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A hand holds a mug of orange-brown tea over a floral-looking pile of loose-leaf tea
Smith Teamaker tea
Alan Weiner

Where to Sip Soothing Teas in Portland

Find Portland's best teahouses and tea shops

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Smith Teamaker tea
| Alan Weiner

Rainy Portland has long had a reputation of a coffee town, but lately the city's love affair with tea is as hot and steamy as a freshly brewed pot of oolong. These tea shops go beyond the basic bag of English Breakfast — many of these shops are making their own blends, offering gaiwan or high tea service.

The map features tea houses both traditional and cutting-edge, as well as the opportunity to sip teas in a Portland’s beloved Lan Su Chinese garden. Other tea shops below provide live music, Tarot readings, tea-infused cocktails, and tea tasting flights. Not every given cafe or restaurant pouring tea appears on this map; every spot here has a very obvious focus on tea, with food or coffee playing a supporting role (if available at all). Find some of Portland’s finest places to drink tea on the map below. For those seeking coffee, our cafe and roaster maps should be a better fit; bubble tea can be found on the Eater Portland boba map. Per usual, this map is not ranked — it’s organized geographically.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Lovejoy's Tea Room of Portland

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Bright, warm, and eclectically furnished, Lovejoy’s may only be two years old, but it feels like time traveling to old Portland. Not quite traditional English-style tea service is the main attraction here, and the in-house crumpets have become sufficiently beloved to justify their own spin-off company, The Crumpany. The tea menu is heavy on black teas, but the white, green, pu’erh, and herbal options are all carefully sourced. Indoor sipping only for those with proof of vaccination.

Fly Awake Tea Garden

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Fly Awake bills itself as something of a “secret” tea speakeasy (a “teakeasy”?) but isn’t all that hard to locate. Around the alley corner from local sex shop SheBop, Fly Awake resembles the garage of a very cool friend who’s not quite finished converting it into a home bar. The menu is small but mighty, with stellar black, oolong, and pu’erh selections. Find bulk batches of house-made chai, as well as chai concentrates, which you can mellow at home with milk. Additional menu items include samosas, house-made dal, and $20 Tarot readings.

Smith Teamaker

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Smith Teamaker is one of the most renowned teamaking companies in America, and its newest tasting room in Northwest Portland reflects the late Steven Smith’s relentless drive to introduce a wider audience to quality tea. The light green interior creates the impression of being inside a hot cup of green tea, which isn’t necessarily a bad sensation on a typically dreary Portland afternoon. Tea options include a handful of distinctive choices in each major category, as well as tea lattes, gaiwan service, and tea flights. Chef Karl Holl’s food menu incorporates tea thoughtfully into about half the dishes, a highlight being the “Smith Bowl” featuring sencha-infused quinoa.

Tower of Cosmic Reflections

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If you're looking to be transported, the teahouse operated by Tao of Tea inside of the lush Lan Su Chinese Garden is hard to beat. Sip teas within a traditional Chinese teahouse overlooking a reflecting pool, surrounded by beautiful gardens. Tea options are limited to a handful of popular favorites like jasmine pearl, white peony, and sen-matcha. Food ranges from inexpensive snacks like pumpkin seeds and roasted fava beans to hot dumplings and steamed buns. Note that you have to pay admission to the garden to access the teahouse.

Behind The Museum Café

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Food and beverage options within a few blocks of popular tourist destinations like the Portland Art Museum can often be overpriced bland mediocrities. Despite the utilitarian name, Behind the Museum is a gem. Light classical music wafts by, and massive windows wrap tea sippers in light as they lean over hot cups of Japanese teas like vibrant sencha, brown rice genmaicha, or finely ground matcha. Onigiri and miso soup are stars of the light food menu. A full assortment of espresso drinks are available for companions who prefer ground beans to steeped leaves. Open for indoor sipping.

Tao of Tea

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Adjoining storefronts, the Tao of Tea includes both a shop for purchasing loose leaf tea and fine pottery pots, and a tranquil tea house of the same name, offering those same teas in simple-but-elegant tea service. The décor is heavy on raw materials, from bamboo to stone, and knowledgeable servers will regale patrons with their deep knowledge of each tea’s origins. Light food options include spinach rolls, which come with condiments like toasted coconut, lime, and mango chutney.

Tea Bar

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Tea Bar was inspired by owner Erica Indira Swanson’s college years in Beijing, but the sleek, spare design and atmosphere is Seattle-Scandinavian. While high-quality loose leaf steeped teas are available, the priority here are boba milk teas and creative tea lattes, like the cardamom chai latte and the bee pollen matcha latte. Milk choices include dairy, gluten-free oat, coconut, and almond. The Southwest and NE Killingsworth locations are temporarily shuttered; SE Division and Pearl District locations are open for both indoor sipping and takeout.

