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A bowl of Special Kasoy at Kasoy & Co
Special kasoy at Kasoy & Co.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Where to Eat in Gresham and East Portland

Restaurants, food carts, and breweries to hit on the other side of I-205

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Special kasoy at Kasoy & Co.
| Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

It should go without saying Portland is more than the Pearl District, Division Street, or Alberta Arts. As residents in prime neighborhoods get pushed further eastward and areas like Montavilla, Foster-Powell, and Lents get more popular, it’s becoming imperative to expand culinary horizons farther east. In fact, more than 20 percent of all Portland residents live between I-205 and Gresham, a figure that’s only likely to grow.

Unlike inner Portland and the west side with its constant churn, Portland’s east side is home to the old guard, like quintessentially American steakhouses, as well as restaurants and food carts celebrating the cuisines of Somalia, Ukraine, Laos, and beyond.

This map focuses on Gresham and the portion of Portland east of 205 sometimes referred to as “The Numbers,” colloquially. For tacos specifically, see Where to Find Next-Level Tacos in Gresham, or for markets with delis, check out 14 Fantastic Specialty Markets in East Portland. Eastside residents and fans, feel free to chime in on local favorites for future updates.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Takahashi

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This cozy spot on Southeast Holgate serves standard Japanese fare including tempura and ramen, but has become an East Portland mainstay for its sushi. Surrounded by tchotchkes brought from Japan by original owner Seiji Takahashi, sushi chefs cut and assemble ingredients for nigiri, vegetarian sushi, and signature rolls like the avocado-topped “Cholesteroll.” The restaurant’s weekly specials often showcase the whims of the sushi chefs, with things like salmon-and-tuna maki wrapped in mango.

Sayler's Old Country Kitchen

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Out on 105th since 1946, Sayler’s is one of the city’s classic restaurants. The steakhouse suffered a fire and was rebuilt in the late ‘70s, and it shows — charmingly, of course. Sayler’s is known for its hefty t-bone and old-school flourishes, a huge part of the experience, including the relish tray with carrot sticks and canned black olives. Each meal ends with a gratis scoop of ice cream after dinner.

Fork And Spoon Food House

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Across the street from the Parkrose Grocery Outlet, Fork and Spoon House — simply decorated with a Philippine flag, folk art, and TV tuned to a Filipino station — is the place to go for homestyle sisig, bicol express, and the occasional special of sweet Pinoy-style spaghetti with chopped up hotdogs mixed in. Filipino breakfast dishes, “silogs,” with garlic rice, a fried egg, and choice of meat are the move during the day.

Twirling Bird

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Tucked into a nondescript parking lot in the Gateway District, this food cart serves some of Portland’s best chicken. Boasting expertly charred and crispy skin, rotisserie chicken by the quarter, half, or full bird is supplemented by sides like smashed fried potatoes and brown sugar yams. Look out for specials like pork belly, Korean BBQ wings, and parfaits on the cart’s Instagram.

Taipei Noodle Haus

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This no-frills restaurant, stocked with video lottery games, is a Korean-Chinese specialist in disguise. Pros know to skip the chow mein and kung pao chicken, instead opting for dishes that feature chewy, hand-pulled noodles like the zha jiang mian black bean seafood noodles or “chow ma” spicy seafood noodle soup. Taipei Noodle Haus is generally a takeout standby, but those who wish to can sit with a Hite and dine onsite.

La Osita

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Nearby Mill Park residents are lucky enough to snag La Osita’s Mexican breakfast fare and a cup of Proyecto Diaz coffee in the morning, though the food cart stays open until late lunch. Co-owner Elizabeth Guerrero — who moved to Portland from Puebla, Mexico when she was four — serves her memorable brunch tacos with a hard-fried egg, sauteed peppers, and slice of thick-cut bacon, topped with pink pickled onions and default mild green salsa. Along with Jet Black Coffee, this small cart in a strip mall parking lot is one of the few businesses offering explicitly vegan menu options east of 205.

hand holding a brunch taco from La Osita.
La Osita’s brunch taco.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Sisters Ethiopian Restaurant

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East Portland is home to many residents from East Africa, which means it’s not hard to find Ethiopian food. However, Mill Park’s Sisters offers a casual sit-down experience with a tight menu. While much of Ethiopian cuisine is vegan-friendly, Sisters also offers beef and lamb in the form of tibs, a spicy stew seasoned with berberé, as well as kifto, a raw minced beef dish similar to steak tartare. Those looking to feed a few can go for a combo, an assortment of some of the restaurant’s best dishes.

