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The Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon.
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Where to Eat and Drink in Corvallis

The home of Oregon State University and the birthplace of the marionberry, Corvallis’s booming agricultural scene shows in its many restaurants and cafes

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The Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon.
| Bob Pool / Shutterstock

Nestled in the heart of the Willamette Valley, 90 minutes south of Portland, stands Corvallis, Oregon — the birthplace of the state’s famed marionberry. The city appeals to adventurers around the state with its abundance of forested hiking and biking trails, but tourists often miss out on the city’s agricultural riches. Surrounded by wineries, breweries, and farms, Corvallis’s food scene pulls much of its inspiration and ingredients from the land surrounding the city. At the same time, the large population of international students at Oregon State University has helped support and grow a diverse array of restaurants, food carts, and cafes. Taken together, Corvallis combines global and local to produce a multifaceted food scene—not bad for a city of 60,000 people.

From bechamel-topped crepes to pots of sizzling dolsot bibimbap, this map celebrates some of the best restaurants, food carts, and cafes around Corvallis — plus, a few noteworthy spots in nearby Philomath, for good measure. For more restaurants in the Mid-Valley, check out our Salem map.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Le Patissiér

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Cases of flaky croissants, pain au chocolat, and fruit tarts are an ode to French patisserie in this intimate nook tucked into the corner of a strip mall. Hailing from Lyon, France, chef Didier Tholognat makes all the viennoiseries and pastries in-house with a skill that can only come from decades of practice. The cafe sources its coffee from Oregon Coffee and Tea, a local roaster in downtown Corvallis, to offer a straightforward menu of smooth espresso and coffee beverages. Le Patissiér is currently open for to-go orders only. 

Yummy Yummy

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Tucked into the back of HK Asian Market, Yummy Yummy serves knockout Chinese food popular among OSU students, with dishes ranging from steaming xiao long bao to pork intestine in chili sauce to savory fish congee. The Sichuan dishes are where Yummy Yummy really shines, from full-flavored mapo tofu to dan dan noodles that are fiery and nutty with a hint of sweetness. Yummy Yummy is open for onsite dining, takeout, and delivery. 

Local Boyz Hawaiian Cafe

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This relaxed counter-service restaurant on the outskirts of Oregon State University’s campus can get crowded during the school year, as the go-to stop for college students, but the short wait is worth it for the Hawaiian-style plate lunches overflowing with sticky white rice, creamy mac salad, and expertly marinated char-grilled meats. Crowd favorites include the sweet shoyu chicken, which starts at $8, and beef sweet ribs. Be sure to try “da sauce”—a sweet, umami-packed house-made condiment. It’s currently open for takeout and onsite dining. 

Tian Fu Noodle / DIY Hotpot

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Across the street from Oregon State University, hidden under a blue awning, Tian Fu DIY Hotpot is a hidden gem that serves big bowls of rich, umami, mouth-numbing hot pot that start at $10. Before rebranding as a hot pot restaurant, Tian Fu sold an assortment of popular Sichuan dishes; since the change, the restaurant has continued to hold its fan base making Sichuan-style hot pot, peppery and splashed with a generous helping of chili oil. The menu allows for customizable hotpot but also provides various combos for those new to the experience, such as the garlicky “Tian Fu Pot,” composed of a spicy broth, green onions, brown vinegar, various veggies, sweet potato noodles, and the diner’s choice of meat — which includes several preparations of tofu. Tian Fu is open for to-go orders only. 

Sada Sushi & Izakaya

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Walk down several flights of stairs to enter the low-lit wood-paneled Sada Sushi & Izakaya. The restaurant specializes in handcrafted sushi and creative small plates, like the hamachi kama, grilled yellowtail collar, or the kaki furai, panko-fried oysters. Patrons can sit at the sushi bar and watch Osaka-raised chef Sada Sakamoto prepare succulent toro and fresh uni nigiri. Even more impressive, though, is the restaurant’s saké selection, which ranges from $8 to $25 per carafe. It’s open for dine-in and takeout. 