Enthea Teahouse

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Serious tea nerds, this is your oasis. Enthea pours more than 150 loose leaf teas, personally sourced by owner Steve Odell directly from tea farmers Odell befriended on frequent trips to China. Customers remove their shoes upon entering this century-old Victorian house, and servers expertly rhapsodize about each leaf in the hushed tones of librarians. Enthea sells a range of gorgeous tea ware — both traditional Chinese pottery as well as locally crafted pots, cups, and strainers. There are some light food options available, but this isn’t the spot to come hungry.

Mamancy Tea & Chocolate

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Mamancy in Beaverton makes it clear that coffee has been hogging the dance floor with chocolate for far too long. Schedule a high tea with friends, including omnivore, vegan, or gluten-free versions, or sip on a black, green, roiboos, or herbal tea curated to be a perfect match with one of the chocolate truffles on offer. Owner Anne Johnson donates 10 percent of profits to a children’s charity in her native Kenya. Mamancy is open for indoor dining and noshing in its bright, welcoming space.

Aesthete Tea Teahouse

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Nestled in the brightly colored “French Quarter” in Multnomah Village is the hyper-minimalist Aesthete Tea Teahouse. True to its name, Aesthete serves tea from black pots into white cups, as patrons sit on spare but comfortable black chairs around small, simple white tables. The tea specialties here are creative house blends like chamomile-coconut Moonlight, Assam-and-orange-oil Amber Dawn, or the herbal medley Sexual Healing. Aesthete energetically pushes past the conventional, hosting events like free yoga on the solstice, and carrying an unexpected assortment of products, including pacifiers, soap, and personal lubricants.

Tea Chai Té

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It’s hard to top the cozy charm of Tea Chai Té’s original Nob Hill location inside an organically labyrinthine Victorian house, but the Sellwood location — built in and around an honest-to-goodness railroad caboose — just might do it. Year-round Christmas lights and a few of grandma’s couches amplify the ramshackle charm, but the tea selection is anything but shallow. Tea Chai Té steeps and pours more than 120 teas, from well-known Chinese and Japanese green teas to the harder-to-find Amazonian guayusa leaf tea. Though temporarily paused for the pandemic, the sniffing jars of each tea are a delightful highlight.

Cup of Tea

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In an unassuming suburban shopping center surrounded by a nail salon, a Domino’s pizza, and a Jersey Mike’s sits one of the region’s very best tea shops. The inviting décor is dark wood and leather with a small (artificial) tree inside, giving the shop a splash of organic energy. Sip on over 150 loose-leaf teas, subscribe to a tea of the month club with a percentage going to local charities, or shop for tea sets for your next tea party. Open for indoor sipping or takeout.

Lovejoy's Tea Room of Portland

Bright, warm, and eclectically furnished, Lovejoy’s may only be two years old, but it feels like time traveling to old Portland. Not quite traditional English-style tea service is the main attraction here, and the in-house crumpets have become sufficiently beloved to justify their own spin-off company, The Crumpany. The tea menu is heavy on black teas, but the white, green, pu’erh, and herbal options are all carefully sourced. Indoor sipping only for those with proof of vaccination.

Fly Awake Tea Garden

Fly Awake bills itself as something of a “secret” tea speakeasy (a “teakeasy”?) but isn’t all that hard to locate. Around the alley corner from local sex shop SheBop, Fly Awake resembles the garage of a very cool friend who’s not quite finished converting it into a home bar. The menu is small but mighty, with stellar black, oolong, and pu’erh selections. Find bulk batches of house-made chai, as well as chai concentrates, which you can mellow at home with milk. Additional menu items include samosas, house-made dal, and $20 Tarot readings.

Smith Teamaker

Smith Teamaker is one of the most renowned teamaking companies in America, and its newest tasting room in Northwest Portland reflects the late Steven Smith’s relentless drive to introduce a wider audience to quality tea. The light green interior creates the impression of being inside a hot cup of green tea, which isn’t necessarily a bad sensation on a typically dreary Portland afternoon. Tea options include a handful of distinctive choices in each major category, as well as tea lattes, gaiwan service, and tea flights. Chef Karl Holl’s food menu incorporates tea thoughtfully into about half the dishes, a highlight being the “Smith Bowl” featuring sencha-infused quinoa.

