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A pastrami sandwich stacked on ciabatta at Pasture in Portland, Oregon.
A pastrami sandwich from Pasture.
Pasture

17 Excellent Sandwich Shops to Try in Portland

From bánh mì to pastrami

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A pastrami sandwich from Pasture.
| Pasture

There are those who champion the burrito or wrap as the greatest vehicle for piles of more food. Others, the rice or noodle bowl. But for those who deem the sandwich supreme in delivering meat, cheese, and vegetables to your mouth, Portland has plenty of options.

Even nationally, Portland’s status as a sandwich destination has become the stuff of legend. Lardo has become a tourist magnet, so much so that they’re now posted up at the airport. Food personalities like J. Kenji Lopez-Alt go out of their way to stop at Jojo for a fried chicken sandwich. Spots like Sammich have appeared on the Food Network and national pubs like the Huffington Post. While the city has lost some of its sandwich greats in recent years — we’re looking at you, Summit Shack — there are still a number of stunning sandwich spots in town. From hot pastrami to cold deli subs to fried chicken sandwiches, here are the city’s top sandwich shops.

Note that this list is reserved for the non-breakfast and non-hamburger variety of sandwiches. For egg and cheese sandwiches, visit this list; burgers can be found here. Those looking for hot dogs here will sorely disappointed to learn that a hot dog is definitively not a sandwich.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Pasture PDX

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Farm Spirit alumni Kei Ohdera and John Schaible butcher, roast, smoke, and brine all of the Oregon-raised meats used in this Alberta Street restaurant’s sandwiches, which are often paired with Oregon-grown produce and house-made condiments. The resulting sandwiches are truly mind-blowing: a tender and delicate pastrami and house corned beef serve as the foundation for the shop’s Reuben, while a lamb-based “porchetta” complements roasted pork shoulder for the restaurant’s loose interpretation of a Cubano. It is simply impossible to go wrong here, but Pasture’s “O.G.” — something sort of like a banh mi with house pastrami and Oregon hazelnut chile oil — never misses.

Taste Tickler

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A consummate hole-in-the-wall, Taste Tickler has been serving its deli-style sandwiches to the Broadway crowd for decades now. Though it’s been passed down from owner to owner, the concept has stayed largely the same: traditional submarine sandwiches and bento dishes. Sandwiches here are topped with the usual fixings: mayonnaise, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, onions, and pepperoncini, along with provolone and parmesan. Ordering the eponymous Taste Tickler is a worthy choice, a sub sandwich with ham, salami, and pepperoni, and the usual toppings. However, another pro move is the restaurant’s take on a cheesesteak, which is something more like a bulgogi sub.

Break Bread

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This westside sandwich shop comes from fine dining alumni of the Michael Mina restaurant group, but don’t expect anything too pretentious here. Turkey fans adore Break Bread’s variations on the classic, whether it’s the Chubby Puggy with bacon jam and garlic aioli, or the Jimmy Pesto with pesto aioli and roasted red peppers. Smoked ham sandwiches are also winners here, in particular the Corleone with honey-roasted almonds.

A bright and sunny sandwich shop decked out with plants and Mexican artwork, Güero is all about the tortas. The restaurant’s takes on the classic Mexican sandwich come on a crispy telera roll, served hot with a variety of offerings including roasted meats like achiote-marinated chicken or braised beef; they’re joined by vegetarian sandwiches, from the fried masa and potato pancake to the refried bean sandwich. Most come with some manner of slaw, avocado, peppers, and cotija cheese, though there’s variety there, as well. The ahogado is an especially messy treat and an iconic menu item: Carlton Farms pork, habanero slaw, and cilantro comes on a grilled bolillo roll. It’s served with a side of achiote sauce for either dipping or, more traditionally, drenching the whole thing.

Laurelhurst Market

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One of the city’s most celebrated steakhouses is also a fantastic sandwich shop. During the day, this restaurant opens the butcher shop and deli, with an array of sandwiches utilizing Laurelhurst Market’s quality meats. For cold sandwiches, the house-smoked turkey and bacon on como bread is a surefire pleaser, topped with zucchini pickles, white cheddar, onion, and pile of fresh arugula. However, the restaurant’s roast beef — slathered with spicy pickle relish and horseradish cream — is an underrated stunner.