The Corvallis Meat Pie Shop

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The Corvallis Meat Pie Shop brings a taste of Australia to downtown Corvallis. Decorated with antique bits and bobs, Australian paraphernalia, and a few wooden bistro tables, the shop’s whimsical interior provides a homey dining experience to pair with its pastries. The menu features an assortment of savory pies wrapped in a buttery puff pastry, such as the beef and mushroom, laden with portobello mushrooms, peppery spices, and red wine gravy. The curry lamb is a particular standout, filled with aromatic vindaloo-spiced lamb bathed in a tangy tomato and yogurt sauce. Those who abstain from meat and dairy will also find vegetarian pies here, in flavors like black-bean-potato, stuffed with caramelized shallots and sweet spices, or impossible beef, made with umami-laden Vegemite and drenched in a rich gravy. It’s open for takeout and indoor dining. 

The Biere Library

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Opened during the pandemic, this book-lined space feels like a mix between a library and a European gastropub. Chef Travis Allen, an industry and U.S. military veteran, layers tomato and Andalouse sauce with savory meatballs and frites, drizzles bechamel over herbed crepes filled with ham and spinach, and fries potato-and-ale croquettes to order. The restaurant carries a masterful selection of imported Belgian beers, as well as several craft beers from around Portland, Seattle, and California. It’s worth checking out the website for frequent events. The Bière Library is currently open for indoor and outdoor (weather permitting) onsite dining, as well as takeout. 

Baguette Vietnamese Sandwiches

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Since Thanh Hoang and Huong Hoang opened Baguette in 2007, the cozy Vietnamese restaurant has been packed with regulars inhaling banh mi. Despite its popularity, Baguette’s service remains speedy, ideal for a quick mid-week lunch. The menu features sandwiches stacked with chả lụa (Vietnamese ham) and giò thủ (Vietnamese head cheese), as well as vegetarian options like curried tofu. It would be a mistake to leave without trying the beef lemongrass banh mi, sweet and smoky with a gentle kick. The restaurant is currently offering limited indoor seating and takeout. 

From shrimp and grits to crab gratin, Castor combines classic French and Creole cuisine with a touch of the Pacific Northwest to serve eclectic comfort meals in a dark and cool space. Chef Danielle Lewis changes the menu seasonally, based on what nearby farmers are growing and what seafood is available on the Oregon Coast. The gingery roasted beet salad harmonizes with carrots, radishes, and salad greens, ingredients that come from the restaurant’s three main produce sources — Rainshine Family Farm, Groundwork Organics, and Gathering Together Farm, all within a 30-mile radius. For something more substantial, the restaurant’s pork chop, served in a syrupy glaze with crispy potatoes, caramelized onions, Brussels sprouts, and vibrant creole mustard, travels 50 miles south, from Carlton Farms. Castor is open for onsite dining and takeout. 

Koriander

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This casual pan-Asian restaurant specializes in Korean food, with a few Japanese and Thai dishes in the mix for good measure. Those looking for sizzling dolsot bibimbap, simmering bowls of bulgogi ddukbaegi, or crispy pork katsu will not be disappointed with the restaurant’s impressive portions. Most of the entrees are accompanied by banchan, a collection of house-made Korean side dishes like kongjang (sweet simmered soybeans), ojingeochae bokkeum (dried shredded squid), and oi muchim (spicy cucumber salad). Diners can finish their meal with a scoop of the restaurant’s house-made gelato. Koriander is open for indoor dining and takeout. 

Block 15 Brewing Co.

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This laid-back brewery in downtown Corvallis also features pub fare made with Willamette Valley produce and meats. While the Oregon-raised beef burgers and house-made sandwiches do the job, the restaurant’s selling point is its artfully crafted hoppy ales, crisp lagers, and barrel-aged stouts that nod toward fresh ingredients and sustainable brewing practices. It’s nearly impossible to avoid a wait here, but once seated, patrons can tap into their creative side by doodling on the restaurant’s chalkboard tables. The restaurant is open for limited indoor and patio dining, as well as takeout. 

Tacos El Machin

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With little more than a window decal to signal its existence, Tacos El Machin is easy to miss, but its simple street-style that start at $3 endlessly impress locals. Half indoor bar, half food cart, Tacos El Machin offers a commendable selection of meats, including cabeza, lengua, al pastor, tripa, and more; tacos come with the customary fresh onions, cilantro, and lime, but patrons can choose to add pickled onions, grilled onions, and radishes. The taqueria serves six different house-made salsas as accompaniments, including a fiery habanero to a milder green tomatillo. It’s open for onsite dining and takeout. 

