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A picture of the clam chowder at Ox, which comes with a roasted marrow bone
Clam chowder with a smoked marrow bone at Ox.
Dina Avila/Eater Portland

Iconic Portland Dishes That Are Actually Worth Eating

Whether you’re visiting or just looking for the hits, find the city's most famous plates

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Clam chowder with a smoked marrow bone at Ox.
| Dina Avila/Eater Portland

If restaurants have the ability to achieve something like cult status, it’s often as a result of one iconic dish that’s influenced the local culinary scene. However, those dishes are not always winners — ask any Portlander the last time they went out and bought themselves a bacon maple bar, for instance.

Over the years, iconic plates have come and gone, but many are permanent fixtures. This map honors these stalwarts of Portland dining that are actually worth tracking down — those dishes that, were they to be removed from menus, would cause a citywide revolt. For this map, our icons are not only dishes that are famous; they’re dishes that are delicious, and emblematic of Portland dining. From foie gras profiteroles to pizzas topped with tatsoi, many of the dishes that define Portland’s food scene celebrate some of the best parts of living here — local produce, artistic honesty, and plain-old playfulness. They tell stories of the people who live here: The cultural capital of a relatively young state, Portland is a city of immigrants and expats, bringing culinary traditions from Vietnam, Guyana, and everywhere in between. Below, find the dishes that define us.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process. If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Fried chicken combo at Hat Yai

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Chef Akkapong Earl Ninsom is by all accounts crushing Thai food in Portland, and that includes fried chicken. Hat Yai's star dish, the fried chicken leg quarter, Malayu-style curry, and roti combo, provides the best of all worlds: crispy chicken and pan-fried bread with rich and spicy curry for dipping. And note: dipping should be mandatory.

Expatriate nachos at Expatriate

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It would be hard to name a more distinctive plate of Portland nachos than the version at Expatriate: Wonton chips arrive in a gooey Thai chile cheese sauce, with lemongrass-scented beef and makrut lime-tomato salsa. They have that nice balance of smart twists with all the messy, unfussy charm of bar nachos — Portland bar food in a nutshell.

Pizza at Lovely's Fifty Fifty

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This is a bit of a cop-out, considering the pizzas change at Lovely’s Fifty-Fifty from week to week. However, the North Portland restaurant’s distinctive char, use of hyper-seasonal and rare vegetables, and thick sourdough crust made with Oregon grain flours give it a look that is unique to the Mississippi Pizzeria — even when the toppings change. If there is such a thing as “Portland-style pizza,” Lovely’s Fifty-Fifty is the place creating it.

White curry with brisket burnt ends at Eem

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When this hardcore collaboration between Akkapong Earl Ninsom (Hat Yai, Langbaan), Matt Vicedomini (Matt’s BBQ), and Eric Nelson (Shipwreck) opened on North Williams, the brisket burnt end curry became the fan favorite quickly, a perfect encapsulation of the restaurant’s schtick: Chunks of smoked fatty brisket bathe in Golden Mountain, white vinegar, and sugar before landing in a subtly spiced white curry. The combination makes for a sweet, aromatic-heavy dish ideally paired with any of the restaurant’s maximalist cocktails (or mocktails).

Doughnuts and chai at Pip's Original Doughnuts & Chai

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Yes, tourists love to talk about Voodoo Doughnut and its outlandish fried creations, but Pip’s is a local favorite for piping hot, freshly fried doughnuts, simply adorned with a drizzle of honey or a coating of cinnamon sugar. Paired with a cup of house chai, it’s extremely hard to beat — especially on your birthday, when a dozen mini-doughnuts are free.

Teriyaki chicken at Du's Grill

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Name-dropped by the rapper Aminé and once called the “best Korean teriyaki in the known universe,” a plate of char-blistered, juicy chicken drenched in sweet teriyaki, served with a scoop of rice and a poppyseed-dressed salad, is a rite of passage for those who grew up in Portland. The menu has a few other options — yakisoba, a tofu bowl — but when you’re at Du’s, you’re in it for the chicken.

Smoked bone marrow clam chowder at Ox

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It’s perhaps a little odd that the most famous dish from this Northeast Portland Latin American steakhouse is neither Latin American nor a steak, but the clam chowder with a smoked, jalapeño-dotted marrow bone at Ox remains not only a bucket list order at the restaurant, but in the city. Now that Portland’s bone marrow luge fever and Paley’s Place escargot with marrow bones are things of the past, Ox is one of the last bastions of bone marrow love in town, and the restaurant’s chowder remains shockingly delicate considering the sum of its parts.

