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A bowl of ceviche with hunks of raw fish, sweet potato, corn, and just a touch of fried calamari.
Ceviche at Casa Zoraya
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/EPDX

Where to Find Bright Bowls of Ceviche in Portland

Peruvian renditions with leche de tigre, vegan versions with coconut meat, and more

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Ceviche at Casa Zoraya
| Brooke Jackson-Glidden/EPDX

Portland’s diverse culinary scene, paired with its proximity to the ocean, make our city a prime spot for delectable, fresh ceviche. Ceviche typically consists of fresh seafood that’s been cured in citrus juice, though regional variations can be found throughout the Pacific coasts of South and Central America. In Peru, the dish relies on the heat of leche de tigre, the citrusy marinade bolstered with regional chiles; in places like Mexico, it often involves tomatoes and onion, occasionally served on a tostada.

Fortunately, Portland is home to a number of excellent restaurants specializing in a wide spectrum of Latin American fare, from mom-and-pops to ritzy spots. Some restaurants rotate their ceviche specials based on seasonal ingredients or chef’s inspiration, while others stick to fan-favorite recipes. And while ceviche is the most common spelling, order cebiche, seviche, and sebiche with confidence that they are all in the same family.

For more options, peruse our Latin American, Mexican, and Caribbean maps. Remember, maps are not ranked; they’re organized geographically.

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This Beaverton Peruvian restaurant is a neighborhood jewel, thanks to dishes like its beef heart anticuchos and arroz Chaufa. The ceviche mixto arrives under a nest of shaved onion, occasionally topped with a rocoto like a cherry on a sundae. It’s bright and citrus-heavy, with a good hit of ají amarillo, served alongside the customary sweet potato and Peruvian corn. Lima’s ceviche is best enjoyed while seated at one of the restaurant’s outdoor tables.

Rounding into its twentieth year, legendary Portland Peruvian restaurant Andina offers an appetizer cebiche cinco elementos with fresh market fish, red onion, and ají. Follow up the starter with a nautical entrée like pan-seared trout, vegetarian stir-fried mushrooms, or a half-chicken with ají panca barbecue sauce.

Carlita's

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This Pearl District restaurant with a bar-centric, upscale vibe is known for its wide range of craft cocktails. However, the food — in particular the ceviche — should not be missed. The bar offers a Pacific Ahi tuna ceviche and a cold water shrimp version, and the inclusion of radishes, avocado, cilantro, and cucumbers adds textural contrast while letting the quality of the seafood shine. Carlita’s marinates its ceviches in a chipotle vinaigrette, which adds a delicate smokiness that doesn’t overpower the fish.

Casa Zoraya

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Andina alumni Zoraya Zambrano and her children, Gary and Gloria Marmanillo, opened this North Portland Peruvian restaurant in 2018. Casa Zoraya’s ceviche seafood changes often, from Hawaiian ono to shrimp; however, the marinade remains the same, reliant on the heat of Peruvian peppers ají amarillo and rocoto. Peruvian toasted corn gives the ceviche a nice crunch, while the Peruvian corn on the cob and sweet potatoes add earthy sweetness to the fish.

King Tide Fish and Shell

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King Tide’s influences span globally — from Japanese curry empanada to clam spaghetti — but Peruvian-born chef Alexander Diestra’s experience as executive chef at Andina (also on this list) make his ono ceviche particularly worth seeking out. Diestra tops the delicately cured ono with shrimp, fried calamari, and crispy taro chips. Housed in the Kimpton Riverplace Hotel, King Tide boasts some of the best dining views in the city and can also be ordered as room service for hotel guests.

Palomar

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At the breezy, mid-century Cuban-themed cocktail bar Palomar, the food never takes a back seat to its terrific Caribbean cocktails. The ceviche de camarones doused in leche de tigre and pineapple is bright and sweet, served with a generous portion of plantain chips for a perfect shared appetizer. Pair with a Cuba Libre or a no-proof mojito. Palomar offers stylish ground floor bar and table seating; an intimate, shady mezzanine; and — in sunny months — one of the best rooftops in town.

Nuestra Cocina

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On a quieter corner of Southeast Division, the family-owned Nuestra Cocina is known as one of Portland’s original high-end Mexican restaurants. The changing chef’s choice ceviche is always a welcome surprise. Most often the ceviche contains shrimp, lime, and onion, however whatever the chef chooses for the day, it is likely a well-balanced, delightful dish.

