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A plate of burrata is surrounded by vegetables at a table at Portland’s Arden.
Burrata with green chickpea and ramp pesto, golden raisins, pine nuts and Korean watercress at Arden.
Molly J. Smith/Eater Portland

Tantalizing Tasting Menus and Prix Fixe Dinners in Portland

From three-course French dinners to experimental chef’s tastings

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Burrata with green chickpea and ramp pesto, golden raisins, pine nuts and Korean watercress at Arden.
| Molly J. Smith/Eater Portland

Often, the best way to sample a menu is to put yourself in the chef’s hands — and tasting menus and prix fixe dinners are a great way for chefs to show off their best work. The pandemic shut down many fine dining favorites — Beast, Holdfast, Tercet — and places like Berlu have shifted away from a tasting menu model. However, a good number of restaurants have returned in full force, with intricate tasting menus and omakase.

This list rounds up the finest fixed-price tasting menus in town, from the affordable like Bergerac to splurges like Nodoguro. Some locations offer a tasting menu in addition to an à la carte one; others only do set menus, and some offer choices within the prix fixe options. Although many pop-up dinners have fixed menus, this map only includes permanent establishments. Note that menus do change often, as do prices; it’s best to check reservation sites for pricing before booking, in case of minor price changes. For more celebration dinner spots, check out this map.

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Zilla Sake

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While many fine dining restaurants in Portland try to couch their seriousness with a party atmosphere, this small, quiet sake bar with neighborhood izakaya vibes exudes a focus and professionalism, allowing the food and drink to speak for themselves. Oregon-grown wasabi roots sit in a bowl of water, stems tangled; chefs swirl wasabi against a flat grater to form a light, delicate paste, served alongside nigiri from around the world. On any given visit, fourteen-day-aged sea bream may arrive with yuzu-Thai chile kosho and house soy sauce, providing a lovely floral note, while 21-day dry-aged Ora King salmon may appear with blood orange-serrano kosho, buttery with a satisfying sweetness and acidity from the citrus. If you’re lucky, you’ll finish with ribbons of rice noodle swirled among chanterelles in a yuzu-kosho compound butter — an elegant end to an unassuming, refined omakase. Reservations are available via Tock.

Gado Gado

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Just off Sandy in the Hollywood District, this Southeast Asian restaurant wrapped in shellfish-adorned wallpaper offers something the team calls its rice table, a play on the Dutch-Indonesian rijsttafel service. For $85 per person, a flurry of dishes like pickled beet panipuri, chicken satay in terasi peanut sauce, and Chinese sausage and shrimp shu mai precede a feast of curries, stews, and braises, covering the table with an accompanying bowl of chef Thomas Pisha-Duffly’s grandmother’s clove-scented rice. Highlights include the blistered tomato curry and flaky roti canai. Make a reservation on Resy.

Langbaan

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One of Portland’s hottest dinners, don’t expect to get a seat at Langbaan without some effort; regardless, it’s worth it. Located at a chef’s counter within owner Akkapong Earl Ninsom’s Northwest Portland Thai restaurant, Phuket Cafe, dishes here are complex and nuanced, without shying away from loud and profound flavors. Past menus included a pickled mussel salad with a satisfyingly bright acidity, tossed a thin dressing verdant green with mint, the crunch of lotus stem juxtaposed with charred fresh figs. A fermented fish curry has a lingering, delicate funk and sweetness, with a pristine piece of steamed halibut at its center. Menus shift periodically, but every meal starts with miang som, a betel-leaf-wrapped bite of plump shrimp and citrus, and kanom krok, a crispy rice cup filled with a pool of coconut-cream-coated scallops. Reservations are available on Resy. Menus start at $125.

Nodoguro

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The maximalist omakase adored by people like Questlove is back, and chef Ryan Roadhouse is scooping consomme gel into bowls of marinated Dungeness crab and fermented yuzu-compressed cucumber, or poaching firefly squid before tossing them in an effervescent egg yolk emulsion, or frying fresh figs in the style of agedashi tofu in Portland once again. Nodoguro dinners are an adventure, often involving more than 20 courses of both sushi and other Japanese-Pacific Northwestern dishes. Tasting menus are $250 per person; reservations can be tough to get, but we have more details here for you.

Han Oak

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Throughout the pandemic, Han Oak has shape-shifted, offering takeout meals, hosting pop-ups and brunches, and eventually settling into seasonal tasting menu service in its hidden gem of a restaurant. Behind a barely marked turquoise door, a courtyard reminiscent of a friend’s lawn opens onto a warm, bustling space, where servers drop glasses of Portuguese orange wine and Korean lemon-lime soda Chilsung at tables. Menus shift seasonally — Typically, in the colder months, Han Oak offers its hot pot service, meals beginning with marbled, thin slices of rib-eye, mushrooms, and other meats and vegetables, cooked shabu-shabu-style in a pot of house bone broth on a tableside hot plate. Currently, Han Oak is still throwing its “gimbap party,” in which a parade of banchan and corned beef soo yook open for a build-your-own rice wrap party, with fillings like koji-cured coppa, seared albacore, and an array of pickles and ferments. The full meal starts at $65; reservations are available via Resy.

