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A picture of two breaded chunks of fish with medium-cut fries, a tiny bowl of slaw, and two lemon slices at Crazy Norwegian’s
Fish and chips at Crazy Norwegian’s in Port Orford
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

14 Fish and Chips Spots Worth Their Salt on the Oregon Coast

The sunset over the ocean is even more stunning with a basket of crispy fish and golden fries

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Fish and chips at Crazy Norwegian’s in Port Orford
| Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Oregon has always loved its seafood. Dried pounded salmon and baked wapato were the fish and chips of yesteryear; tribes came from as far as the plains states to trade for them at the gatherings at Celilo Falls. Later on, Oregon was a haven for British trappers and immigrants, though it’s unclear when fish and chips arrived along the coast; regardless, there’s a longstanding tradition of fish and tubers in Oregon.

Today, fish and chips has become a staple on the Oregon Coast. Bars, fish markets, and oceanside restaurants often keep some sort of fish-and-fries on the menu, with basic options like cod, halibut, and salmon. For years, the Oregon Coast has attracted seafood lovers in search of fried local specialties; still, many fish-and-chip aficionados end up disappointed by less-than-fresh fish in less-than-ideal surroundings.

After scouring the coastline’s shacks, bistros, carts, and fisher-owned markets from Astoria to Brookings, we’ve rounded up the indispensable spots frying up supreme baskets of fried piscine nuggets. Presented here from north to south, fish and chip stops in notable settings made the list, especially those featuring wild fish sourced off the Oregon shores — ling cod, rockfish, albacore. For more varied dining on the Oregon Coast, this map of top restaurants may be a better fit.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

South Bay Wild Fish House

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In a town that has mastered its fish and chips game, relative newcomer South Bay Wild Fish House holds its own. Co-owner Rob Seitz fishes off his own boat and supplies some of the catch for the kitchen and deli case; Tiffani Seitz runs the cozy two-story restaurant filled with historical photos of Astoria and vintage fishing gear. There, they serve thin, golden-fried french fries, house vinaigrette slaw, and battered wild fish, including mild flatfish petrale sole, a bit sweeter and moister rockfish, and even sustainably fished salmon in season. They’re best enjoyed at the long communal table upcycled from AMCO, the defunct local shipyard, with a few Astoria’s Reveille Ciderworks ciders.

A basket of fried salmon fingers, chips and cole slaw with an iced tea behind it on a table.
Nerka salmon and chips special, South Bay Wild Fish House, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Bowpicker Fish and Chips

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When asked their favorite place to order fish and chips on the coast, many Oregonians single out Astoria’s beloved Bowpicker Fish & Chips. This 28-foot converted wooden boat once gillnetted for salmon on the Columbia, but now the boat delivers a different catch of the day: lightly beer-battered (and particularly crispy) chunks of juicy fresh albacore served with thick steak fries. Diners often wait in surprisingly long lines to choose either a five-piece whole order or a three-piece half, tartar sauce or no, and take the steps down from the deck to a few picnic tables. Bad weather closes up shop, since the boat is an open kitchen concept—so open, in fact, that rain can pour into the galley.

A wood boat with stairs leading up one side. A wood fisherman stands on the bow, overlooking the street.
Converted gillnet boat serves as the Bowpicker’s galley, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Enola’s Ship Out Fish & Chips

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Enola’s Ship Out is the afterlife of The Ship Inn, a longtime fish hut housed on Astoria’s waterfront from 1974 to 2017. When the latter closed, former employee Enola Baeten took up the fry basket, serving some of the classics from an off-the-beaten-path cart painted with a Lower Columbia waterscape. It’s worth the short drive across Old Youngs Bay Bridge for serious talent: hand-dipped chunks of halibut, giant prawns, or a heaping serving of calamari strips compete with an irresistible mound of seasoned fries and creamy slaw.