Salama International Bazaar

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Compared to other East African cuisines like Eritrean and Ethiopian, Somali food is less commonly found in Portland restaurants. For a plate of suqaar (stewed beef, peppers, and onions) or kaykay (stir-fried strips of chicken and sabayad, flaky paratha, served with a lime-heavy, spicy green sauce), head out to Salama International Bazaar, a restaurant with comfortable chairs and patterned silk tablecloths, next to a Somali mini-mall. Most entrees are served with a choice of buttery rice, spaghetti and marinara, or anjeero, a spongy flatbread traditionally made with sorghum flour.

A plate of kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Selena's Custom Kitchen

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This Sandy Boulevard food cart en route to Costco opened during the pandemic, with some of the city’s strongest soul food. Instead of a sprawling roster of classics, owner and cook Selena Taylor specializes in three things: fried fish (salmon or basa, a type of catfish) served with house-made tartar sauce, crawfish étouffée, and comforting desserts like caramel pudding. Diners can order a sampler to try all of the above, which also comes with braised mustard greens enriched with smoked turkey and cornbread. Be on the lookout for creamy mac and cheese and peach cobbler, which are frequent specials.

Von Ebert Brewing Glendoveer

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Formerly Ringside East, Von Ebert Brewing took over the midcentury clubhouse restaurant at the Glendoveer golf course in 2018. The well-preserved restaurant with vaulted ceilings and globe light fixtures still serves Ringside’s famous steak bites and horseradish sauce, as well as house-smoked wings, smoked brisket sandwiches, and a roster of pizzas. The varied tap list includes seasonal lagers, fermented sours, and wild farmhouse ales.

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Today was a good day.

A post shared by Von Ebert Brewing (@vebrewing) on

Birrieria La Plaza

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For messy tacos, quesadillas, and cups of consomé, this ketchup-red food cart Birrieria La Plaza on Southeast Stark has quickly become a standout amid East Portland’s birria belt. The restaurant’s crunchy vampiros are a particular favorite, but it’s worth taking home as much of the restaurant’s deeply savory soup as possible.

Level Beer

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This sprawling family-friendly brewery in an industrial patch where Costco is the lone nearby landmark serves everything from popular hazy IPAs to saisons made with plum and tamarind. Food is available from a number of carts outside, including sourdough pizza from Barley Sprout and even oysters on the half-shell from Tidal Boar Foods. There are a few bar-height tables and chairs inside and picnic tables on the covered patio.

Level Beer concrete counter and taps.
Counter at Level Beer.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

La Villa Grill & Bar

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In downtown Rockwood, diners at La Villa tuck into traditional Mexican dishes such as Jalisco-style pozole rojo and chiles en nogada, as well as a sizable selection of seafood. The mariscos on the menu include tacos gobernador and shrimp or octopus prepared “zarandeado” style. The mariscada grande — a show-stopping seafood sampler platter with salmon, octopus, and four types of shrimp — is ideal for a celebratory group dinner.

Kasoy & Co

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Specializing in Lao food, Kasoy is a food cart pod standout next to a self-storage operation that’s easily missable if buzzing down Burnside. Those who stop will be rewarded with the namesake soup, kasoy: a large bowl of bone broth filled with fresh wide rice noodles, topped with minced pork sauce, cherry tomatoes, quail eggs, and beef meatballs. Some of the menu leans Thai (and even Korean), but the tham mak hoong, a Laotian-style papaya salad made with fermented crab, or the fried milk fish served with spicy Laotian dipping sauce jeow som, are both standouts.

Red Kasoy & Co food and a picnic table.
Kasoy & Co food cart.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Nicholas Restaurant Lebanese and Mediterranean Cuisine

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The Gresham outpost of the popular family-run Lebanese restaurant serves the same freshly baked pita, creamy hummus, pizzas, and meze the original is known for. Right on the quintessential small-town main drag, Nicholas, with its gold and scarlet color scheme, is suburban-style spacious with generous room between the solid wood tables and wrought-iron chairs. It’s worth saving room for dessert, with options like chocolate-peanut butter baklava.

Tamale Factory

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Gresham might be a taco-lovers paradise, but tamale fanatics can find a stunning array at a strip mall on the border of Troutdale. “Food To Go” lettered on the side of the shop hints at the simple wooden tables and chairs within, though even if the cutlery is disposable, the plates are not. It’s hard to go wrong at Tamale Factory, whether customers order the restaurant’s corn husk tamales, like the pork in red sauce, or the Oaxacan-style chicken mole tamales wrapped and steamed in aromatic banana leaves.