Arden Restaurant Portland

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The family-style, four-course tasting menu at this striking Pearl District restaurant changes often, but with chef Erik Van Kley in the kitchen, any visit will likely dazzle. Past dinners have incorporated chanterelle mushroom and potato pierogi with ricotta and truffles, platters of duck with crepes and ‘nduja brown butter, and butter-poached halibut in a pool of beautiful harissa broth. The tasting menu is $70 with a $45 wine pairing; make a reservation via the website.

República

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This Pearl District tasting menu restaurant takes a foundation of Mexican ingredients, culinary techniques, and historical context to concoct dishes like sablefish in the style of pescado zarandeado, or salmon aguachile with black garlic and rhubarb. On a past visit, duck breast arrived over a duo of moles, incorporating apricots and squash and pistachio to bring out the wild gaminess, butteriness, and sweetness of the bird. Servers will often talk through the personal, creative, and historical lineage of each dish as it lands at the table, giving the overarching meal a sense of place and dimension. The meal is $129 for seven courses and $150 for 10, with reservations on Opentable.

Le Pigeon

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Gabe Rucker’s Le Pigeon has had no small influence in defining what constitutes Portland dining: playful and creative, boundary-pushing and nonchalant. A past dinner included watermelon ham with oolong-pickled quail egg, braised goat sopes with aji amarillo-pickled cucumbers and nectarines, and hamachi in a creamy dressing with cantaloupe popping boba; while the menu changes frequently, every non-vegetarian meal ends with Rucker’s foie gras profiteroles, the best ice cream sandwich a human could consume. The restaurant offers both meaty and vegetarian five-course menus each night starting at $135, with nonalcoholic and alcoholic beverage pairings as well as optional add-ons like foie gras. Reservations are available via Resy.

Mucca Osteria

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This Morrison Italian restaurant’s white tablecloths, sultry decor, and impeccable service makes it a favorite for romantic dinners and anniversaries. The menu here includes a lot of stalwarts, including a gorgeous seared scallop with saffron gel and shallot relish, as well as house-made pastas, like mushroom and ricotta-filled tortelli. The tasting menu is $95 plus gratuity; reservations are available at Resy. Note: Mucca is closed temporarily for renovations, but will reopen on December 1.

Nimblefish

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The omakase at this Hawthorne sushi counter is likely the city’s finest, from the first bite to the scoop of yuzu sorbet at the finish. Each piece of fish here gets so much love at every step of the process: Horse mackerel bathes in salt, sugar, and water, bringing out the natural sweetness of the fish. Salt-and-pepper-cured saba gets a cold smoke, with a clear arc in flavor. It’s worth it to spring for the add-ons toward the end of the meal, in particular the silky, beefy A5 wagyu. Reservations for the $85 omakase are available via Resy.

Jacqueline

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For a taste of the Pacific Northwest — both its vegetables and its seafood — this Southeast Clinton restaurant doesn’t miss. The meal starts with raw dishes like juniper-cured salmon with green tomatoes and hamachi crudo swimming in a shallow pool of mam nem, followed by salads that show off the best of the current season, be it tomatoes and peaches with burrata or pears, radicchio, and fennel with Roquefort. From there, meals can head in a variety of directions, finishing off with a bowl of clams, crispy-fried pork ribs, or anything in between. Meals are $90 each, served family style. Make a reservation on Resy.

Quaintrelle

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Tables through the long, narrow dining room at this Southeast Clinton restaurant support plates of bordelaise-accompanied rib-eyes and beef fat confit beets as wine pours into glasses and diners rip into focaccia. Longtime Portland fine dining vet Naomi Pomeroy consulted with the team at Quaintrelle, and the restaurant has entered an era of subtle elegance and seasonality. For instance, in the summer, chef Elijah G. Rivers paired corn-crescenza cappelletti with sweet Jimmy Nardello peppers, while a deep fall dish of miso butter buckwheat taglierini arrived topped with petals of matsutakes. Tastings start at $155; reservations are available on Opentable.

Lilia Comedor

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At this South Waterfront restaurant, chef Juan Gomez highlights Oregon produce, game, and seafood in intricate, creative moles, aguachiles, and masa creations. Menus change daily; past visits have involved ahi tuna in an electric serrano kiwi berry aguachile, butter-poached sunchoke with black garlic matsutake mole, and octopus tacos with salsa tatemada and pickled gooseberry; for dessert, expect anything from angular shards of blueberry meringue to huckleberry panna cotta with corn blondie crumble. Tastings are $98 per person, with reservations available on OpenTable.