Sammich PDX

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Pastrami is the name of the game at Sammich, so much so that its companion food cart carried the same name as the flagship sandwich: the Pastrami Zombie. Chef and owner Melissa McMillan brines and smokes beef brisket in a process that takes nearly a week. The result: Beautifully tender, rich, and aromatic pastrami, stacked tall on rye bread with just a bit of slaw, mayo, and Swiss cheese. It’s such an immaculate sandwich that it’s easy to miss the other items on the menu, but after a few return visits it’s advisable to branch out to sandwiches like the Chicago Italian beef or the excellent burger, Da Burg. However, there’s no shame in sticking with the Zombie.

Snappy's

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Snappy’s opened just before the pandemic truly struck the city. The restaurant, a tiny shop with bodega vibes squeezed between Marukin Ramen and Nong’s Khao Man Gai, focuses on nailing a few diner staples, like a turkey club, tuna melt, patty melt, and chicken salad. However, the real draw is its take on a hot beef and cheddar, a delightfully sloppy pile of au jus dipped and griddled roast beef, cheddar, horseradish cream, and both griddled and fried onions. All the necessary sides — including Utz crab chips — are also available. 

It’s hard to imagine a sandwich shop in Portland more well-known and celebrated than Lardo. What started as a food truck ended up with four locations in greater Portland and Las Vegas, and today it still brings in the long lines for its meaty, over-the-top sandwiches. Its flagship is the Korean pork shoulder, topped with kimchi, cilantro, and a generous portion of chili mayo on fluffy ciabatta. It’s audacious, especially if paired with some pork-and-pepper-covered dirty fries, and sums up what Lardo is all about. However, for those looking for something new, each month the restaurant partners with a different chef for its “Chefwich,” which raises money for a cause of the guest chef’s choosing. You can usually spot the latest Chefwich on Instagram.

Tokyo Sando

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With shokupan sandwiches styled after the popular Japanese convenience store “sandos,” Tokyo Sando makes distinctive versions packed with flavor, from a gyoza scotch egg-filled special to a chicken nanban with tartar sauce and red cabbage. The shop’s miso pork katsu is a particular standout, crispy fried pork with a hearty dose of miso sauce and black garlic; it’s also available with tofu, for a vegan option.

Meat Cheese Bread

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This cozy little neighborhood spot has been a Buckman standby for over a decade, customers stopping in to enjoy its sandwiches, burritos, and coffee. There’s no real bad move at Meat Cheese Bread, which goes far beyond its name with all kinds of hot and cold vegetarian sandwiches, often changing seasonally. Still, basics like a turkey with bacon, fontina, and lettuce on sourdough can always be found. Its breakfast burritos are also a major hit. 

Papi Sal's

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In terms of sandwiches you literally could not find anywhere else, Papi Sal’s delivers in spades. Philadelphia meets Puerto Rico at this Southeast Hawthorne food cart, whether it’s in a pernil-and-provolone “jawn” with sofrito mayo and long hots, or the vegan oyster mushroom sandwich with roasted cauliflower and shallot mayo. Keep an eye on the cart’s Instagram for secret menu items and specials, like the chipped prosciutto and sofrito mayo Old Italian.

Demarco’s Sandwiches

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This SE Division food cart has become a favorite among East Coast expats craving old-school Italian grinders, hoagie rolls stretched wide and stuffed with breaded chicken cutlets, pork-and-beef meatballs, or thinly sliced eggplant. The cart’s Italian cold cut sub, however, is a thing of beauty, layers of ham, pepperoni, salami, and coppa topped with a pile of house giardiniera, hot peppers, shredded lettuce, onions, tomatoes, and the customary oil and vinegar.

A Demarco’s Italian sub comes topped with thinly sliced onion, tomatoes, and lettuce.
An Italian sub from Demarco’s.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

The Baker's Mark

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The Baker’s Mark has retained a loyal following thanks to its airy Dutch Crunch bread, a San Francisco specialty that makes for a satisfying first bite into a sandwich. Folks will find all the standards here — turkey blt, French dip, ham and cheese — with add-ons like house-made mustard and pepper salad. The MVP is likely the Godfather: salami, prosciutto, capicola, ham, and mortadella with provolone and the works.

