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One of the oldest Portland steakhouses, Ringside serves everything from behemoth prime rib slabs to elegant grass-finished filet mignon
A steak at Ringside Steakhouse
Aubrie LeGault/Official

12 Steakhouses to Try in Portland and Beyond

Where to find tender filet mignon, juicy rib-eyes, and more

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A steak at Ringside Steakhouse
| Aubrie LeGault/Official

Although Portland remains one of the best cities for vegans, many of the Rose City’s residents remain loyal meat-eaters, from the conscious diners seeking humanely raised, grass-fed cows to the old-school, whiskey-drinking Portlanders ordering hulking slabs of inexpensive prime rib. And the city accommodates them both: There are the classic, white tablecloth steakhouses reminiscent of the Rat Pack era; the modern, hipper steakhouses with newer cuts and inventive flavors; and the old school family-owned restaurants that hearken back to memories with the grandparents.

This map of Portland’s steakhouses sticks to Portland-specific restaurants offering a selection of prime steak cuts, often aged for increased flavor. All restaurants included had to have at least three different steaks on the menu, and this map focuses on Pacific Northwest-grown spots as opposed to major chains. For more special occasion dinners, diners should scour our tasting menu map.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Clyde's Prime Rib Restaurant and Bar

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Clyde’s Prime Rib is some Old Portland realness. While the castle-like exterior is reminiscent of a miniature golf course, the dining room is moodily lit by chandeliers. Although the classic titular cut of beef might be the main draw, the bacon-wrapped tenderloin and sleeper hit lounge burger, just $9 on happy hour, are also worthy orders. Live jazz music on the weekends helps to amp up the mid-century vibes.

Ox Restaurant

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Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton’s James Beard Award-winning Argentinian American steakhouse is now a staple of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. In this cozy, brick-walled dining room, appetizers like smoked beef tongue carpaccio with crispy sweetbreads lead into 42-ounce bone-in rib-eyes and grass-fed filet mignon off the grill, accompanied by spinach and ricotta dumplings or maple-glazed heirloom carrots. Start with a bourbon-and-beet-syrup Ox Blood cocktail; finish with chocolate olive oil cake and Amarena cherries.

Ringside Steakhouse

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Since 1944, Ringside Steakhouse has been a tried-and-true standby for impeccable service, aged steaks, and old-school elegance. Tableside lamps illuminate lobster mashed potatoes and madeira-glazed mushrooms accompanying dry-aged rib-eyes and seasonal olive-fed American wagyu striploins. And of course, no meal at Ringside is complete without the James Beard-recommended battered onion rings with house dressing.

Laurelhurst Market

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Laurelhurst Market is considered one of the city’s top steakhouses for a reason: Everyone, from busser to bartender, is incredibly knowledgeable in the art of steaks, from the conditions of the cows to the intricacies of the cuts. The steaks are paired with gorgeous accoutrement — from an American Wagyu flank steak with celery root, beech mushroom conserva, and bone marrow butter to a rib-eye served with crispy potato pave, bravas sauce, and charred scallion aioli.

Portland City Grill

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The real draw to this 30th-floor, white-tablecloth restaurant is the panoramic windows of Portland, which are fantastic for both visitors and locals — the view never gets old, whether facing the cityscape or the river or the mountains. Menu highlights include the New York strip with caramelized shallot and roasted garlic butter and the filet mignon with leek and blue cheese compound butter; for things outside the steak canon, braised short ribs and lemongrass curry mussels are both standouts.

El Gaucho Portland

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El Gaucho exemplifies the old-school, fine-dining steakhouse experience, with a dark, elegant dining room full of white tablecloths and moody back rooms for smoking cigars. The steaks are dry-aged for 28 days, and include a multitude of different cuts grilled over charcoal. Diners ought to try the chateaubriand, a 20-ounce center cut of tenderloin for two, served with the classic steakhouse fixings; for those seeking something a little less daunting, the eight-ounce steak El Gaucho is a pristine filet mignon with lobster and béarnaise sauce.