Del Alma Restaurant

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Overlooking the Willamette River, the upscale Del Alma draws inspiration from Latin American, Caribbean, and Spanish flavors. Adobo-rubbed filet mignon arrives topped with smokey blue cheese butter and a shiitake mushroom roasted garlic jus, while chili-spiced cauliflower “chorizo” flautas, sitting in a smoky salsa ranchera, come sprinkled with caramelized cotija. For drink pairings, Del Alma’s extensive wine list includes German rieslings, Oregon pinot, and Spanish tempranillos; the cocktail menu includes a number of inventive drinks, including the restaurant’s take on a mojito, made with house-infused chocolate, cinnamon, and yerba maté rum. Every Wednesday, the restaurant offers a three-course prix fixe for $30. It’s open for indoor dining and takeout. 

Common Fields

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Among a renovated transmission shop sits Common Fields, a taproom and food cart incubator located in downtown Corvallis. The site is home to Mediterranean cart Kalamata Bistro and ZIA Southwest Cuisine, which combines New Mexican cuisine and Pacific Northwestern staples. Common Fields specifically seeks out carts that carry cuisines not represented in Corvallis, and new carts, such as Pupuseria Del Valle, which will arrive in May. The draft list offers 16 taps pouring lagers, stouts, IPAs, and wild and sour ales from independently owned Oregon craft breweries. It hosts recurring weekly events, such as a Monday game night and live music on Wednesdays and Thursdays, as well as monthly comedy and drag shows. It’s open for onsite (dog-friendly) dining, as well as takeout. 

The Dizzy Hen

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This farmhouse-esque breakfast and lunch spot in nearby Philomath serves everything from bread pudding French toast and house-made biscuits and gravy to pork ragu with grits and vegan lentil cake hash. Making almost everything from scratch, the Dizzy Hen also emphasizes seasonal and local items, sourcing ingredients from the neighboring Gathering Together Farm and Meg’s Eggs. Visitors shouldn’t leave without picking up a morning bun — a sticky, sweet pastry that lands somewhere between a French cruller and cinnamon roll. It’s currently open for dine-in and takeout. 

Gathering Together Farm

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On this produce farm lies a wooden farmstand and patio surrounded by trees and shrubbery; like the food, the space feels organic. Open seasonally, Gathering Together Farm’s restaurant pulls produce from the property for lunch and dinner service, changing menus weekly; dishes range from hand-made pappardelle pasta topped with vegetable confit to coast-caught black cod with Siletz tomatoes, cucumbers, and sweet onions, as well as char-dotted, wood-fired pizza. Gathering Together Farm is open for onsite dining and to-go meals, with reservations available.

Le Patissiér

Cases of flaky croissants, pain au chocolat, and fruit tarts are an ode to French patisserie in this intimate nook tucked into the corner of a strip mall. Hailing from Lyon, France, chef Didier Tholognat makes all the viennoiseries and pastries in-house with a skill that can only come from decades of practice. The cafe sources its coffee from Oregon Coffee and Tea, a local roaster in downtown Corvallis, to offer a straightforward menu of smooth espresso and coffee beverages. Le Patissiér is currently open for to-go orders only. 

Yummy Yummy

Tucked into the back of HK Asian Market, Yummy Yummy serves knockout Chinese food popular among OSU students, with dishes ranging from steaming xiao long bao to pork intestine in chili sauce to savory fish congee. The Sichuan dishes are where Yummy Yummy really shines, from full-flavored mapo tofu to dan dan noodles that are fiery and nutty with a hint of sweetness. Yummy Yummy is open for onsite dining, takeout, and delivery. 

Local Boyz Hawaiian Cafe

This relaxed counter-service restaurant on the outskirts of Oregon State University’s campus can get crowded during the school year, as the go-to stop for college students, but the short wait is worth it for the Hawaiian-style plate lunches overflowing with sticky white rice, creamy mac salad, and expertly marinated char-grilled meats. Crowd favorites include the sweet shoyu chicken, which starts at $8, and beef sweet ribs. Be sure to try “da sauce”—a sweet, umami-packed house-made condiment. It’s currently open for takeout and onsite dining. 