Steakadelphia

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This Southeast Powell sandwich shop is all about the Philly cheesesteak, from the traditional with Cheez Whiz and onions to the “supremes” with added veggies and white American. These hulking sandwiches come with a choice of added toppings and the big three cheeses (wiz, white American, or provolone), as well as others like cheddar and pepperjack. However you order it, the foundational meat on Steakadelphia sandwiches is juicy, thinly shaved, and plentiful — as it should be.

Best Baguette

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A bánh mì institution, Best Baguette drive-thru lines have been reliably filled for years now. The quick and cheap sandwich and bubble tea shop offers a broad array of baguette sandwiches, each topped with mayo, slivered and pickled carrots and daikon, slices of jalapeno, and thick bunches of cilantro. It’s difficult to go wrong here, but newcomers should start with the Best Baguette Special, which comes with pate, ham, pork roll, and head cheese. Other standouts include the barbecue pork and grilled chicken. 

Jojo Food Truck

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It didn’t take long for this bright blue fried chicken food cart to gain some serious traction in the city. Despite its origins in a fairly rundown parking lot — now a more dedicated food cart pod with an adjoining market — Jojo’s fanbase quickly grew due to its golden-hued fried chicken sandwiches. Crispy, juicy chicken thighs are stacked high on fluffy buns, topped with shredded lettuce, pickles, and jojo sauce. The Southern fried chicken is the right move for first-timers but those wanting a little more flair can move on to the spicy chicken, which gets the addition of pepper relish, Crystal honey, and Alabama white mustard sauce. Those looking for something a little different should bee-line for the shokupan patty melts, which understand the importance of a good dose of caramelized onions. The whole affair is completed with an order of crispy, golden jojos that lend the cart its name. 

An Xuyên Bakery

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While places like Best Baguette may carry more name recognition, An Xuyên has quietly served some of the city’s best bánh mì to a faithful crowd for years now. The secret must be in the bread, baked daily in house. It manages to have a crispy, flaky crust, but stays perfectly soft the rest of the way through for ease of dining. Fillings range for the more traditional pate and Vietnamese ham to chipotle chicken, lemongrass pork, and vegetarian options including tofu or faux meat. All of them come with cucumbers, pickled carrot and daikon, cilantro, and jalapenos. Beyond the sandwiches, An Xuyên also carries savory and sweet bao, along with a plethora of baked goods from macarons to fluffy tea cakes. An Xuyên offers takeout with walk-in orders.

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Pasture PDX

Farm Spirit alumni Kei Ohdera and John Schaible butcher, roast, smoke, and brine all of the Oregon-raised meats used in this Alberta Street restaurant’s sandwiches, which are often paired with Oregon-grown produce and house-made condiments. The resulting sandwiches are truly mind-blowing: a tender and delicate pastrami and house corned beef serve as the foundation for the shop’s Reuben, while a lamb-based “porchetta” complements roasted pork shoulder for the restaurant’s loose interpretation of a Cubano. It is simply impossible to go wrong here, but Pasture’s “O.G.” — something sort of like a banh mi with house pastrami and Oregon hazelnut chile oil — never misses.

Taste Tickler

A consummate hole-in-the-wall, Taste Tickler has been serving its deli-style sandwiches to the Broadway crowd for decades now. Though it’s been passed down from owner to owner, the concept has stayed largely the same: traditional submarine sandwiches and bento dishes. Sandwiches here are topped with the usual fixings: mayonnaise, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles, onions, and pepperoncini, along with provolone and parmesan. Ordering the eponymous Taste Tickler is a worthy choice, a sub sandwich with ham, salami, and pepperoni, and the usual toppings. However, another pro move is the restaurant’s take on a cheesesteak, which is something more like a bulgogi sub.