Jake's Grill

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A Portland institution, Jake’s Grill has sat in downtown Portland for more than 25 years, while its sibling, Jake’s Famous Crawfish, has served seafood a claw’s throw away since 1892. Jake’s menu of broiled steaks are really about the add-ons, be it an au poivre treatment with a brandy peppercorn sauce, or the addition of Dungeness crab. The move is to order either with the restaurant’s 13-ounce rib-eye, raised at Washington’s Double R Ranch.

Sayler's Old Country Kitchen

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For over 70 years, Sayler’s has been serving cuts of steak in varying sizes as dinners complete with a relish tray, salad, bread, side dishes, and ice cream (spumoni? Hello?!). Don’t forget to add on a massive order of onion rings. The family-owned restaurant offers a slightly more laid-back atmosphere, perfect for seniors, kids, and groups of friends as an alternative to the sometimes romantic intensity of a dimly-lit steakhouse.

Urban Farmer Portland

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In the open-format lobby of the ultra-luxe Nines hotel, Urban Farmer is often overshadowed by the top dog upstairs; still, this chic and farm-centric restaurant is lovely in its own right, and very serious about the livelihood of its livestock. For each cut, the steakhouse provides a number of different styles; for instance, the restaurant offers two different Oregon rib-eyes — a grass-fed boneless from Carman Ranch and a bone-in, grain-finished from Painted Hills. Beyond the beef, the restaurant’s vegetable sides, like the wild mushrooms with port wine or white bean cassoulet, deserve attention.

Tokio Table - Japanese Steakhouse

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This Division Street Japanese Steakhouse specializes in teppanyaki, or the tableside grilling of meats on a flattop; however, steakhouse is the correct term to describe the restaurant, with its selection of New York, rib-eye, and filet mignon seared and basted with butter and mushrooms. Surf-and-turf is fairly easy here, with add-ons like scallops, lobster, shrimp, and a huge sushi selection. Big spenders should opt for Tokio Supreme, chateaubriand served with a grilled lobster tail.

The Steakhouse at 9900

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Tucked inside a Best Western motel, this Beaverton steakhouse with vaulted ceilings, wood paneling, and stacks of firewood feels like it belongs in another time, or in Twin Peaks. Diners can embrace the throwback vibe with old-school steakhouse favorites like a wedge salad, shrimp cocktail, and filet mignon with a baked potato. The space is also home to the Chamber, one of the surrounding area’s only public cigar lounges.

Grill68 Steakhouse

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At this Beaverton steakhouse, owned by Carlos Cortes of the nearby Mexican restaurant Casa Lola, cuts of Angus beef hit the grill and come dripping with an herb compound butter, be it a couples porterhouse or a rib-eye served with coconut prawns. Any meal should start with the restaurant’s burrata salad, which comes in a surprising mint-chile vinaigrette. S’mores made at the table make for a fun and interactive capper.

Clyde's Prime Rib Restaurant and Bar

Clyde’s Prime Rib is some Old Portland realness. While the castle-like exterior is reminiscent of a miniature golf course, the dining room is moodily lit by chandeliers. Although the classic titular cut of beef might be the main draw, the bacon-wrapped tenderloin and sleeper hit lounge burger, just $9 on happy hour, are also worthy orders. Live jazz music on the weekends helps to amp up the mid-century vibes.

Ox Restaurant

Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton and Greg Denton’s James Beard Award-winning Argentinian American steakhouse is now a staple of Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. In this cozy, brick-walled dining room, appetizers like smoked beef tongue carpaccio with crispy sweetbreads lead into 42-ounce bone-in rib-eyes and grass-fed filet mignon off the grill, accompanied by spinach and ricotta dumplings or maple-glazed heirloom carrots. Start with a bourbon-and-beet-syrup Ox Blood cocktail; finish with chocolate olive oil cake and Amarena cherries.

Ringside Steakhouse

Since 1944, Ringside Steakhouse has been a tried-and-true standby for impeccable service, aged steaks, and old-school elegance. Tableside lamps illuminate lobster mashed potatoes and madeira-glazed mushrooms accompanying dry-aged rib-eyes and seasonal olive-fed American wagyu striploins. And of course, no meal at Ringside is complete without the James Beard-recommended battered onion rings with house dressing.

