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A takeout container from Baon Kainan in Portland Oregon, filled with two pieces of chicken in a light brown sauce, topped with pickled daikon and carrots and steamed bok choy.
Chicken adobo in a smoked tamari and vinegar sauce with garlic rice at Filipino food cart Baon Kainan.
Molly J. Smith/EPDX

Where to Find Fantastic Filipino Food in Portland

Where to find the best adobo, lechon, and pancit around the city

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Chicken adobo in a smoked tamari and vinegar sauce with garlic rice at Filipino food cart Baon Kainan.
| Molly J. Smith/EPDX

Filipinos are the second-largest Asian-American group in the United States, but in cities like Portland with a smaller population of Filipino Americans, the density of Pinoy restaurants is often dwarfed by other Southeast Asian cuisines like Thai and Vietnamese. Those unfamiliar with the cuisine and the city’s restaurants, however, are missing out: From the salty tang of adobo to the sweet-and-buttery swirl of a fresh-baked ensaymada, Pinoy cuisine balances salty, sweet, and sour, often with a hint of welcome bitterness.

While we might lack an extensive Filipino dining scene — meaning much of the food is made in home kitchens as opposed to restaurants — Portland’s Pinoy offerings have been growing exponentially in recent years. More and more pop-ups have emerged selling Filipino fare, like the chicken adobo pot pies at Allie G’s Pastries, ube butter mochi at Halo Halo, and the tasting menu at Tikim. Pop-ups like Leslie’s Lumpia now selling frozen ube and veggie lumpia in grocery store freezer aisles. And thanks to the cross-cultural nature of Filipino cuisine, Hawaiian spots like Grind Wit Tryz often have favorites like sweet Filipino spaghetti on the menu. In true Portland style, Filipino chefs don’t shy from tweaking tradition, drenching fries in kare kare or stuffing smoked brisket into golden-fried lumpia. This map isn’t ranked; rather, it’s organized geographically.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Hunny Beez

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Located in a small pod in the back of an Aloha shopping center, Hunny Beez describes itself as “backyard barbecue with a Filipino twist,” which translates to a menu incorporating both big burgers topped with smoked bacon, mango slaw, and peanut sauce and traditional soups like pork lugaw and chicken sotanghon. Grilled chicken, smoked pulled pork, and beef brisket star in combo plates, get stuffed into lumpia, and are sold by the pound. Delivery and takeout are available.

With walls clad in rough-hewn wood planks and bamboo, Kubo, in a Bethany shopping center, has a modern aesthetic while keeping the menu classic. Kubo sells staples like lumpiang sariwa and lechon kawali, as well as a number of sweets like buko salad, the Pinoy answer to ambrosia, and sapin-sapin in all of its colorful layered glory. Kubo is open for takeout, delivery, and has outdoor seating.

While Derby isn’t strictly a Filipino restaurant, owner Judith Stokes often incorporates Filipino ingredients into her menus: Customers order sides of garlicky longganisa with mini macadamia waffles smothered in pandan condensed cream, plus an ube pandesal, a sweet roll swirled with earthy purple yam, for the road. Derby is open for onsite dining and takeout, with online ordering.

St. Barbra Pinoy Bakery

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While downtown’s St. Barbra Pinoy Bakery obviously turns out stellar baked goods — including plenty with ube — the small shop also offers savories like empanadas, breakfast burritos filled with longganisa sausage and rice, plus silogs, Filipino breakfast dishes with garlic fried rice, meat of choice, and a fried egg. Drop in for takeout orders; on nice days, they’re best enjoyed in the nearby Duniway Park Lilac Garden.

Pulu by Sunrice

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This pop-up currently resides at the Southeast Portland bar Deadshot Wednesdays through Saturdays, with dishes like crackly lechon giving way to tender pork belly and steak inihaw made with Carman Ranch rib-eye and tangy sinamak. Pulu by Sunrice blends its chefs Filipino and Vietnamese culinary backgrounds, which means the menu here is a creative departure from the Filipino standbys — for example, the pork skewers arrive glazed in a gastrique with both banana ketchup and nước mắm. Pulu by Sunrice is open for onsite dining.

Magna Kusina

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After a long hiatus and fresh of a Food & Wine Best New Chefs win, Carlo Lamagna has reopened his groundbreaking Filipino restaurant in Southeast Portland, with a fresh menu that lends itself to a variety of experiences. Those looking for a snack and a calamansi soda can order an assortment of tuhog, skewers with charcoal-grilled pork intestine, chicken hearts, or rib-eye, with an order of crispy lumpia stuffed with pork and mushrooms. Those ready for a celebratory dinner should opt for Lamagna’s inventive takes on Pinoy standards, like a duck dinuguan that trades the standard blood-based stew with a “blood salsa.” Regardless of the approach, any meal should finish with Lamagna’s charred biko. It’s open for onsite dining, also hosting pop-ups like Allie G’s Pastries.

Baon Kainan

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This Northeast Portland food cart, parked near Metalwood Salvage in Cully, skyrocketed to legend status soon after its summer opening. Its menu is small but mighty; any visit should involve the cart’s chicken adobo, though the rotating specials — Filipino spaghetti, plump-shrimp-filled sinigang, longganisa-stuffed lumpia — are often knockouts. Baon Kainan is open for walk-ups and pre-orders.

Tambayan Restaurant

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Along with Fork and Spoon House, Foster-Powell’s Tambayan is one of the longstanding Filipino restaurants in Portland. The menu is also comprehensive, offering multiple versions of sinigang, the sour soup flavored with tamarind, four versions of pancit, and kare-kare with either traditional oxtails or beef. Tambayan is open for takeout.