Two baskets of fish and chips on a plaid tablecloth covered picnic table, with maritime memorabilia on the walls, including the bottom half of a diving suit.
Calamari strips and halibut fish and chips at Enola’s Ship Out, Astoria, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Grizzly Tuna

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Just off the side of Highway 101, Grizzly Tuna is Seaside’s fish and chips version of a coffee kiosk — drive-through service for a fresh basket of hot, slightly oily delight. Like Bowpicker, Grizzly Tuna specializes only in local, sustainable albacore for its bread-crumby version of the classic, excluding the weekend-only tuna tacos. A smart choice, too, since albacore is as firm and flavorful as it is plentiful in season. On a nice day, patrons can sit at cheery red picnic tables with a view of cars inching through traffic, but a picnic on the beach is undoubtedly the best move.

basket of fried albacore and chips on a red picnic table.
Grizzly Tuna food truck’s outdoor picnic tables, Seaside, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market

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After a fire swept through this Cannon Beach landmark in July 2018, the Beckman family rebuilt Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market with a cozier seating area and expansive deli case. Big hunks of batter-fried Pacific cod, halibut, wild salmon, and tuna appear on the menu year round, alongside large prawns, calamari, and razor clam baskets with the same thin, crunchy fries. All that being said, Ecola Seafoods supplies the restaurant with fish from its own two boats, so it’s worth it to ask which fish are local and fresh that day.

Busy interior of a restaurant with a line at the deli case featuring fresh seafood on ice.
Renovated interior, Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market, Cannon Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Riverside Fish & Chips

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In the summer months, kayakers on the Nehalem River pull up to the bank at Riverside Fish & Chips to fuel up with a 3-piece basket of Pacific cod, chips, and a side of creamy slaw. Open from March through September, this busy food truck is nestled away behind a row of shops on the short main drag in Nehalem and can be accessed streetside via a small alley. Seating is mostly outdoor on shaded picnic tables, with some cover over a patio behind a local antique store. Regulars give thumbs up to the light, non-oily beer batter, and the organic Portland Ketchup served with otherwise basic fries.

Two people standing at a food truck serving fish and chips, surrounded by picnic tables and other seating on the bank of a river.
Riverside Fish and Chips on the Nehalem River in Nehalem, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Sea Baron Fish & Chips

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Sea Baron’s deep ocean blue truck turns out some of the absolutely best fish and chips on the coast. Sure, one can get a cup of owner Michael Thomas’ special recipe clam chowder on the side, too, but perhaps it’s better to save room for a 5-piece whole order of local ling cod or albacore, bought from fishers at the bustling Port of Garibaldi and fried in Pelican Brewing Co. ale batter. Open for the season in May, the truck operates from a less-than-picturesque gravel lot on the side of Highway 101, but a covered seating area allows for dining there, and nearby Tillamook Bay beckons.

a basket of fish and chips with condiments in front of a dark blue food truck with a logo of a fish.
Sea Baron Fish & Chips food truck, Garibaldi, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Sportsman's Pub-n-Grub

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One of many dive bars on the coast serving up a fried fish basket, Sportsman’s distinguishes itself from the pack with dory-caught, breaded and deep-fried local ling cod and rockfish. Opened in 1947, the tavern bustles with locals playing pool or watching the game from the bar. Neon beer signs and video poker machines light the way for fishermen after a day fishing on Pacific City’s traditional open-hull skiffs called dories, which launch off the beach and fish near shore. Plates are served with crinkle-cut fries and a large serving of coleslaw, plus plenty of lemon wedges for the piping hot, succulently greasy fillets of mild white fish.

South Beach Fish Market

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A hub of activity in otherwise sleepy South Beach (south of Newport), South Beach Fish Market’s blue and yellow shack with wood fish cutouts and a UFO on the roof draws in coasties and the curious. Inside, a soft haze of oil hangs over the procedings in a no-nonsense shop, as an almost perpetual line mulls over the remarkable array of fresh, smoked, and pickled seafood in the case. A single-page, typed menu presents a selection for fried baskets: wild jumbo prawns, wild Oregon popcorn shrimp, halibut, Chinook salmon, razor clams, clam strips, oysters, and “calamari tubes and tentacles,” all battered and deep-fried to order. Fries are a wiser choice than the dry rice pilaf, taking to go a wiser choice than eating at one of the often grimy tables, ordering a side of salmon candy a wiser choice than not.