Break Bread

This westside sandwich shop comes from fine dining alumni of the Michael Mina restaurant group, but don’t expect anything too pretentious here. Turkey fans adore Break Bread’s variations on the classic, whether it’s the Chubby Puggy with bacon jam and garlic aioli, or the Jimmy Pesto with pesto aioli and roasted red peppers. Smoked ham sandwiches are also winners here, in particular the Corleone with honey-roasted almonds.

Güero

A bright and sunny sandwich shop decked out with plants and Mexican artwork, Güero is all about the tortas. The restaurant’s takes on the classic Mexican sandwich come on a crispy telera roll, served hot with a variety of offerings including roasted meats like achiote-marinated chicken or braised beef; they’re joined by vegetarian sandwiches, from the fried masa and potato pancake to the refried bean sandwich. Most come with some manner of slaw, avocado, peppers, and cotija cheese, though there’s variety there, as well. The ahogado is an especially messy treat and an iconic menu item: Carlton Farms pork, habanero slaw, and cilantro comes on a grilled bolillo roll. It’s served with a side of achiote sauce for either dipping or, more traditionally, drenching the whole thing.

Laurelhurst Market

One of the city’s most celebrated steakhouses is also a fantastic sandwich shop. During the day, this restaurant opens the butcher shop and deli, with an array of sandwiches utilizing Laurelhurst Market’s quality meats. For cold sandwiches, the house-smoked turkey and bacon on como bread is a surefire pleaser, topped with zucchini pickles, white cheddar, onion, and pile of fresh arugula. However, the restaurant’s roast beef — slathered with spicy pickle relish and horseradish cream — is an underrated stunner.

Sammich PDX

Pastrami is the name of the game at Sammich, so much so that its companion food cart carried the same name as the flagship sandwich: the Pastrami Zombie. Chef and owner Melissa McMillan brines and smokes beef brisket in a process that takes nearly a week. The result: Beautifully tender, rich, and aromatic pastrami, stacked tall on rye bread with just a bit of slaw, mayo, and Swiss cheese. It’s such an immaculate sandwich that it’s easy to miss the other items on the menu, but after a few return visits it’s advisable to branch out to sandwiches like the Chicago Italian beef or the excellent burger, Da Burg. However, there’s no shame in sticking with the Zombie.

Snappy's

Snappy’s opened just before the pandemic truly struck the city. The restaurant, a tiny shop with bodega vibes squeezed between Marukin Ramen and Nong’s Khao Man Gai, focuses on nailing a few diner staples, like a turkey club, tuna melt, patty melt, and chicken salad. However, the real draw is its take on a hot beef and cheddar, a delightfully sloppy pile of au jus dipped and griddled roast beef, cheddar, horseradish cream, and both griddled and fried onions. All the necessary sides — including Utz crab chips — are also available. 

Lardo

It’s hard to imagine a sandwich shop in Portland more well-known and celebrated than Lardo. What started as a food truck ended up with four locations in greater Portland and Las Vegas, and today it still brings in the long lines for its meaty, over-the-top sandwiches. Its flagship is the Korean pork shoulder, topped with kimchi, cilantro, and a generous portion of chili mayo on fluffy ciabatta. It’s audacious, especially if paired with some pork-and-pepper-covered dirty fries, and sums up what Lardo is all about. However, for those looking for something new, each month the restaurant partners with a different chef for its “Chefwich,” which raises money for a cause of the guest chef’s choosing. You can usually spot the latest Chefwich on Instagram.

Tokyo Sando

With shokupan sandwiches styled after the popular Japanese convenience store “sandos,” Tokyo Sando makes distinctive versions packed with flavor, from a gyoza scotch egg-filled special to a chicken nanban with tartar sauce and red cabbage. The shop’s miso pork katsu is a particular standout, crispy fried pork with a hearty dose of miso sauce and black garlic; it’s also available with tofu, for a vegan option.

Meat Cheese Bread

This cozy little neighborhood spot has been a Buckman standby for over a decade, customers stopping in to enjoy its sandwiches, burritos, and coffee. There’s no real bad move at Meat Cheese Bread, which goes far beyond its name with all kinds of hot and cold vegetarian sandwiches, often changing seasonally. Still, basics like a turkey with bacon, fontina, and lettuce on sourdough can always be found. Its breakfast burritos are also a major hit. 