Miang som and kanom krok at Langbaan

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This supper club within Northwest Portland’s Phuket Cafe changes its menu monthly, but a few snacks never seem to leave the menu: the miang som, a betel leaf filled with jewels of cara cara orange and shrimp, as well as the kanom krok, a sweet Hokkaido scallop dressed with coconut cream in a crispy rice cup. Both are perfect little bites, frequently discussed and treasured, when people talk about their meals at one of the city’s finest tasting menu spots.

Aerated Camembert from Heavenly Creatures

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File this map point under “new icons”: This Northeast Broadway wine bar has two different dishes that could have landed on this map, between the yellowtail-tonnato toast and this take on a cheese course. However, the latter is truly inventive, and captures the whimsical culinary voice of the city. High brow-low brow is basically a Portland cliche at this point, and this fussy take on Cheez Whiz certainly fits the bill in an ultra-fun way. Eat it alongside a glass of Oregon-made wine.

Fried chicken melt at Jojo

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This legendary fried chicken sandwich destination known for its Instagram has opened a full-on restaurant in the Pearl District, serving its likely most-photographed sandwich: crispy-fried thighs smashed between shokupan with coleslaw, ranch, and both cheddar and American. There are plenty of fantastic sandwiches at Jojo — the spicy chicken comes to mind — but when it comes to something distinct to the brand, a cross-section of this gorgeous sandwich (and a side of massive jojos) is hard to top. The cart has reopened as well, so you can get that sandwich at either location.

Oregon croissant at Ken's Artisan Bakery

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Ken’s Artisan Bakery is a pastry destination for a reason, but when it comes to the dish that is characteristic of the state, it’s hard to beat the Oregon Croissant. A melange of marionberry and hazelnut cream — two Oregon icons in their own right — the croissant uses a flavorful Pacific Northwestern flour for an added nuttiness. It’s a combination of Portland tropes: local fruit and exceptional baked goods.

Onion rings at Ringside Steakhouse

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Ringside Steakhouse’s onion rings are the things of local legend. Renowned local gourmand James Beard called the onion rings the finest he had ever eaten in the United States: wide, lightly battered rings served with a gravy boat of thousand island. For a luxe upgrade, the rings are particularly tasty when dunked in a side of house bearnaise.

Foie gras profiteroles at Le Pigeon

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Some might lobby for the beef cheek bourguignon at Gabriel Rucker's Burnside bistro, but this savory-leaning dessert, on the menu from the very beginning, is a better representation of the what has made the restaurant famous: It's playful, experimental, rich, and mind-blowing. There’s a reason these foie gras ice cream sandwiches, finished with drizzle of caramel and salt, have never left the menu.

Steam burgers at Canard

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When the casual counterpart to the lauded Le Pigeon opened, its tiny steam burgers were the obvious breakaway hit. Sure, the duck gravy-smothered pancakes and foie gras dumplings developed their devotees, but the simple steam burgers — bolstered with French onion soup flavors in the patty, blanketed in melty American — steal the show. It’s one of those classic Portland high-low deals: sitting in a beautiful brasserie-esque dining room, sipping a glass of orange wine, and inhaling a pile of impeccably executed mini-burgers.

Soft serve with a cowboy hat at Cheese & Crack

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Ten years ago, Salt & Straw was likely the most commonly spotted Portland ice cream on Instagram, but now, as Salt & Straw shops open all over the country, Portlanders are far more inclined to share shots of this cheese shop’s lanky towers of soft serve, dusted in various flavor powders and topped with a picture-perfect chocolate cowboy hat. They’re not just pretty, either: The ice cream itself is supremely rich and silky, and the dollop of chocolate ganache at the bottom of the cone is a thoughtful touch.

Nong's Khao Man Gai

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From a food cart, an obsession is born. Nong Poonsukwattana started out making one thing meticulously, and in the process she turned a Thai comfort food staple into Portland’s comfort food staple. Since then, her famous khao man gai has spawned two permanent restaurants, a bottled sauce, and deep, visceral craving among everyone who tries it.