Fork And Spoon Food House

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Parkrose Filipino restaurant Fork and Spoon House has a tight menu of favorites like pork adobo, pinakbet, and kare-kare, plus sisig fries, an invention using the chopped, grilled pork and onions as a topping. Dishes like longsilog, sweet pork with garlic fried rice and a fried egg, bangsilog with fried milk fish as opposed to pork, and spamsilog, which is what it sounds like, are among the restaurant’s breakfast offerings. The restaurant is open for takeout and delivery.

Kuya’s Islander Cuisine

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Kuya’s Islander Cuisine started as the cart Kuya Fred’s, but now operates as a full-blown restaurant in Gresham with silog variations, bowls of steamy bulalo with beef shanks and marrow, pancit, and adobo, as well as combo plates for a little taste of everything. Like many local Filipino businesses, it also offers catering for large groups. The restaurant is open for takeout and delivery, as well as onsite dining.

Hunny Beez

Located in a small pod in the back of an Aloha shopping center, Hunny Beez describes itself as “backyard barbecue with a Filipino twist,” which translates to a menu incorporating both big burgers topped with smoked bacon, mango slaw, and peanut sauce and traditional soups like pork lugaw and chicken sotanghon. Grilled chicken, smoked pulled pork, and beef brisket star in combo plates, get stuffed into lumpia, and are sold by the pound. Delivery and takeout are available.

Kubo

With walls clad in rough-hewn wood planks and bamboo, Kubo, in a Bethany shopping center, has a modern aesthetic while keeping the menu classic. Kubo sells staples like lumpiang sariwa and lechon kawali, as well as a number of sweets like buko salad, the Pinoy answer to ambrosia, and sapin-sapin in all of its colorful layered glory. Kubo is open for takeout, delivery, and has outdoor seating.

Derby

While Derby isn’t strictly a Filipino restaurant, owner Judith Stokes often incorporates Filipino ingredients into her menus: Customers order sides of garlicky longganisa with mini macadamia waffles smothered in pandan condensed cream, plus an ube pandesal, a sweet roll swirled with earthy purple yam, for the road. Derby is open for onsite dining and takeout, with online ordering.

St. Barbra Pinoy Bakery

While downtown’s St. Barbra Pinoy Bakery obviously turns out stellar baked goods — including plenty with ube — the small shop also offers savories like empanadas, breakfast burritos filled with longganisa sausage and rice, plus silogs, Filipino breakfast dishes with garlic fried rice, meat of choice, and a fried egg. Drop in for takeout orders; on nice days, they’re best enjoyed in the nearby Duniway Park Lilac Garden.

Pulu by Sunrice

This pop-up currently resides at the Southeast Portland bar Deadshot Wednesdays through Saturdays, with dishes like crackly lechon giving way to tender pork belly and steak inihaw made with Carman Ranch rib-eye and tangy sinamak. Pulu by Sunrice blends its chefs Filipino and Vietnamese culinary backgrounds, which means the menu here is a creative departure from the Filipino standbys — for example, the pork skewers arrive glazed in a gastrique with both banana ketchup and nước mắm. Pulu by Sunrice is open for onsite dining.

Magna Kusina

After a long hiatus and fresh of a Food & Wine Best New Chefs win, Carlo Lamagna has reopened his groundbreaking Filipino restaurant in Southeast Portland, with a fresh menu that lends itself to a variety of experiences. Those looking for a snack and a calamansi soda can order an assortment of tuhog, skewers with charcoal-grilled pork intestine, chicken hearts, or rib-eye, with an order of crispy lumpia stuffed with pork and mushrooms. Those ready for a celebratory dinner should opt for Lamagna’s inventive takes on Pinoy standards, like a duck dinuguan that trades the standard blood-based stew with a “blood salsa.” Regardless of the approach, any meal should finish with Lamagna’s charred biko. It’s open for onsite dining, also hosting pop-ups like Allie G’s Pastries.

Baon Kainan

This Northeast Portland food cart, parked near Metalwood Salvage in Cully, skyrocketed to legend status soon after its summer opening. Its menu is small but mighty; any visit should involve the cart’s chicken adobo, though the rotating specials — Filipino spaghetti, plump-shrimp-filled sinigang, longganisa-stuffed lumpia — are often knockouts. Baon Kainan is open for walk-ups and pre-orders.

Tambayan Restaurant

Along with Fork and Spoon House, Foster-Powell’s Tambayan is one of the longstanding Filipino restaurants in Portland. The menu is also comprehensive, offering multiple versions of sinigang, the sour soup flavored with tamarind, four versions of pancit, and kare-kare with either traditional oxtails or beef. Tambayan is open for takeout.

Fork And Spoon Food House

Parkrose Filipino restaurant Fork and Spoon House has a tight menu of favorites like pork adobo, pinakbet, and kare-kare, plus sisig fries, an invention using the chopped, grilled pork and onions as a topping. Dishes like longsilog, sweet pork with garlic fried rice and a fried egg, bangsilog with fried milk fish as opposed to pork, and spamsilog, which is what it sounds like, are among the restaurant’s breakfast offerings. The restaurant is open for takeout and delivery.

Kuya’s Islander Cuisine

Kuya’s Islander Cuisine started as the cart Kuya Fred’s, but now operates as a full-blown restaurant in Gresham with silog variations, bowls of steamy bulalo with beef shanks and marrow, pancit, and adobo, as well as combo plates for a little taste of everything. Like many local Filipino businesses, it also offers catering for large groups. The restaurant is open for takeout and delivery, as well as onsite dining.

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