Papi Sal's

In terms of sandwiches you literally could not find anywhere else, Papi Sal’s delivers in spades. Philadelphia meets Puerto Rico at this Southeast Hawthorne food cart, whether it’s in a pernil-and-provolone “jawn” with sofrito mayo and long hots, or the vegan oyster mushroom sandwich with roasted cauliflower and shallot mayo. Keep an eye on the cart’s Instagram for secret menu items and specials, like the chipped prosciutto and sofrito mayo Old Italian.

Demarco’s Sandwiches

A Demarco’s Italian sub comes topped with thinly sliced onion, tomatoes, and lettuce.
An Italian sub from Demarco’s.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

This SE Division food cart has become a favorite among East Coast expats craving old-school Italian grinders, hoagie rolls stretched wide and stuffed with breaded chicken cutlets, pork-and-beef meatballs, or thinly sliced eggplant. The cart’s Italian cold cut sub, however, is a thing of beauty, layers of ham, pepperoni, salami, and coppa topped with a pile of house giardiniera, hot peppers, shredded lettuce, onions, tomatoes, and the customary oil and vinegar.

A Demarco’s Italian sub comes topped with thinly sliced onion, tomatoes, and lettuce.
An Italian sub from Demarco’s.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

The Baker's Mark

The Baker’s Mark has retained a loyal following thanks to its airy Dutch Crunch bread, a San Francisco specialty that makes for a satisfying first bite into a sandwich. Folks will find all the standards here — turkey blt, French dip, ham and cheese — with add-ons like house-made mustard and pepper salad. The MVP is likely the Godfather: salami, prosciutto, capicola, ham, and mortadella with provolone and the works.

Steakadelphia

This Southeast Powell sandwich shop is all about the Philly cheesesteak, from the traditional with Cheez Whiz and onions to the “supremes” with added veggies and white American. These hulking sandwiches come with a choice of added toppings and the big three cheeses (wiz, white American, or provolone), as well as others like cheddar and pepperjack. However you order it, the foundational meat on Steakadelphia sandwiches is juicy, thinly shaved, and plentiful — as it should be.

Best Baguette

A bánh mì institution, Best Baguette drive-thru lines have been reliably filled for years now. The quick and cheap sandwich and bubble tea shop offers a broad array of baguette sandwiches, each topped with mayo, slivered and pickled carrots and daikon, slices of jalapeno, and thick bunches of cilantro. It’s difficult to go wrong here, but newcomers should start with the Best Baguette Special, which comes with pate, ham, pork roll, and head cheese. Other standouts include the barbecue pork and grilled chicken. 

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Jojo Food Truck

It didn’t take long for this bright blue fried chicken food cart to gain some serious traction in the city. Despite its origins in a fairly rundown parking lot — now a more dedicated food cart pod with an adjoining market — Jojo’s fanbase quickly grew due to its golden-hued fried chicken sandwiches. Crispy, juicy chicken thighs are stacked high on fluffy buns, topped with shredded lettuce, pickles, and jojo sauce. The Southern fried chicken is the right move for first-timers but those wanting a little more flair can move on to the spicy chicken, which gets the addition of pepper relish, Crystal honey, and Alabama white mustard sauce. Those looking for something a little different should bee-line for the shokupan patty melts, which understand the importance of a good dose of caramelized onions. The whole affair is completed with an order of crispy, golden jojos that lend the cart its name. 

An Xuyên Bakery

While places like Best Baguette may carry more name recognition, An Xuyên has quietly served some of the city’s best bánh mì to a faithful crowd for years now. The secret must be in the bread, baked daily in house. It manages to have a crispy, flaky crust, but stays perfectly soft the rest of the way through for ease of dining. Fillings range for the more traditional pate and Vietnamese ham to chipotle chicken, lemongrass pork, and vegetarian options including tofu or faux meat. All of them come with cucumbers, pickled carrot and daikon, cilantro, and jalapenos. Beyond the sandwiches, An Xuyên also carries savory and sweet bao, along with a plethora of baked goods from macarons to fluffy tea cakes. An Xuyên offers takeout with walk-in orders.

Related Maps