Fried brie sticks at Scotch Lodge

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The fried brie at this sultry, subterranean cocktail bar and restaurant in Southeast Portland is another prime example of high-brow, low-brow. Sticks of brie get rolled in pumpernickel crumbs before hitting a fryer, finished with a swirl of verjus and a sprinkle of pistachios. They eat like fancy mozzarella sticks, with a more satisfying crunch and gooey center.

Steamed bao burger at Toki

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Portland is famous for many a burger, from the smashed patties at Mid City to the peanut butter-pickle-bacon monstrosity at Killer Burger; however, in terms of sheer innovation, the burger at this downtown Portland Korean(ish) restaurant receives top marks. The dry-aged patty, American cheese, white onion, and special sauce is fully encased in bao dough, finished on a griddle for a touch of crunch on the outside. Its brunch-y sibling — which swaps the beef for bacon, egg, cheese, and garlic aioli — gets an honorary mention here, as well.

Charcuterie plate at Olympia Provisions

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House-made charcuterie is ubiquitous on Portland menus, thanks in part to the astronomic rise of Olympia Provisions and its USDA-certified curing facility, which is now distributing its sopressatas, chorizos, and saucissons nationwide. At its flagship Southeast Portland restaurant, the charcuterie board could feature a wide range of products, from mortadella to salami to head cheese terrine, depending on the chef's whims of the day.

View this post on Instagram

feed me charcuterie boards all day, every day

A post shared by Jenny Hong (@jennyhongg) on

Insalata Nostrana at Nostrana

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Before chicory Caesars were ubiquitous at Italian restaurants, chef Cathy Whims’s simple radicchio salad became one of the city’s most famous, replicated by food bloggers and recipe developers around the country. The bitterness of the chicory is balanced by a satisfyingly Parmigiano-cheesy dressing, with savory herbs like rosemary and sage balancing the acidity of the vinegar in the dressing. It’s best paired with the gnocchi in Marcella Hazan’s tomato-butter sauce, if available.

Herring Under a Fur Coat at Kachka

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Pretty much out of the gate, Kachka became an icon for kicking off the Portland Russian food revolution. And this terrine, sort of Ruskie-style seven-layer-dip, is responsible for turning a city onto pickled herring. Its gorgeous gradient and triumphant plating make it a commonly photographed dish, with an elegant flavor on the palate.

Bakes from Bake on the Run

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As one of the only food businesses in the country that offers Guyanese cuisine, Bake on the Run’s puffy, stuffed breads — known as “bakes” — have become some the most distinctive food cart dishes available in the city. Here, they arrive filled with salt cod, chana aloo, or even Nutella, best paired with a beer from the nearby Fracture Brewing or a milkshake from neighboring cart Speed-o Cappuccino.

A photo of a vegan bake stuffed with chana aloo curry from Bake on the Run food cart
Chana aloo bake from Bake on the Run.
Bake on the Run

Chicken and jojos at Reel M Inn

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Eating fried chicken and thick-cut potato jojos is a sacred ritual in Portland, whether you’re getting them at Sadie Mae’s, Jojo, or Alberta Market (aka Jack’s). But often, when Portlanders talk about chicken and jojos, one name comes to mind: Reel M Inn, also known as the Reel, is a true Portland institution, standing in one form or another for 50 years. Sure, big-deal chefs and writers have praised the colorful dive for ages, but it’s also treasured by locals, who happily spend an evening playing pool, knocking back shots of whiskey, and dunking crispy hunks of potato and chicken into ranch and Frank’s hot sauce.

Mom’s Crab Fat Noodles at Magna

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One of the OG dishes on the menu of this Southeast Clinton Filipino restaurant, Magna’s crab fat noodles strike that balance of nostalgic cooking and Portland realness. For this dish, a nod to a pasta made by chef Carlo Lamagna’s mother, house-made squid ink noodles arrive tossed in a rich, luscious crab sauce, which gets its brightness from a combination of corn, peppers, and pickled vegetables. What’s more Oregonian than Dungeness crab and seasonal pickles?

A spoon served with a tangle of crab fat noodles, a squid ink spaghetti dish with a crab fat sauce, at Magna in Portland, Oregon.
Crab fat noodles at Magna.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

Cao lau at Rose VL Deli

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The soups change daily at this cheery Vietnamese spot, but on Saturdays, the deli crafts a somewhat dry noodle dish that’s almost impossible to find in American restaurants. Thick noodles sit in a bath of aromatic, sweet broth — they should sit for another two minutes once they arrive at the table — before they’re tossed with peanuts, pork, crackers, and an assortment of herbs and greens; the side of core-warming stock is for you to sip separately. Its intricate, careful construction and depth has made it a Saturday tradition throughout Portland.