Salt & Pepper Peruvian Food Cart

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At this Southeast Portland cart, Peruvian-born Rafael Luis Garcia dishes out fresh and vibrant fish ceviche, prepared in traditional Peruvian style. Garcia buys the fish daily, typically bass, and adds Peruvian toasted corn known as cancha for texture. The cilantro and onion highlight the citrus, while the Peruvian seaweed mococho and pepper ají limo help brighten the fish. Salt and Pepper offers delivery and takeout; the cart is not affiliated with the Salt and Pepper restaurant on Powell (also on this list).

Mestizo

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This Southeast Division gluten, red meat, and soy-free restaurant is serving some of the most inventive ceviche in town, which makes sense considering Mestizo’s focus on Mexican, Central, and South American vegan, vegetarian, and fish-centric food. The grilled pineapple shrimp ceviche is a wonderful balance of sweetness from the pineapple and lime in the citrus marinade, with added texture from red peppers, red onions, and a touch of spiciness from the jalapeños. The vegan coconut meat ceviche is surprisingly delicious, as well: The coconut cream helps smooth out the acid of the red onion, tomato, and serrano peppers, with a touch of piloncillo, or raw cane sugar, for fragrant sweetness.

Mariscos El Malecon

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Family-owned Mexican restaurant Mariscos el Malecon now has two locations, one in the Cully neighborhood and one near Gresham. Mariscos el Malecon’s ceviche uses a pico de gallo base, which highlights the seafood, be it octopus, shrimp, or tilapia. The ceviche comes in a cup or poured over a tostada, a common preparation in Mexico; this restaurant also serves other classic Mexican seafood preparations, including aguachile.

Salt & Pepper

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A low-key hidden gem in a neighborhood full of under-sung treasures. Salt & Pepper (no relation to the Peruvian cart of the same name also on this list) is accessed through a stairway inside the Mexican grocery El Campesino. Behind the modest lunch counter is a kitchen crafting phenomenal Peruvian staples like tallarin verde (spinach and basil pesto pasta topped with steak), cau cau beef stew, and of course spicy, citrusy ceviche made with market-fresh fish. Beverages include Peruvian sodas, purple corn and cinnamon chicha morada, and a creamy horchata.

Diced fish mixed with red onions, herbs, and vegetables.
Ceviche at Salt&Pepper.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Mariscos Tinto del Mar

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Sometimes, the buzz of Birrieria La Plaza draws the attention away from this neighboring seafood cart, but Mariscos Tinto del Mar holds its own, with micheladas served with a little cup of shrimp cocktail and its skyscraper of a torre de mariscos. The cart also sells an assortment of ceviches —  including shrimp and a mixed seafood ceviche — as well as a version brightened up with the addition of mango. The move is to order some ceviche and a few vampiros from Birrieria La Plaza, for the full experience.

Lima

This Beaverton Peruvian restaurant is a neighborhood jewel, thanks to dishes like its beef heart anticuchos and arroz Chaufa. The ceviche mixto arrives under a nest of shaved onion, occasionally topped with a rocoto like a cherry on a sundae. It’s bright and citrus-heavy, with a good hit of ají amarillo, served alongside the customary sweet potato and Peruvian corn. Lima’s ceviche is best enjoyed while seated at one of the restaurant’s outdoor tables.

Andina

Rounding into its twentieth year, legendary Portland Peruvian restaurant Andina offers an appetizer cebiche cinco elementos with fresh market fish, red onion, and ají. Follow up the starter with a nautical entrée like pan-seared trout, vegetarian stir-fried mushrooms, or a half-chicken with ají panca barbecue sauce.

Carlita's

This Pearl District restaurant with a bar-centric, upscale vibe is known for its wide range of craft cocktails. However, the food — in particular the ceviche — should not be missed. The bar offers a Pacific Ahi tuna ceviche and a cold water shrimp version, and the inclusion of radishes, avocado, cilantro, and cucumbers adds textural contrast while letting the quality of the seafood shine. Carlita’s marinates its ceviches in a chipotle vinaigrette, which adds a delicate smokiness that doesn’t overpower the fish.