Imm Dee Thai Restaurant & Bar

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Gresham’s Imm Dee also functions as a sports bar, so it’s entirely possible to enjoy a few skewers of happy hour satay with a vodka-spiked Thai iced tea or a full table-service meal while keeping an eye on the game. The menu doesn’t stray too far from standards, but read between the lines and it gets more interesting. A dish simply called Bangkok seafood appears to be a rendition of Thai curry crab, made from curry powder and evaporated milk (half and half is used here), and Thai pho with beef meatballs closely resembles boat noodles, minus the liver and pig’s blood. Perfectionists can adjust seasonings to taste, using the ground chile powder or chile-infused fish sauce in the caddies on the wooden tables.

Takahashi

This cozy spot on Southeast Holgate serves standard Japanese fare including tempura and ramen, but has become an East Portland mainstay for its sushi. Surrounded by tchotchkes brought from Japan by original owner Seiji Takahashi, sushi chefs cut and assemble ingredients for nigiri, vegetarian sushi, and signature rolls like the avocado-topped “Cholesteroll.” The restaurant’s weekly specials often showcase the whims of the sushi chefs, with things like salmon-and-tuna maki wrapped in mango.

Sayler's Old Country Kitchen

Out on 105th since 1946, Sayler’s is one of the city’s classic restaurants. The steakhouse suffered a fire and was rebuilt in the late ‘70s, and it shows — charmingly, of course. Sayler’s is known for its hefty t-bone and old-school flourishes, a huge part of the experience, including the relish tray with carrot sticks and canned black olives. Each meal ends with a gratis scoop of ice cream after dinner.

Fork And Spoon Food House

Across the street from the Parkrose Grocery Outlet, Fork and Spoon House — simply decorated with a Philippine flag, folk art, and TV tuned to a Filipino station — is the place to go for homestyle sisig, bicol express, and the occasional special of sweet Pinoy-style spaghetti with chopped up hotdogs mixed in. Filipino breakfast dishes, “silogs,” with garlic rice, a fried egg, and choice of meat are the move during the day.

Twirling Bird

Tucked into a nondescript parking lot in the Gateway District, this food cart serves some of Portland’s best chicken. Boasting expertly charred and crispy skin, rotisserie chicken by the quarter, half, or full bird is supplemented by sides like smashed fried potatoes and brown sugar yams. Look out for specials like pork belly, Korean BBQ wings, and parfaits on the cart’s Instagram.

Taipei Noodle Haus

This no-frills restaurant, stocked with video lottery games, is a Korean-Chinese specialist in disguise. Pros know to skip the chow mein and kung pao chicken, instead opting for dishes that feature chewy, hand-pulled noodles like the zha jiang mian black bean seafood noodles or “chow ma” spicy seafood noodle soup. Taipei Noodle Haus is generally a takeout standby, but those who wish to can sit with a Hite and dine onsite.

La Osita

hand holding a brunch taco from La Osita.
La Osita’s brunch taco.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Nearby Mill Park residents are lucky enough to snag La Osita’s Mexican breakfast fare and a cup of Proyecto Diaz coffee in the morning, though the food cart stays open until late lunch. Co-owner Elizabeth Guerrero — who moved to Portland from Puebla, Mexico when she was four — serves her memorable brunch tacos with a hard-fried egg, sauteed peppers, and slice of thick-cut bacon, topped with pink pickled onions and default mild green salsa. Along with Jet Black Coffee, this small cart in a strip mall parking lot is one of the few businesses offering explicitly vegan menu options east of 205.

hand holding a brunch taco from La Osita.
La Osita’s brunch taco.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Sisters Ethiopian Restaurant

East Portland is home to many residents from East Africa, which means it’s not hard to find Ethiopian food. However, Mill Park’s Sisters offers a casual sit-down experience with a tight menu. While much of Ethiopian cuisine is vegan-friendly, Sisters also offers beef and lamb in the form of tibs, a spicy stew seasoned with berberé, as well as kifto, a raw minced beef dish similar to steak tartare. Those looking to feed a few can go for a combo, an assortment of some of the restaurant’s best dishes.

Salama International Bazaar

A plate of kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Compared to other East African cuisines like Eritrean and Ethiopian, Somali food is less commonly found in Portland restaurants. For a plate of suqaar (stewed beef, peppers, and onions) or kaykay (stir-fried strips of chicken and sabayad, flaky paratha, served with a lime-heavy, spicy green sauce), head out to Salama International Bazaar, a restaurant with comfortable chairs and patterned silk tablecloths, next to a Somali mini-mall. Most entrees are served with a choice of buttery rice, spaghetti and marinara, or anjeero, a spongy flatbread traditionally made with sorghum flour.