Tower of Cosmic Reflections

If you're looking to be transported, the teahouse operated by Tao of Tea inside of the lush Lan Su Chinese Garden is hard to beat. Sip teas within a traditional Chinese teahouse overlooking a reflecting pool, surrounded by beautiful gardens. Tea options are limited to a handful of popular favorites like jasmine pearl, white peony, and sen-matcha. Food ranges from inexpensive snacks like pumpkin seeds and roasted fava beans to hot dumplings and steamed buns. Note that you have to pay admission to the garden to access the teahouse.

Behind The Museum Café

Food and beverage options within a few blocks of popular tourist destinations like the Portland Art Museum can often be overpriced bland mediocrities. Despite the utilitarian name, Behind the Museum is a gem. Light classical music wafts by, and massive windows wrap tea sippers in light as they lean over hot cups of Japanese teas like vibrant sencha, brown rice genmaicha, or finely ground matcha. Onigiri and miso soup are stars of the light food menu. A full assortment of espresso drinks are available for companions who prefer ground beans to steeped leaves. Open for indoor sipping.

Tao of Tea

Adjoining storefronts, the Tao of Tea includes both a shop for purchasing loose leaf tea and fine pottery pots, and a tranquil tea house of the same name, offering those same teas in simple-but-elegant tea service. The décor is heavy on raw materials, from bamboo to stone, and knowledgeable servers will regale patrons with their deep knowledge of each tea’s origins. Light food options include spinach rolls, which come with condiments like toasted coconut, lime, and mango chutney.

Tea Bar

Tea Bar was inspired by owner Erica Indira Swanson’s college years in Beijing, but the sleek, spare design and atmosphere is Seattle-Scandinavian. While high-quality loose leaf steeped teas are available, the priority here are boba milk teas and creative tea lattes, like the cardamom chai latte and the bee pollen matcha latte. Milk choices include dairy, gluten-free oat, coconut, and almond. The Southwest and NE Killingsworth locations are temporarily shuttered; SE Division and Pearl District locations are open for both indoor sipping and takeout.

Enthea Teahouse

Serious tea nerds, this is your oasis. Enthea pours more than 150 loose leaf teas, personally sourced by owner Steve Odell directly from tea farmers Odell befriended on frequent trips to China. Customers remove their shoes upon entering this century-old Victorian house, and servers expertly rhapsodize about each leaf in the hushed tones of librarians. Enthea sells a range of gorgeous tea ware — both traditional Chinese pottery as well as locally crafted pots, cups, and strainers. There are some light food options available, but this isn’t the spot to come hungry.

Mamancy Tea & Chocolate

Mamancy in Beaverton makes it clear that coffee has been hogging the dance floor with chocolate for far too long. Schedule a high tea with friends, including omnivore, vegan, or gluten-free versions, or sip on a black, green, roiboos, or herbal tea curated to be a perfect match with one of the chocolate truffles on offer. Owner Anne Johnson donates 10 percent of profits to a children’s charity in her native Kenya. Mamancy is open for indoor dining and noshing in its bright, welcoming space.

Aesthete Tea Teahouse

Nestled in the brightly colored “French Quarter” in Multnomah Village is the hyper-minimalist Aesthete Tea Teahouse. True to its name, Aesthete serves tea from black pots into white cups, as patrons sit on spare but comfortable black chairs around small, simple white tables. The tea specialties here are creative house blends like chamomile-coconut Moonlight, Assam-and-orange-oil Amber Dawn, or the herbal medley Sexual Healing. Aesthete energetically pushes past the conventional, hosting events like free yoga on the solstice, and carrying an unexpected assortment of products, including pacifiers, soap, and personal lubricants.

Tea Chai Té

It’s hard to top the cozy charm of Tea Chai Té’s original Nob Hill location inside an organically labyrinthine Victorian house, but the Sellwood location — built in and around an honest-to-goodness railroad caboose — just might do it. Year-round Christmas lights and a few of grandma’s couches amplify the ramshackle charm, but the tea selection is anything but shallow. Tea Chai Té steeps and pours more than 120 teas, from well-known Chinese and Japanese green teas to the harder-to-find Amazonian guayusa leaf tea. Though temporarily paused for the pandemic, the sniffing jars of each tea are a delightful highlight.

Cup of Tea

In an unassuming suburban shopping center surrounded by a nail salon, a Domino’s pizza, and a Jersey Mike’s sits one of the region’s very best tea shops. The inviting décor is dark wood and leather with a small (artificial) tree inside, giving the shop a splash of organic energy. Sip on over 150 loose-leaf teas, subscribe to a tea of the month club with a percentage going to local charities, or shop for tea sets for your next tea party. Open for indoor sipping or takeout.

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