A sign and picnic tables outside a colorful seafood market.
Exterior of South Beach Fish Market, South Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Luna Sea Fish House and Village Fishmonger

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A tiny spot in tiny Yachats garners big raves for the ling cod and chips at Luna Sea, a fisherman-owned bistro and market serving fresh fish from Oregon and beyond. The cole slaw accompaniment is pleasantly sweet with fresh apple; the Texas toast and chubby fries ensure no one goes away hungry. Unlike Alaska-caught cod, ling is not a true cod, but it’s a favorite with Oregon fishing families, including Luna Sea’s owner Robert Anthony. When fried, the flesh flakes off in wide and smooth pieces that are firmer than rockfish, but not as dense as halibut. The restaurant recently expanded into new spaces that relieve pressure on its small 6-table main dining area: a sheltered, pet-friendly outdoor area and a new “blue room” for additional seating.

A basket of fish and chips with Texas toast.
Ling cod and chips at Luna Sea, Yachats, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Schooner Inn Cafe

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Smack on the water with an umbrella-studded open deck on the Umpqua River just before it flows into the Pacific, the Schooner Inn offers a limited menu, including a worthy fish and chips plate served with a big scoop of tangy red-and-green cabbage slaw. Lightly battered, the snow-white cod is often fried just ‘til blonde, and portions aren’t overwhelming, well-suited to such a hearty meal. Regulars swap out the fries for the excellent tots, or order one of the appealingly large salads topped with dried fruits and chopped vegetables. Diners can enjoy the view of the old train bridge across the river, or stroll over to the Umpqua Discovery Center next door for exhibits on the area’s history and geology.

The Boat

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In 2017, Cassie Hamilton pulled up her converted floating houseboat restaurant from Winchester Bay and moved the operation to nearby Coos Bay. Dry-docked on northbound Highway 101, The Boat attracts flocks of locals for fried oysters and hand-cut halibut, as well as the more standard cod and shrimp fry. Slaw can be subbed for decent fries or added for an additional price. Outdoor deck seating overlooks cool vintage trains and logging equipment in the Oregon Coast Historic Railway train yard next door, especially pretty adorned with lights during the holidays.

The Boat, Coos Bay, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

The Crazy Norwegian’s Fish and Chips

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It’s simply not a trip to the South Coast without a stop at Crazy’s, or so it’s been called by locals for decades, in Port Orford. Sometimes it seems a little crazy indeed, with big summertime lunch and dinner crowds clamoring for huge plates of well fried, crispy battered Alaskan cod with an unusual tarragon-flecked tartar sauce. Fortunately, one of the most beautiful views on the entire coast is a quick walk away, so owner Dianne Hosford advises savvy patrons to add their names to the list and come back after working up an appetite in the breezy hills overlooking the sandy cove of Battle Rock beach. After tourist season ends in October, the fish hut often has immediate seating, and constantly changing specials, including Port Orford rockfish and chips. One of the shop’s heaping slices of fruit pie isn’t a bad way to end a meal.

Cod and chips, The Crazy Norwegian’s, Port Orford, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

Catalyst Seafood

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The Goergen family has been fishing the Pacific since 1955, so it was a natural choice to name their first full-service restaurant after their fishing vessel Catalyst; for visitors to the far south of the Oregon coast, it’s the best bet for reliable local seafood. Occupying a low-slung building with a modest sign near the port in Harbor, inside is surprisingly intimate with dark walls and simple wood and nautical furnishings. Depending on what’s been landed, the fish and chips basket might contain firm and juicy albacore or flaky ling cod, always piled on top of slightly spicy, seasoned fries; a recent Captain Platter special contained batter-fried nuggets of ling cod cheeks, oysters and prawns, little popcorn scallops, and calamari strips with a mound of fries or a salad. It may not all be local, but it sure does hit the spot.