Bergerac

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Walking into Bergerac, you’re hit with the smell of red wine, butter, and shallots, the clatters of glassware ringing among relaxed conversations at a handful of tables. This is straight-up French comfort food: escargot in garlic butter, pate with crostini and onion jam, and salt-cured duck confit, finished with standards like creme brulee and pot au chocolat. It’d be a mistake to miss the braised lamb, served over an earthy risotto-esque black rice brightened with an herby sauce. The two-course prix fixe is $50 and the three-course is $65; reservations are available on Tock.

Zilla Sake

While many fine dining restaurants in Portland try to couch their seriousness with a party atmosphere, this small, quiet sake bar with neighborhood izakaya vibes exudes a focus and professionalism, allowing the food and drink to speak for themselves. Oregon-grown wasabi roots sit in a bowl of water, stems tangled; chefs swirl wasabi against a flat grater to form a light, delicate paste, served alongside nigiri from around the world. On any given visit, fourteen-day-aged sea bream may arrive with yuzu-Thai chile kosho and house soy sauce, providing a lovely floral note, while 21-day dry-aged Ora King salmon may appear with blood orange-serrano kosho, buttery with a satisfying sweetness and acidity from the citrus. If you’re lucky, you’ll finish with ribbons of rice noodle swirled among chanterelles in a yuzu-kosho compound butter — an elegant end to an unassuming, refined omakase. Reservations are available via Tock.

Gado Gado

Just off Sandy in the Hollywood District, this Southeast Asian restaurant wrapped in shellfish-adorned wallpaper offers something the team calls its rice table, a play on the Dutch-Indonesian rijsttafel service. For $85 per person, a flurry of dishes like pickled beet panipuri, chicken satay in terasi peanut sauce, and Chinese sausage and shrimp shu mai precede a feast of curries, stews, and braises, covering the table with an accompanying bowl of chef Thomas Pisha-Duffly’s grandmother’s clove-scented rice. Highlights include the blistered tomato curry and flaky roti canai. Make a reservation on Resy.

Langbaan

One of Portland’s hottest dinners, don’t expect to get a seat at Langbaan without some effort; regardless, it’s worth it. Located at a chef’s counter within owner Akkapong Earl Ninsom’s Northwest Portland Thai restaurant, Phuket Cafe, dishes here are complex and nuanced, without shying away from loud and profound flavors. Past menus included a pickled mussel salad with a satisfyingly bright acidity, tossed a thin dressing verdant green with mint, the crunch of lotus stem juxtaposed with charred fresh figs. A fermented fish curry has a lingering, delicate funk and sweetness, with a pristine piece of steamed halibut at its center. Menus shift periodically, but every meal starts with miang som, a betel-leaf-wrapped bite of plump shrimp and citrus, and kanom krok, a crispy rice cup filled with a pool of coconut-cream-coated scallops. Reservations are available on Resy. Menus start at $125.

Nodoguro

The maximalist omakase adored by people like Questlove is back, and chef Ryan Roadhouse is scooping consomme gel into bowls of marinated Dungeness crab and fermented yuzu-compressed cucumber, or poaching firefly squid before tossing them in an effervescent egg yolk emulsion, or frying fresh figs in the style of agedashi tofu in Portland once again. Nodoguro dinners are an adventure, often involving more than 20 courses of both sushi and other Japanese-Pacific Northwestern dishes. Tasting menus are $250 per person; reservations can be tough to get, but we have more details here for you.

Han Oak

Throughout the pandemic, Han Oak has shape-shifted, offering takeout meals, hosting pop-ups and brunches, and eventually settling into seasonal tasting menu service in its hidden gem of a restaurant. Behind a barely marked turquoise door, a courtyard reminiscent of a friend’s lawn opens onto a warm, bustling space, where servers drop glasses of Portuguese orange wine and Korean lemon-lime soda Chilsung at tables. Menus shift seasonally — Typically, in the colder months, Han Oak offers its hot pot service, meals beginning with marbled, thin slices of rib-eye, mushrooms, and other meats and vegetables, cooked shabu-shabu-style in a pot of house bone broth on a tableside hot plate. Currently, Han Oak is still throwing its “gimbap party,” in which a parade of banchan and corned beef soo yook open for a build-your-own rice wrap party, with fillings like koji-cured coppa, seared albacore, and an array of pickles and ferments. The full meal starts at $65; reservations are available via Resy.

Arden Restaurant Portland

The family-style, four-course tasting menu at this striking Pearl District restaurant changes often, but with chef Erik Van Kley in the kitchen, any visit will likely dazzle. Past dinners have incorporated chanterelle mushroom and potato pierogi with ricotta and truffles, platters of duck with crepes and ‘nduja brown butter, and butter-poached halibut in a pool of beautiful harissa broth. The tasting menu is $70 with a $45 wine pairing; make a reservation via the website.