Totchos at Oaks Bottom Public House

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In 1953, F. Nephi Grigg of potato brand Ore-Ida invented the tater tot as a way reduce waste from fry production. The “Ore” in “Ore-Ida” is, of course, Oregon, where the company was founded; the totcho, then, is a particularly Oregonian invention, a tater tot nacho first developed at this Sellwood - Moreland pub. A cross-section of two quintessential bar snacks, the totcho has solidified its spot as Portland drinking food royalty.

Fried chicken combo at Hat Yai

Chef Akkapong Earl Ninsom is by all accounts crushing Thai food in Portland, and that includes fried chicken. Hat Yai's star dish, the fried chicken leg quarter, Malayu-style curry, and roti combo, provides the best of all worlds: crispy chicken and pan-fried bread with rich and spicy curry for dipping. And note: dipping should be mandatory.

Expatriate nachos at Expatriate

It would be hard to name a more distinctive plate of Portland nachos than the version at Expatriate: Wonton chips arrive in a gooey Thai chile cheese sauce, with lemongrass-scented beef and makrut lime-tomato salsa. They have that nice balance of smart twists with all the messy, unfussy charm of bar nachos — Portland bar food in a nutshell.

Pizza at Lovely's Fifty Fifty

This is a bit of a cop-out, considering the pizzas change at Lovely’s Fifty-Fifty from week to week. However, the North Portland restaurant’s distinctive char, use of hyper-seasonal and rare vegetables, and thick sourdough crust made with Oregon grain flours give it a look that is unique to the Mississippi Pizzeria — even when the toppings change. If there is such a thing as “Portland-style pizza,” Lovely’s Fifty-Fifty is the place creating it.

White curry with brisket burnt ends at Eem

When this hardcore collaboration between Akkapong Earl Ninsom (Hat Yai, Langbaan), Matt Vicedomini (Matt’s BBQ), and Eric Nelson (Shipwreck) opened on North Williams, the brisket burnt end curry became the fan favorite quickly, a perfect encapsulation of the restaurant’s schtick: Chunks of smoked fatty brisket bathe in Golden Mountain, white vinegar, and sugar before landing in a subtly spiced white curry. The combination makes for a sweet, aromatic-heavy dish ideally paired with any of the restaurant’s maximalist cocktails (or mocktails).

Doughnuts and chai at Pip's Original Doughnuts & Chai

Yes, tourists love to talk about Voodoo Doughnut and its outlandish fried creations, but Pip’s is a local favorite for piping hot, freshly fried doughnuts, simply adorned with a drizzle of honey or a coating of cinnamon sugar. Paired with a cup of house chai, it’s extremely hard to beat — especially on your birthday, when a dozen mini-doughnuts are free.

Teriyaki chicken at Du's Grill

Name-dropped by the rapper Aminé and once called the “best Korean teriyaki in the known universe,” a plate of char-blistered, juicy chicken drenched in sweet teriyaki, served with a scoop of rice and a poppyseed-dressed salad, is a rite of passage for those who grew up in Portland. The menu has a few other options — yakisoba, a tofu bowl — but when you’re at Du’s, you’re in it for the chicken.

Smoked bone marrow clam chowder at Ox

It’s perhaps a little odd that the most famous dish from this Northeast Portland Latin American steakhouse is neither Latin American nor a steak, but the clam chowder with a smoked, jalapeño-dotted marrow bone at Ox remains not only a bucket list order at the restaurant, but in the city. Now that Portland’s bone marrow luge fever and Paley’s Place escargot with marrow bones are things of the past, Ox is one of the last bastions of bone marrow love in town, and the restaurant’s chowder remains shockingly delicate considering the sum of its parts.

Miang som and kanom krok at Langbaan

This supper club within Northwest Portland’s Phuket Cafe changes its menu monthly, but a few snacks never seem to leave the menu: the miang som, a betel leaf filled with jewels of cara cara orange and shrimp, as well as the kanom krok, a sweet Hokkaido scallop dressed with coconut cream in a crispy rice cup. Both are perfect little bites, frequently discussed and treasured, when people talk about their meals at one of the city’s finest tasting menu spots.

