed specials like the Rockford Peach cocktail or the Naomi Osa-Caprese salad.

A chalkboard featuring a “Naomi Osa-Caprese Salad” special in front of the kitchen at The Sports Bra.
Specials board at The Sports Bra.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Hale Pele

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Perhaps no Portland Tiki establishment concocts as intoxicating a fantasy and Broadway’s Hale Pele, complete with sound effects, party-sized drinkable volcanoes, a “Chieftain’s Hut,” and plenty of fire. The drinks themselves are more than smoke and mirrors: Hale Pele’s bartenders are rum experts and can guide you through both the flashy drinks and some delicious simpler ones. The lines can get long here, but folks can reserve the Chieftain’s Hut ahead of time.

Frank's Noodle House

A plate of house-pulled noodles in sauce.
Noodles at Frank’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Making its home in a modest residential house built in 1906, the unassuming Frank’s specializes in heavenly hand-pulled noodles. Owners Frank Fong and Ying Jun Gao offer a menu including serviceable Chinese American favorites like General Tso’s chicken and shrimp fried rice, but for anyone who eats gluten, there’s no reason to opt for anything but the elite noodles, either stir-fried or pan-fried. And while a 2013 visit from Guy Fieri may have increased the lunchtime crowds, the noodles are as tender as ever.

A plate of house-pulled noodles in sauce.
Noodles at Frank’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Black Water

A poster of a skull eating a salad, with the text “Plant based. Vegan AF.”
Black Water.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Portland is thick with vegan bars, so the ones that last need more to define them than simply seitan. Broadway’s 100 percent vegan, punk-meets-metal Black Water has attitude in spades. After the closure of Alberta’s the Know, Black Water became a crucial venue in Portland’s punk scene, and as of 2022 it’s back to hosting multiple live shows each week. As for the food, Black Water competes with Portland’s best in vegan bar-food staples, with the wings being a particular favorite. Drinks range from the clever (and delicious) Kwisatz Sazerac to $2 cans of Rainier.

A poster of a skull eating a salad, with the text “Plant based. Vegan AF.”
Black Water.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Bluefin Tuna & Sushi

It’s no accident that Bluefin puts tuna front-and-center in the name: The high quality tuna is the focus here, at this Japanese-by-way-of-Seoul spot. Toro, otoro, chutoro, and of course bluefin are specialties, though the restaurant offers plenty of other options from the Pacific’s bounty as well, including salmon, crab, sea urchin, prawns, and frequent specials. The rolled-up nigiri balls are a fun visual gimmick, but rest assured — this is serious sushi. Drinks include beer, wine, and a limited sake menu.

Taste Tickler

Two hands hold a sandwich filled with ham, pepperoni, salami, sliced cucumbers, and parmesan from Taste Tickler in Portland, Oregon.
The Famous Tickler at Taste Tickler.
Ben Olsen / Eater Portland

Covertly located around the corner on Northeast 14th, on the ground floor of an early 1900s home more prominently housing a nail salon, Taste Tickler is a hidden lunchtime gem. Tasty sandwiches made with care range from Italian deli classics and Philly cheese steaks to kimchi bulgogi beef sandwiches and teriyaki chicken subs. With only one choice of bread, French, the toppings and sauces are the stars of the show here. Soft drinks are available bottled or from the fountain. There’s a small fluorescent-lit dining room, but expect to be elbow-to-elbow during a busy lunch hour.

Two hands hold a sandwich filled with ham, pepperoni, salami, sliced cucumbers, and parmesan from Taste Tickler in Portland, Oregon.
The Famous Tickler at Taste Tickler.
Ben Olsen / Eater Portland

Qiao Noodle House

While nearby Frank’s inhabits a funky old craftsman house imbued with character, Qiao Noodle House’s generic modern storefront could make it easy to pass by as just another chain. That assumption would be dead wrong, as Qiao’s crossing-the-bridge noodle soup experience makes for an exciting and delicious personalized hot pot. The savory or spicy broths serve as a vibrant canvas for an individualized culinary painting — consider the golden broth that combines complex spicy and sour notes with the subtle sweetness of squash. Proteins include beef, pork, quail eggs, chicken gizzards, and tofu. Fresh vegetables, herbs, and mushrooms are close at-hand to add dimension and texture. Dine in the air-conditioned dining room or grab takeout.

Petisco

Though Petisco is not, as the name might suggest to a hopeful Portland Lusophile, a dedicated Portuguese restaurant, it’s a delightful pan-European restaurant all the same, with a frequently rotating seasonal menu and an inviting basement dining space that receives plenty of light. The small dining room, warm staff, and nightly specials creates the feel of dinner over at a friend’s. The night’s menu can pull from all parts of the continent, with an emphasis on western Mediterranean fare — the house specialty is the monthly paella night, by reservation only. Petisco serves thoughtfully curated wines, limited beer, and refreshing cocktails.