South Bay Wild Fish House

A basket of fried salmon fingers, chips and cole slaw with an iced tea behind it on a table.
Nerka salmon and chips special, South Bay Wild Fish House, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

In a town that has mastered its fish and chips game, relative newcomer South Bay Wild Fish House holds its own. Co-owner Rob Seitz fishes off his own boat and supplies some of the catch for the kitchen and deli case; Tiffani Seitz runs the cozy two-story restaurant filled with historical photos of Astoria and vintage fishing gear. There, they serve thin, golden-fried french fries, house vinaigrette slaw, and battered wild fish, including mild flatfish petrale sole, a bit sweeter and moister rockfish, and even sustainably fished salmon in season. They’re best enjoyed at the long communal table upcycled from AMCO, the defunct local shipyard, with a few Astoria’s Reveille Ciderworks ciders.

A basket of fried salmon fingers, chips and cole slaw with an iced tea behind it on a table.
Nerka salmon and chips special, South Bay Wild Fish House, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Bowpicker Fish and Chips

A wood boat with stairs leading up one side. A wood fisherman stands on the bow, overlooking the street.
Converted gillnet boat serves as the Bowpicker’s galley, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

When asked their favorite place to order fish and chips on the coast, many Oregonians single out Astoria’s beloved Bowpicker Fish & Chips. This 28-foot converted wooden boat once gillnetted for salmon on the Columbia, but now the boat delivers a different catch of the day: lightly beer-battered (and particularly crispy) chunks of juicy fresh albacore served with thick steak fries. Diners often wait in surprisingly long lines to choose either a five-piece whole order or a three-piece half, tartar sauce or no, and take the steps down from the deck to a few picnic tables. Bad weather closes up shop, since the boat is an open kitchen concept—so open, in fact, that rain can pour into the galley.

A wood boat with stairs leading up one side. A wood fisherman stands on the bow, overlooking the street.
Converted gillnet boat serves as the Bowpicker’s galley, Astoria, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Enola’s Ship Out Fish & Chips

Two baskets of fish and chips on a plaid tablecloth covered picnic table, with maritime memorabilia on the walls, including the bottom half of a diving suit.
Calamari strips and halibut fish and chips at Enola’s Ship Out, Astoria, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Enola’s Ship Out is the afterlife of The Ship Inn, a longtime fish hut housed on Astoria’s waterfront from 1974 to 2017. When the latter closed, former employee Enola Baeten took up the fry basket, serving some of the classics from an off-the-beaten-path cart painted with a Lower Columbia waterscape. It’s worth the short drive across Old Youngs Bay Bridge for serious talent: hand-dipped chunks of halibut, giant prawns, or a heaping serving of calamari strips compete with an irresistible mound of seasoned fries and creamy slaw.

Two baskets of fish and chips on a plaid tablecloth covered picnic table, with maritime memorabilia on the walls, including the bottom half of a diving suit.
Calamari strips and halibut fish and chips at Enola’s Ship Out, Astoria, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Grizzly Tuna

basket of fried albacore and chips on a red picnic table.
Grizzly Tuna food truck’s outdoor picnic tables, Seaside, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Just off the side of Highway 101, Grizzly Tuna is Seaside’s fish and chips version of a coffee kiosk — drive-through service for a fresh basket of hot, slightly oily delight. Like Bowpicker, Grizzly Tuna specializes only in local, sustainable albacore for its bread-crumby version of the classic, excluding the weekend-only tuna tacos. A smart choice, too, since albacore is as firm and flavorful as it is plentiful in season. On a nice day, patrons can sit at cheery red picnic tables with a view of cars inching through traffic, but a picnic on the beach is undoubtedly the best move.

basket of fried albacore and chips on a red picnic table.
Grizzly Tuna food truck’s outdoor picnic tables, Seaside, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market

Busy interior of a restaurant with a line at the deli case featuring fresh seafood on ice.
Renovated interior, Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market, Cannon Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

After a fire swept through this Cannon Beach landmark in July 2018, the Beckman family rebuilt Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market with a cozier seating area and expansive deli case. Big hunks of batter-fried Pacific cod, halibut, wild salmon, and tuna appear on the menu year round, alongside large prawns, calamari, and razor clam baskets with the same thin, crunchy fries. All that being said, Ecola Seafoods supplies the restaurant with fish from its own two boats, so it’s worth it to ask which fish are local and fresh that day.