Tian Fu Noodle / DIY Hotpot

Across the street from Oregon State University, hidden under a blue awning, Tian Fu DIY Hotpot is a hidden gem that serves big bowls of rich, umami, mouth-numbing hot pot that start at $10. Before rebranding as a hot pot restaurant, Tian Fu sold an assortment of popular Sichuan dishes; since the change, the restaurant has continued to hold its fan base making Sichuan-style hot pot, peppery and splashed with a generous helping of chili oil. The menu allows for customizable hotpot but also provides various combos for those new to the experience, such as the garlicky “Tian Fu Pot,” composed of a spicy broth, green onions, brown vinegar, various veggies, sweet potato noodles, and the diner’s choice of meat — which includes several preparations of tofu. Tian Fu is open for to-go orders only. 

Sada Sushi & Izakaya

Walk down several flights of stairs to enter the low-lit wood-paneled Sada Sushi & Izakaya. The restaurant specializes in handcrafted sushi and creative small plates, like the hamachi kama, grilled yellowtail collar, or the kaki furai, panko-fried oysters. Patrons can sit at the sushi bar and watch Osaka-raised chef Sada Sakamoto prepare succulent toro and fresh uni nigiri. Even more impressive, though, is the restaurant’s saké selection, which ranges from $8 to $25 per carafe. It’s open for dine-in and takeout. 

The Corvallis Meat Pie Shop

The Corvallis Meat Pie Shop brings a taste of Australia to downtown Corvallis. Decorated with antique bits and bobs, Australian paraphernalia, and a few wooden bistro tables, the shop’s whimsical interior provides a homey dining experience to pair with its pastries. The menu features an assortment of savory pies wrapped in a buttery puff pastry, such as the beef and mushroom, laden with portobello mushrooms, peppery spices, and red wine gravy. The curry lamb is a particular standout, filled with aromatic vindaloo-spiced lamb bathed in a tangy tomato and yogurt sauce. Those who abstain from meat and dairy will also find vegetarian pies here, in flavors like black-bean-potato, stuffed with caramelized shallots and sweet spices, or impossible beef, made with umami-laden Vegemite and drenched in a rich gravy. It’s open for takeout and indoor dining. 

The Biere Library

Opened during the pandemic, this book-lined space feels like a mix between a library and a European gastropub. Chef Travis Allen, an industry and U.S. military veteran, layers tomato and Andalouse sauce with savory meatballs and frites, drizzles bechamel over herbed crepes filled with ham and spinach, and fries potato-and-ale croquettes to order. The restaurant carries a masterful selection of imported Belgian beers, as well as several craft beers from around Portland, Seattle, and California. It’s worth checking out the website for frequent events. The Bière Library is currently open for indoor and outdoor (weather permitting) onsite dining, as well as takeout. 

Baguette Vietnamese Sandwiches

Since Thanh Hoang and Huong Hoang opened Baguette in 2007, the cozy Vietnamese restaurant has been packed with regulars inhaling banh mi. Despite its popularity, Baguette’s service remains speedy, ideal for a quick mid-week lunch. The menu features sandwiches stacked with chả lụa (Vietnamese ham) and giò thủ (Vietnamese head cheese), as well as vegetarian options like curried tofu. It would be a mistake to leave without trying the beef lemongrass banh mi, sweet and smoky with a gentle kick. The restaurant is currently offering limited indoor seating and takeout. 

Castor

From shrimp and grits to crab gratin, Castor combines classic French and Creole cuisine with a touch of the Pacific Northwest to serve eclectic comfort meals in a dark and cool space. Chef Danielle Lewis changes the menu seasonally, based on what nearby farmers are growing and what seafood is available on the Oregon Coast. The gingery roasted beet salad harmonizes with carrots, radishes, and salad greens, ingredients that come from the restaurant’s three main produce sources — Rainshine Family Farm, Groundwork Organics, and Gathering Together Farm, all within a 30-mile radius. For something more substantial, the restaurant’s pork chop, served in a syrupy glaze with crispy potatoes, caramelized onions, Brussels sprouts, and vibrant creole mustard, travels 50 miles south, from Carlton Farms. Castor is open for onsite dining and takeout. 