Aerated Camembert from Heavenly Creatures

File this map point under “new icons”: This Northeast Broadway wine bar has two different dishes that could have landed on this map, between the yellowtail-tonnato toast and this take on a cheese course. However, the latter is truly inventive, and captures the whimsical culinary voice of the city. High brow-low brow is basically a Portland cliche at this point, and this fussy take on Cheez Whiz certainly fits the bill in an ultra-fun way. Eat it alongside a glass of Oregon-made wine.

Fried chicken melt at Jojo

This legendary fried chicken sandwich destination known for its Instagram has opened a full-on restaurant in the Pearl District, serving its likely most-photographed sandwich: crispy-fried thighs smashed between shokupan with coleslaw, ranch, and both cheddar and American. There are plenty of fantastic sandwiches at Jojo — the spicy chicken comes to mind — but when it comes to something distinct to the brand, a cross-section of this gorgeous sandwich (and a side of massive jojos) is hard to top. The cart has reopened as well, so you can get that sandwich at either location.

Oregon croissant at Ken's Artisan Bakery

Ken’s Artisan Bakery is a pastry destination for a reason, but when it comes to the dish that is characteristic of the state, it’s hard to beat the Oregon Croissant. A melange of marionberry and hazelnut cream — two Oregon icons in their own right — the croissant uses a flavorful Pacific Northwestern flour for an added nuttiness. It’s a combination of Portland tropes: local fruit and exceptional baked goods.

Onion rings at Ringside Steakhouse

Ringside Steakhouse’s onion rings are the things of local legend. Renowned local gourmand James Beard called the onion rings the finest he had ever eaten in the United States: wide, lightly battered rings served with a gravy boat of thousand island. For a luxe upgrade, the rings are particularly tasty when dunked in a side of house bearnaise.

Foie gras profiteroles at Le Pigeon

Some might lobby for the beef cheek bourguignon at Gabriel Rucker's Burnside bistro, but this savory-leaning dessert, on the menu from the very beginning, is a better representation of the what has made the restaurant famous: It's playful, experimental, rich, and mind-blowing. There’s a reason these foie gras ice cream sandwiches, finished with drizzle of caramel and salt, have never left the menu.

Steam burgers at Canard

When the casual counterpart to the lauded Le Pigeon opened, its tiny steam burgers were the obvious breakaway hit. Sure, the duck gravy-smothered pancakes and foie gras dumplings developed their devotees, but the simple steam burgers — bolstered with French onion soup flavors in the patty, blanketed in melty American — steal the show. It’s one of those classic Portland high-low deals: sitting in a beautiful brasserie-esque dining room, sipping a glass of orange wine, and inhaling a pile of impeccably executed mini-burgers.

Soft serve with a cowboy hat at Cheese & Crack

Ten years ago, Salt & Straw was likely the most commonly spotted Portland ice cream on Instagram, but now, as Salt & Straw shops open all over the country, Portlanders are far more inclined to share shots of this cheese shop’s lanky towers of soft serve, dusted in various flavor powders and topped with a picture-perfect chocolate cowboy hat. They’re not just pretty, either: The ice cream itself is supremely rich and silky, and the dollop of chocolate ganache at the bottom of the cone is a thoughtful touch.

Related Maps

Nong's Khao Man Gai

From a food cart, an obsession is born. Nong Poonsukwattana started out making one thing meticulously, and in the process she turned a Thai comfort food staple into Portland’s comfort food staple. Since then, her famous khao man gai has spawned two permanent restaurants, a bottled sauce, and deep, visceral craving among everyone who tries it.

Fried brie sticks at Scotch Lodge

The fried brie at this sultry, subterranean cocktail bar and restaurant in Southeast Portland is another prime example of high-brow, low-brow. Sticks of brie get rolled in pumpernickel crumbs before hitting a fryer, finished with a swirl of verjus and a sprinkle of pistachios. They eat like fancy mozzarella sticks, with a more satisfying crunch and gooey center.

Steamed bao burger at Toki

Portland is famous for many a burger, from the smashed patties at Mid City to the peanut butter-pickle-bacon monstrosity at Killer Burger; however, in terms of sheer innovation, the burger at this downtown Portland Korean(ish) restaurant receives top marks. The dry-aged patty, American cheese, white onion, and special sauce is fully encased in bao dough, finished on a griddle for a touch of crunch on the outside. Its brunch-y sibling — which swaps the beef for bacon, egg, cheese, and garlic aioli — gets an honorary mention here, as well.