Laurelhurst Market

Laurelhurst Market is considered one of the city’s top steakhouses for a reason: Everyone, from busser to bartender, is incredibly knowledgeable in the art of steaks, from the conditions of the cows to the intricacies of the cuts. The steaks are paired with gorgeous accoutrement — from an American Wagyu flank steak with celery root, beech mushroom conserva, and bone marrow butter to a rib-eye served with crispy potato pave, bravas sauce, and charred scallion aioli.

Portland City Grill

The real draw to this 30th-floor, white-tablecloth restaurant is the panoramic windows of Portland, which are fantastic for both visitors and locals — the view never gets old, whether facing the cityscape or the river or the mountains. Menu highlights include the New York strip with caramelized shallot and roasted garlic butter and the filet mignon with leek and blue cheese compound butter; for things outside the steak canon, braised short ribs and lemongrass curry mussels are both standouts.

El Gaucho Portland

El Gaucho exemplifies the old-school, fine-dining steakhouse experience, with a dark, elegant dining room full of white tablecloths and moody back rooms for smoking cigars. The steaks are dry-aged for 28 days, and include a multitude of different cuts grilled over charcoal. Diners ought to try the chateaubriand, a 20-ounce center cut of tenderloin for two, served with the classic steakhouse fixings; for those seeking something a little less daunting, the eight-ounce steak El Gaucho is a pristine filet mignon with lobster and béarnaise sauce.

Jake's Grill

A Portland institution, Jake’s Grill has sat in downtown Portland for more than 25 years, while its sibling, Jake’s Famous Crawfish, has served seafood a claw’s throw away since 1892. Jake’s menu of broiled steaks are really about the add-ons, be it an au poivre treatment with a brandy peppercorn sauce, or the addition of Dungeness crab. The move is to order either with the restaurant’s 13-ounce rib-eye, raised at Washington’s Double R Ranch.

Sayler's Old Country Kitchen

For over 70 years, Sayler’s has been serving cuts of steak in varying sizes as dinners complete with a relish tray, salad, bread, side dishes, and ice cream (spumoni? Hello?!). Don’t forget to add on a massive order of onion rings. The family-owned restaurant offers a slightly more laid-back atmosphere, perfect for seniors, kids, and groups of friends as an alternative to the sometimes romantic intensity of a dimly-lit steakhouse.

Urban Farmer Portland

In the open-format lobby of the ultra-luxe Nines hotel, Urban Farmer is often overshadowed by the top dog upstairs; still, this chic and farm-centric restaurant is lovely in its own right, and very serious about the livelihood of its livestock. For each cut, the steakhouse provides a number of different styles; for instance, the restaurant offers two different Oregon rib-eyes — a grass-fed boneless from Carman Ranch and a bone-in, grain-finished from Painted Hills. Beyond the beef, the restaurant’s vegetable sides, like the wild mushrooms with port wine or white bean cassoulet, deserve attention.

Tokio Table - Japanese Steakhouse

This Division Street Japanese Steakhouse specializes in teppanyaki, or the tableside grilling of meats on a flattop; however, steakhouse is the correct term to describe the restaurant, with its selection of New York, rib-eye, and filet mignon seared and basted with butter and mushrooms. Surf-and-turf is fairly easy here, with add-ons like scallops, lobster, shrimp, and a huge sushi selection. Big spenders should opt for Tokio Supreme, chateaubriand served with a grilled lobster tail.

The Steakhouse at 9900

Tucked inside a Best Western motel, this Beaverton steakhouse with vaulted ceilings, wood paneling, and stacks of firewood feels like it belongs in another time, or in Twin Peaks. Diners can embrace the throwback vibe with old-school steakhouse favorites like a wedge salad, shrimp cocktail, and filet mignon with a baked potato. The space is also home to the Chamber, one of the surrounding area’s only public cigar lounges.

Grill68 Steakhouse

At this Beaverton steakhouse, owned by Carlos Cortes of the nearby Mexican restaurant Casa Lola, cuts of Angus beef hit the grill and come dripping with an herb compound butter, be it a couples porterhouse or a rib-eye served with coconut prawns. Any meal should start with the restaurant’s burrata salad, which comes in a surprising mint-chile vinaigrette. S’mores made at the table make for a fun and interactive capper.

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