A plate of kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Kaykay at Salama International Bazaar.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Selena's Custom Kitchen

This Sandy Boulevard food cart en route to Costco opened during the pandemic, with some of the city’s strongest soul food. Instead of a sprawling roster of classics, owner and cook Selena Taylor specializes in three things: fried fish (salmon or basa, a type of catfish) served with house-made tartar sauce, crawfish étouffée, and comforting desserts like caramel pudding. Diners can order a sampler to try all of the above, which also comes with braised mustard greens enriched with smoked turkey and cornbread. Be on the lookout for creamy mac and cheese and peach cobbler, which are frequent specials.

Von Ebert Brewing Glendoveer

Formerly Ringside East, Von Ebert Brewing took over the midcentury clubhouse restaurant at the Glendoveer golf course in 2018. The well-preserved restaurant with vaulted ceilings and globe light fixtures still serves Ringside’s famous steak bites and horseradish sauce, as well as house-smoked wings, smoked brisket sandwiches, and a roster of pizzas. The varied tap list includes seasonal lagers, fermented sours, and wild farmhouse ales.

View this post on Instagram

Today was a good day.

A post shared by Von Ebert Brewing (@vebrewing) on

Birrieria La Plaza

For messy tacos, quesadillas, and cups of consomé, this ketchup-red food cart Birrieria La Plaza on Southeast Stark has quickly become a standout amid East Portland’s birria belt. The restaurant’s crunchy vampiros are a particular favorite, but it’s worth taking home as much of the restaurant’s deeply savory soup as possible.

Level Beer

Level Beer concrete counter and taps.
Counter at Level Beer.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

This sprawling family-friendly brewery in an industrial patch where Costco is the lone nearby landmark serves everything from popular hazy IPAs to saisons made with plum and tamarind. Food is available from a number of carts outside, including sourdough pizza from Barley Sprout and even oysters on the half-shell from Tidal Boar Foods. There are a few bar-height tables and chairs inside and picnic tables on the covered patio.

Level Beer concrete counter and taps.
Counter at Level Beer.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

La Villa Grill & Bar

In downtown Rockwood, diners at La Villa tuck into traditional Mexican dishes such as Jalisco-style pozole rojo and chiles en nogada, as well as a sizable selection of seafood. The mariscos on the menu include tacos gobernador and shrimp or octopus prepared “zarandeado” style. The mariscada grande — a show-stopping seafood sampler platter with salmon, octopus, and four types of shrimp — is ideal for a celebratory group dinner.

Kasoy & Co

Red Kasoy & Co food and a picnic table.
Kasoy & Co food cart.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Specializing in Lao food, Kasoy is a food cart pod standout next to a self-storage operation that’s easily missable if buzzing down Burnside. Those who stop will be rewarded with the namesake soup, kasoy: a large bowl of bone broth filled with fresh wide rice noodles, topped with minced pork sauce, cherry tomatoes, quail eggs, and beef meatballs. Some of the menu leans Thai (and even Korean), but the tham mak hoong, a Laotian-style papaya salad made with fermented crab, or the fried milk fish served with spicy Laotian dipping sauce jeow som, are both standouts.

Red Kasoy & Co food and a picnic table.
Kasoy & Co food cart.
Krista Garcia/Eater Portland

Nicholas Restaurant Lebanese and Mediterranean Cuisine

The Gresham outpost of the popular family-run Lebanese restaurant serves the same freshly baked pita, creamy hummus, pizzas, and meze the original is known for. Right on the quintessential small-town main drag, Nicholas, with its gold and scarlet color scheme, is suburban-style spacious with generous room between the solid wood tables and wrought-iron chairs. It’s worth saving room for dessert, with options like chocolate-peanut butter baklava.

Related Maps

Tamale Factory

Gresham might be a taco-lovers paradise, but tamale fanatics can find a stunning array at a strip mall on the border of Troutdale. “Food To Go” lettered on the side of the shop hints at the simple wooden tables and chairs within, though even if the cutlery is disposable, the plates are not. It’s hard to go wrong at Tamale Factory, whether customers order the restaurant’s corn husk tamales, like the pork in red sauce, or the Oaxacan-style chicken mole tamales wrapped and steamed in aromatic banana leaves.

Imm Dee Thai Restaurant & Bar

Gresham’s Imm Dee also functions as a sports bar, so it’s entirely possible to enjoy a few skewers of happy hour satay with a vodka-spiked Thai iced tea or a full table-service meal while keeping an eye on the game. The menu doesn’t stray too far from standards, but read between the lines and it gets more interesting. A dish simply called Bangkok seafood appears to be a rendition of Thai curry crab, made from curry powder and evaporated milk (half and half is used here), and Thai pho with beef meatballs closely resembles boat noodles, minus the liver and pig’s blood. Perfectionists can adjust seasonings to taste, using the ground chile powder or chile-infused fish sauce in the caddies on the wooden tables.

Related Maps