Charcuterie plate at Olympia Provisions

House-made charcuterie is ubiquitous on Portland menus, thanks in part to the astronomic rise of Olympia Provisions and its USDA-certified curing facility, which is now distributing its sopressatas, chorizos, and saucissons nationwide. At its flagship Southeast Portland restaurant, the charcuterie board could feature a wide range of products, from mortadella to salami to head cheese terrine, depending on the chef's whims of the day.

View this post on Instagram

feed me charcuterie boards all day, every day

A post shared by Jenny Hong (@jennyhongg) on

Insalata Nostrana at Nostrana

Before chicory Caesars were ubiquitous at Italian restaurants, chef Cathy Whims’s simple radicchio salad became one of the city’s most famous, replicated by food bloggers and recipe developers around the country. The bitterness of the chicory is balanced by a satisfyingly Parmigiano-cheesy dressing, with savory herbs like rosemary and sage balancing the acidity of the vinegar in the dressing. It’s best paired with the gnocchi in Marcella Hazan’s tomato-butter sauce, if available.

Herring Under a Fur Coat at Kachka

Pretty much out of the gate, Kachka became an icon for kicking off the Portland Russian food revolution. And this terrine, sort of Ruskie-style seven-layer-dip, is responsible for turning a city onto pickled herring. Its gorgeous gradient and triumphant plating make it a commonly photographed dish, with an elegant flavor on the palate.

Bakes from Bake on the Run

As one of the only food businesses in the country that offers Guyanese cuisine, Bake on the Run’s puffy, stuffed breads — known as “bakes” — have become some the most distinctive food cart dishes available in the city. Here, they arrive filled with salt cod, chana aloo, or even Nutella, best paired with a beer from the nearby Fracture Brewing or a milkshake from neighboring cart Speed-o Cappuccino.

A photo of a vegan bake stuffed with chana aloo curry from Bake on the Run food cart
Chana aloo bake from Bake on the Run.
Bake on the Run

Chicken and jojos at Reel M Inn

Eating fried chicken and thick-cut potato jojos is a sacred ritual in Portland, whether you’re getting them at Sadie Mae’s, Jojo, or Alberta Market (aka Jack’s). But often, when Portlanders talk about chicken and jojos, one name comes to mind: Reel M Inn, also known as the Reel, is a true Portland institution, standing in one form or another for 50 years. Sure, big-deal chefs and writers have praised the colorful dive for ages, but it’s also treasured by locals, who happily spend an evening playing pool, knocking back shots of whiskey, and dunking crispy hunks of potato and chicken into ranch and Frank’s hot sauce.

Mom’s Crab Fat Noodles at Magna

One of the OG dishes on the menu of this Southeast Clinton Filipino restaurant, Magna’s crab fat noodles strike that balance of nostalgic cooking and Portland realness. For this dish, a nod to a pasta made by chef Carlo Lamagna’s mother, house-made squid ink noodles arrive tossed in a rich, luscious crab sauce, which gets its brightness from a combination of corn, peppers, and pickled vegetables. What’s more Oregonian than Dungeness crab and seasonal pickles?

A spoon served with a tangle of crab fat noodles, a squid ink spaghetti dish with a crab fat sauce, at Magna in Portland, Oregon.
Crab fat noodles at Magna.
Brooke Jackson-Glidden/Eater Portland

Cao lau at Rose VL Deli

The soups change daily at this cheery Vietnamese spot, but on Saturdays, the deli crafts a somewhat dry noodle dish that’s almost impossible to find in American restaurants. Thick noodles sit in a bath of aromatic, sweet broth — they should sit for another two minutes once they arrive at the table — before they’re tossed with peanuts, pork, crackers, and an assortment of herbs and greens; the side of core-warming stock is for you to sip separately. Its intricate, careful construction and depth has made it a Saturday tradition throughout Portland.

Totchos at Oaks Bottom Public House

In 1953, F. Nephi Grigg of potato brand Ore-Ida invented the tater tot as a way reduce waste from fry production. The “Ore” in “Ore-Ida” is, of course, Oregon, where the company was founded; the totcho, then, is a particularly Oregonian invention, a tater tot nacho first developed at this Sellwood - Moreland pub. A cross-section of two quintessential bar snacks, the totcho has solidified its spot as Portland drinking food royalty.

Related Maps