Koriander

This casual pan-Asian restaurant specializes in Korean food, with a few Japanese and Thai dishes in the mix for good measure. Those looking for sizzling dolsot bibimbap, simmering bowls of bulgogi ddukbaegi, or crispy pork katsu will not be disappointed with the restaurant’s impressive portions. Most of the entrees are accompanied by banchan, a collection of house-made Korean side dishes like kongjang (sweet simmered soybeans), ojingeochae bokkeum (dried shredded squid), and oi muchim (spicy cucumber salad). Diners can finish their meal with a scoop of the restaurant’s house-made gelato. Koriander is open for indoor dining and takeout. 

Block 15 Brewing Co.

This laid-back brewery in downtown Corvallis also features pub fare made with Willamette Valley produce and meats. While the Oregon-raised beef burgers and house-made sandwiches do the job, the restaurant’s selling point is its artfully crafted hoppy ales, crisp lagers, and barrel-aged stouts that nod toward fresh ingredients and sustainable brewing practices. It’s nearly impossible to avoid a wait here, but once seated, patrons can tap into their creative side by doodling on the restaurant’s chalkboard tables. The restaurant is open for limited indoor and patio dining, as well as takeout. 

Tacos El Machin

With little more than a window decal to signal its existence, Tacos El Machin is easy to miss, but its simple street-style that start at $3 endlessly impress locals. Half indoor bar, half food cart, Tacos El Machin offers a commendable selection of meats, including cabeza, lengua, al pastor, tripa, and more; tacos come with the customary fresh onions, cilantro, and lime, but patrons can choose to add pickled onions, grilled onions, and radishes. The taqueria serves six different house-made salsas as accompaniments, including a fiery habanero to a milder green tomatillo. It’s open for onsite dining and takeout. 

Del Alma Restaurant

Overlooking the Willamette River, the upscale Del Alma draws inspiration from Latin American, Caribbean, and Spanish flavors. Adobo-rubbed filet mignon arrives topped with smokey blue cheese butter and a shiitake mushroom roasted garlic jus, while chili-spiced cauliflower “chorizo” flautas, sitting in a smoky salsa ranchera, come sprinkled with caramelized cotija. For drink pairings, Del Alma’s extensive wine list includes German rieslings, Oregon pinot, and Spanish tempranillos; the cocktail menu includes a number of inventive drinks, including the restaurant’s take on a mojito, made with house-infused chocolate, cinnamon, and yerba maté rum. Every Wednesday, the restaurant offers a three-course prix fixe for $30. It’s open for indoor dining and takeout. 

Common Fields

Among a renovated transmission shop sits Common Fields, a taproom and food cart incubator located in downtown Corvallis. The site is home to Mediterranean cart Kalamata Bistro and ZIA Southwest Cuisine, which combines New Mexican cuisine and Pacific Northwestern staples. Common Fields specifically seeks out carts that carry cuisines not represented in Corvallis, and new carts, such as Pupuseria Del Valle, which will arrive in May. The draft list offers 16 taps pouring lagers, stouts, IPAs, and wild and sour ales from independently owned Oregon craft breweries. It hosts recurring weekly events, such as a Monday game night and live music on Wednesdays and Thursdays, as well as monthly comedy and drag shows. It’s open for onsite (dog-friendly) dining, as well as takeout. 

The Dizzy Hen

This farmhouse-esque breakfast and lunch spot in nearby Philomath serves everything from bread pudding French toast and house-made biscuits and gravy to pork ragu with grits and vegan lentil cake hash. Making almost everything from scratch, the Dizzy Hen also emphasizes seasonal and local items, sourcing ingredients from the neighboring Gathering Together Farm and Meg’s Eggs. Visitors shouldn’t leave without picking up a morning bun — a sticky, sweet pastry that lands somewhere between a French cruller and cinnamon roll. It’s currently open for dine-in and takeout. 

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Gathering Together Farm

On this produce farm lies a wooden farmstand and patio surrounded by trees and shrubbery; like the food, the space feels organic. Open seasonally, Gathering Together Farm’s restaurant pulls produce from the property for lunch and dinner service, changing menus weekly; dishes range from hand-made pappardelle pasta topped with vegetable confit to coast-caught black cod with Siletz tomatoes, cucumbers, and sweet onions, as well as char-dotted, wood-fired pizza. Gathering Together Farm is open for onsite dining and to-go meals, with reservations available.

Related Maps