Busy interior of a restaurant with a line at the deli case featuring fresh seafood on ice.
Renovated interior, Ecola Seafoods Restaurant & Market, Cannon Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Riverside Fish & Chips

Two people standing at a food truck serving fish and chips, surrounded by picnic tables and other seating on the bank of a river.
Riverside Fish and Chips on the Nehalem River in Nehalem, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

In the summer months, kayakers on the Nehalem River pull up to the bank at Riverside Fish & Chips to fuel up with a 3-piece basket of Pacific cod, chips, and a side of creamy slaw. Open from March through September, this busy food truck is nestled away behind a row of shops on the short main drag in Nehalem and can be accessed streetside via a small alley. Seating is mostly outdoor on shaded picnic tables, with some cover over a patio behind a local antique store. Regulars give thumbs up to the light, non-oily beer batter, and the organic Portland Ketchup served with otherwise basic fries.

Two people standing at a food truck serving fish and chips, surrounded by picnic tables and other seating on the bank of a river.
Riverside Fish and Chips on the Nehalem River in Nehalem, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Sea Baron Fish & Chips

a basket of fish and chips with condiments in front of a dark blue food truck with a logo of a fish.
Sea Baron Fish & Chips food truck, Garibaldi, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Sea Baron’s deep ocean blue truck turns out some of the absolutely best fish and chips on the coast. Sure, one can get a cup of owner Michael Thomas’ special recipe clam chowder on the side, too, but perhaps it’s better to save room for a 5-piece whole order of local ling cod or albacore, bought from fishers at the bustling Port of Garibaldi and fried in Pelican Brewing Co. ale batter. Open for the season in May, the truck operates from a less-than-picturesque gravel lot on the side of Highway 101, but a covered seating area allows for dining there, and nearby Tillamook Bay beckons.

a basket of fish and chips with condiments in front of a dark blue food truck with a logo of a fish.
Sea Baron Fish & Chips food truck, Garibaldi, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Sportsman's Pub-n-Grub

One of many dive bars on the coast serving up a fried fish basket, Sportsman’s distinguishes itself from the pack with dory-caught, breaded and deep-fried local ling cod and rockfish. Opened in 1947, the tavern bustles with locals playing pool or watching the game from the bar. Neon beer signs and video poker machines light the way for fishermen after a day fishing on Pacific City’s traditional open-hull skiffs called dories, which launch off the beach and fish near shore. Plates are served with crinkle-cut fries and a large serving of coleslaw, plus plenty of lemon wedges for the piping hot, succulently greasy fillets of mild white fish.

South Beach Fish Market

A sign and picnic tables outside a colorful seafood market.
Exterior of South Beach Fish Market, South Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

A hub of activity in otherwise sleepy South Beach (south of Newport), South Beach Fish Market’s blue and yellow shack with wood fish cutouts and a UFO on the roof draws in coasties and the curious. Inside, a soft haze of oil hangs over the procedings in a no-nonsense shop, as an almost perpetual line mulls over the remarkable array of fresh, smoked, and pickled seafood in the case. A single-page, typed menu presents a selection for fried baskets: wild jumbo prawns, wild Oregon popcorn shrimp, halibut, Chinook salmon, razor clams, clam strips, oysters, and “calamari tubes and tentacles,” all battered and deep-fried to order. Fries are a wiser choice than the dry rice pilaf, taking to go a wiser choice than eating at one of the often grimy tables, ordering a side of salmon candy a wiser choice than not.