Casa Zoraya

Andina alumni Zoraya Zambrano and her children, Gary and Gloria Marmanillo, opened this North Portland Peruvian restaurant in 2018. Casa Zoraya’s ceviche seafood changes often, from Hawaiian ono to shrimp; however, the marinade remains the same, reliant on the heat of Peruvian peppers ají amarillo and rocoto. Peruvian toasted corn gives the ceviche a nice crunch, while the Peruvian corn on the cob and sweet potatoes add earthy sweetness to the fish.

King Tide Fish and Shell

King Tide’s influences span globally — from Japanese curry empanada to clam spaghetti — but Peruvian-born chef Alexander Diestra’s experience as executive chef at Andina (also on this list) make his ono ceviche particularly worth seeking out. Diestra tops the delicately cured ono with shrimp, fried calamari, and crispy taro chips. Housed in the Kimpton Riverplace Hotel, King Tide boasts some of the best dining views in the city and can also be ordered as room service for hotel guests.

Palomar

At the breezy, mid-century Cuban-themed cocktail bar Palomar, the food never takes a back seat to its terrific Caribbean cocktails. The ceviche de camarones doused in leche de tigre and pineapple is bright and sweet, served with a generous portion of plantain chips for a perfect shared appetizer. Pair with a Cuba Libre or a no-proof mojito. Palomar offers stylish ground floor bar and table seating; an intimate, shady mezzanine; and — in sunny months — one of the best rooftops in town.

Nuestra Cocina

On a quieter corner of Southeast Division, the family-owned Nuestra Cocina is known as one of Portland’s original high-end Mexican restaurants. The changing chef’s choice ceviche is always a welcome surprise. Most often the ceviche contains shrimp, lime, and onion, however whatever the chef chooses for the day, it is likely a well-balanced, delightful dish.

Salt & Pepper Peruvian Food Cart

At this Southeast Portland cart, Peruvian-born Rafael Luis Garcia dishes out fresh and vibrant fish ceviche, prepared in traditional Peruvian style. Garcia buys the fish daily, typically bass, and adds Peruvian toasted corn known as cancha for texture. The cilantro and onion highlight the citrus, while the Peruvian seaweed mococho and pepper ají limo help brighten the fish. Salt and Pepper offers delivery and takeout; the cart is not affiliated with the Salt and Pepper restaurant on Powell (also on this list).

Mestizo

This Southeast Division gluten, red meat, and soy-free restaurant is serving some of the most inventive ceviche in town, which makes sense considering Mestizo’s focus on Mexican, Central, and South American vegan, vegetarian, and fish-centric food. The grilled pineapple shrimp ceviche is a wonderful balance of sweetness from the pineapple and lime in the citrus marinade, with added texture from red peppers, red onions, and a touch of spiciness from the jalapeños. The vegan coconut meat ceviche is surprisingly delicious, as well: The coconut cream helps smooth out the acid of the red onion, tomato, and serrano peppers, with a touch of piloncillo, or raw cane sugar, for fragrant sweetness.

Mariscos El Malecon

Family-owned Mexican restaurant Mariscos el Malecon now has two locations, one in the Cully neighborhood and one near Gresham. Mariscos el Malecon’s ceviche uses a pico de gallo base, which highlights the seafood, be it octopus, shrimp, or tilapia. The ceviche comes in a cup or poured over a tostada, a common preparation in Mexico; this restaurant also serves other classic Mexican seafood preparations, including aguachile.

Salt & Pepper

A low-key hidden gem in a neighborhood full of under-sung treasures. Salt & Pepper (no relation to the Peruvian cart of the same name also on this list) is accessed through a stairway inside the Mexican grocery El Campesino. Behind the modest lunch counter is a kitchen crafting phenomenal Peruvian staples like tallarin verde (spinach and basil pesto pasta topped with steak), cau cau beef stew, and of course spicy, citrusy ceviche made with market-fresh fish. Beverages include Peruvian sodas, purple corn and cinnamon chicha morada, and a creamy horchata.

Diced fish mixed with red onions, herbs, and vegetables.
Ceviche at Salt&Pepper.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Mariscos Tinto del Mar

Sometimes, the buzz of Birrieria La Plaza draws the attention away from this neighboring seafood cart, but Mariscos Tinto del Mar holds its own, with micheladas served with a little cup of shrimp cocktail and its skyscraper of a torre de mariscos. The cart also sells an assortment of ceviches —  including shrimp and a mixed seafood ceviche — as well as a version brightened up with the addition of mango. The move is to order some ceviche and a few vampiros from Birrieria La Plaza, for the full experience.

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