República

This Pearl District tasting menu restaurant takes a foundation of Mexican ingredients, culinary techniques, and historical context to concoct dishes like sablefish in the style of pescado zarandeado, or salmon aguachile with black garlic and rhubarb. On a past visit, duck breast arrived over a duo of moles, incorporating apricots and squash and pistachio to bring out the wild gaminess, butteriness, and sweetness of the bird. Servers will often talk through the personal, creative, and historical lineage of each dish as it lands at the table, giving the overarching meal a sense of place and dimension. The meal is $129 for seven courses and $150 for 10, with reservations on Opentable.

Le Pigeon

Gabe Rucker’s Le Pigeon has had no small influence in defining what constitutes Portland dining: playful and creative, boundary-pushing and nonchalant. A past dinner included watermelon ham with oolong-pickled quail egg, braised goat sopes with aji amarillo-pickled cucumbers and nectarines, and hamachi in a creamy dressing with cantaloupe popping boba; while the menu changes frequently, every non-vegetarian meal ends with Rucker’s foie gras profiteroles, the best ice cream sandwich a human could consume. The restaurant offers both meaty and vegetarian five-course menus each night starting at $135, with nonalcoholic and alcoholic beverage pairings as well as optional add-ons like foie gras. Reservations are available via Resy.

Mucca Osteria

This Morrison Italian restaurant’s white tablecloths, sultry decor, and impeccable service makes it a favorite for romantic dinners and anniversaries. The menu here includes a lot of stalwarts, including a gorgeous seared scallop with saffron gel and shallot relish, as well as house-made pastas, like mushroom and ricotta-filled tortelli. The tasting menu is $95 plus gratuity; reservations are available at Resy. Note: Mucca is closed temporarily for renovations, but will reopen on December 1.

Nimblefish

The omakase at this Hawthorne sushi counter is likely the city’s finest, from the first bite to the scoop of yuzu sorbet at the finish. Each piece of fish here gets so much love at every step of the process: Horse mackerel bathes in salt, sugar, and water, bringing out the natural sweetness of the fish. Salt-and-pepper-cured saba gets a cold smoke, with a clear arc in flavor. It’s worth it to spring for the add-ons toward the end of the meal, in particular the silky, beefy A5 wagyu. Reservations for the $85 omakase are available via Resy.

Jacqueline

For a taste of the Pacific Northwest — both its vegetables and its seafood — this Southeast Clinton restaurant doesn’t miss. The meal starts with raw dishes like juniper-cured salmon with green tomatoes and hamachi crudo swimming in a shallow pool of mam nem, followed by salads that show off the best of the current season, be it tomatoes and peaches with burrata or pears, radicchio, and fennel with Roquefort. From there, meals can head in a variety of directions, finishing off with a bowl of clams, crispy-fried pork ribs, or anything in between. Meals are $90 each, served family style. Make a reservation on Resy.

Quaintrelle

Tables through the long, narrow dining room at this Southeast Clinton restaurant support plates of bordelaise-accompanied rib-eyes and beef fat confit beets as wine pours into glasses and diners rip into focaccia. Longtime Portland fine dining vet Naomi Pomeroy consulted with the team at Quaintrelle, and the restaurant has entered an era of subtle elegance and seasonality. For instance, in the summer, chef Elijah G. Rivers paired corn-crescenza cappelletti with sweet Jimmy Nardello peppers, while a deep fall dish of miso butter buckwheat taglierini arrived topped with petals of matsutakes. Tastings start at $155; reservations are available on Opentable.

Lilia Comedor

At this South Waterfront restaurant, chef Juan Gomez highlights Oregon produce, game, and seafood in intricate, creative moles, aguachiles, and masa creations. Menus change daily; past visits have involved ahi tuna in an electric serrano kiwi berry aguachile, butter-poached sunchoke with black garlic matsutake mole, and octopus tacos with salsa tatemada and pickled gooseberry; for dessert, expect anything from angular shards of blueberry meringue to huckleberry panna cotta with corn blondie crumble. Tastings are $98 per person, with reservations available on OpenTable.

Bergerac

Walking into Bergerac, you’re hit with the smell of red wine, butter, and shallots, the clatters of glassware ringing among relaxed conversations at a handful of tables. This is straight-up French comfort food: escargot in garlic butter, pate with crostini and onion jam, and salt-cured duck confit, finished with standards like creme brulee and pot au chocolat. It’d be a mistake to miss the braised lamb, served over an earthy risotto-esque black rice brightened with an herby sauce. The two-course prix fixe is $50 and the three-course is $65; reservations are available on Tock.

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