A sign and picnic tables outside a colorful seafood market.
Exterior of South Beach Fish Market, South Beach, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Luna Sea Fish House and Village Fishmonger

A basket of fish and chips with Texas toast.
Ling cod and chips at Luna Sea, Yachats, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

A tiny spot in tiny Yachats garners big raves for the ling cod and chips at Luna Sea, a fisherman-owned bistro and market serving fresh fish from Oregon and beyond. The cole slaw accompaniment is pleasantly sweet with fresh apple; the Texas toast and chubby fries ensure no one goes away hungry. Unlike Alaska-caught cod, ling is not a true cod, but it’s a favorite with Oregon fishing families, including Luna Sea’s owner Robert Anthony. When fried, the flesh flakes off in wide and smooth pieces that are firmer than rockfish, but not as dense as halibut. The restaurant recently expanded into new spaces that relieve pressure on its small 6-table main dining area: a sheltered, pet-friendly outdoor area and a new “blue room” for additional seating.

A basket of fish and chips with Texas toast.
Ling cod and chips at Luna Sea, Yachats, OR.
Jennifer Burns Bright/EPDX

Schooner Inn Cafe

Smack on the water with an umbrella-studded open deck on the Umpqua River just before it flows into the Pacific, the Schooner Inn offers a limited menu, including a worthy fish and chips plate served with a big scoop of tangy red-and-green cabbage slaw. Lightly battered, the snow-white cod is often fried just ‘til blonde, and portions aren’t overwhelming, well-suited to such a hearty meal. Regulars swap out the fries for the excellent tots, or order one of the appealingly large salads topped with dried fruits and chopped vegetables. Diners can enjoy the view of the old train bridge across the river, or stroll over to the Umpqua Discovery Center next door for exhibits on the area’s history and geology.

The Boat

The Boat, Coos Bay, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

In 2017, Cassie Hamilton pulled up her converted floating houseboat restaurant from Winchester Bay and moved the operation to nearby Coos Bay. Dry-docked on northbound Highway 101, The Boat attracts flocks of locals for fried oysters and hand-cut halibut, as well as the more standard cod and shrimp fry. Slaw can be subbed for decent fries or added for an additional price. Outdoor deck seating overlooks cool vintage trains and logging equipment in the Oregon Coast Historic Railway train yard next door, especially pretty adorned with lights during the holidays.

The Boat, Coos Bay, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

The Crazy Norwegian’s Fish and Chips

Cod and chips, The Crazy Norwegian’s, Port Orford, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

It’s simply not a trip to the South Coast without a stop at Crazy’s, or so it’s been called by locals for decades, in Port Orford. Sometimes it seems a little crazy indeed, with big summertime lunch and dinner crowds clamoring for huge plates of well fried, crispy battered Alaskan cod with an unusual tarragon-flecked tartar sauce. Fortunately, one of the most beautiful views on the entire coast is a quick walk away, so owner Dianne Hosford advises savvy patrons to add their names to the list and come back after working up an appetite in the breezy hills overlooking the sandy cove of Battle Rock beach. After tourist season ends in October, the fish hut often has immediate seating, and constantly changing specials, including Port Orford rockfish and chips. One of the shop’s heaping slices of fruit pie isn’t a bad way to end a meal.

Cod and chips, The Crazy Norwegian’s, Port Orford, OR
Jennifer Burns Bright

Catalyst Seafood

The Goergen family has been fishing the Pacific since 1955, so it was a natural choice to name their first full-service restaurant after their fishing vessel Catalyst; for visitors to the far south of the Oregon coast, it’s the best bet for reliable local seafood. Occupying a low-slung building with a modest sign near the port in Harbor, inside is surprisingly intimate with dark walls and simple wood and nautical furnishings. Depending on what’s been landed, the fish and chips basket might contain firm and juicy albacore or flaky ling cod, always piled on top of slightly spicy, seasoned fries; a recent Captain Platter special contained batter-fried nuggets of ling cod cheeks, oysters and prawns, little popcorn scallops, and calamari strips with a mound of fries or a salad. It may not all be local, but it sure does hit the spot.

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