Blossoming Lotus

20 years in the Portland restaurant scene is an eon or two, so what was once striking — an entirely vegan restaurant — is now abundant. And while vegetarian and vegan dishes dot nearly ever menu in town today, and plenty of plant-based-only restaurants have sprung into existence, Blossoming Lotus remains a hallmark. From dishes that emulate carnivorous classics like the lentil-walnut burger or the BBQ soy curls, to fully raw dishes like the spicy live nachos or the vibrant taco salad, Blossoming Lotus covers the plant-based gamut. The bar serves both mocktails and cocktails, and features a modest wine and beer list. But the most celebrated beverages are the smoothies and juices — start the day with sweet-sour green lantern juice, or enjoy a smoothie as dessert with a pecan, banana, and cinnamon hot date.

Saint Simon Coffee Co.

Florid foam art on an espresso drink in a white coffee cup on a white saucer, with a small spoon next to it.
Cappuccino at Saint Simon.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Enlightenment thinker Henri de Saint-Simon is perhaps best known for his then-radical notion that the needs of the working class should be paramount to society. Whether Saint Simon Coffee was named in honor of Henri or not, 21st century working Portland most certainly is powered by caffeine, and no place on Broadway combines quality espresso and inviting decor quite so well. Bucking the minimalist trend, Saint Simon is modern but funky, small but somehow never feeling cramped, even when all its seats are full. The beans are Coava — don’t miss the cold brew flights in the summer. Food is limited to pastries like chocolate chip cookies and almond scones.

Florid foam art on an espresso drink in a white coffee cup on a white saucer, with a small spoon next to it.
Cappuccino at Saint Simon.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Twisted Croissant

While Portland is chock-full of good-to-great bakeries, truly God-tier croissants — airy and soft on the inside, flaky and buttery sweet on the outside — are somewhat rare, making Twisted Croissant a worthwhile destination even those far from Northeast Broadway. In addition to traditional French classics like the butter croissant and pan au chocolate, don’t be afraid to get twisted with creative seasonal alternatives like a Boston cream doughnut croissant or a raspberry-rose cruffin. The coffee is quite good, sparing patrons a trip to another coffee shop in the neighborhood. Twisted is currently takeout only.

Rose & Thistle Public House

The weathered street sign for the Rose & Thistle Restaurant.
Rose & Thistle.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland.

Rose & Thistle’s patio might be the most versatile in the city. Covered seating? Check. Sunny spots? Check. Multiple levels? You bet. Wide open areas for large groups and nooks for quieter dates? Yes and yes. This neighborhood haunt is beloved by regulars but in typical Portland fashion has a steady stream of new converts. The beer list represents all corners of the British Isles, and the sincere bartenders pour stiff, well balanced cocktails. The RAT is also a reliable spot to catch a Blazers, Thorns, or Timbers game.

The weathered street sign for the Rose & Thistle Restaurant.
Rose & Thistle.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland.

The Sports Bra

A chalkboard featuring a “Naomi Osa-Caprese Salad” special in front of the kitchen at The Sports Bra.
Specials board at The Sports Bra.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Despite the conspicuous lack of a WNBA team, few American cities embrace women’s sports as enthusiastically as Portland. The Thorns boast the second highest attendance in the National Women’s Soccer League (after only much larger L.A.), and boosters of both University of Oregon and Oregon State are deeply passionate about women’s track, softball, basketball, soccer, and more. So the 2022 arrival of the Sports Bra — Portland’s first and, so far only, dedicated women’s sports bar — feels long overdue. The TVs are exclusively set to women’s sports, and the bar hosts watch parties for events like the World Track & Field Championships. The food and drink menus are no slouches, with plenty of vegan, vegetarian, and carnivore options, along with fun sports-themed specials like the Rockford Peach cocktail or the Naomi Osa-Caprese salad.

A chalkboard featuring a “Naomi Osa-Caprese Salad” special in front of the kitchen at The Sports Bra.
Specials board at The Sports Bra.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Hale Pele

Perhaps no Portland Tiki establishment concocts as intoxicating a fantasy and Broadway’s Hale Pele, complete with sound effects, party-sized drinkable volcanoes, a “Chieftain’s Hut,” and plenty of fire. The drinks themselves are more than smoke and mirrors: Hale Pele’s bartenders are rum experts and can guide you through both the flashy drinks and some delicious simpler ones. The lines can get long here, but folks can reserve the Chieftain’s Hut ahead of time.

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