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Two hands hold a white plate lined with a jalapeno topped maki roll.
Maki at Kaizen Sushi.
Hector Nunez

21 Knockout Sushi Restaurants in Portland and Beyond

The places in Portland for standout nigiri and rolls

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Maki at Kaizen Sushi.
| Hector Nunez

As a city with ample access to high-quality fish and nationally celebrated Japanese food, Portland knows its way around some sushi. Still, the sushi scene in Portland has continued to improve over the last few years, from exciting and affordable additions like Fish & Rice and Yoshi’s to nationally recognized staples like Zilla Sake and Nimblefish.

Portland has lost some of its finest sushi restaurants over the course of the pandemic. Nonetheless, there are several exceptional spots to devour tuna-draped nigiri, swirls of salmon maki, and ultra-creamy slabs of scallop sashimi, either in a lively dining room or on an al fresco patio. Some are old-school favorites for sushi bento and conveyor belt rolls; others are new kids on the block incorporating non-traditional ingredients. But all of them have their place in the city’s larger sushi scene.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Syun Izakaya

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A homey izakaya in Hillsboro, Syun also offers quality sushi as well. Artfully laid-out plates of sashimi, cut generously, are a real draw at Syun, as well as its flashy maki stuffed with crab or blanketed with seared scallop. While there are plenty of sushi options to indulge in at Syun, the assorted plates and donburi — many featuring raw seafood — really shine here. For example, the Hokkaido chirashi offers a particularly artful spread of salmon, crab, scallops, sea urchin, and salmon roe.

Yuubi Sushi

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Tucked away near the main strip of downtown Beaverton, Yuubi is one of the west side’s best spots for sushi. Chef Ricky Tam orders bluefin tuna and amberjack directly from Japan and dry ages fish to achieve a rich umami taste. Yuubi has a spacious patio, but diners who opt for indoor seating will get a view of the week’s shipment hanging inside the dry ager. For those looking for something special, the restaurant offers a taste of luxury, topping sushi rolls with ingredients like black truffle and premium uni.

Koya Sushi

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This sushi spot in downtown Beaverton, Koya serves a sizable menu full of fun appetizers, Japanese classics and sushi. Although Koya has a tremendous amount of rolls on the menu, the tempura rolls are the clear draw, ranging from a surf-and-turf roll with wagyu and shrimp to a lobster roll with avocado. This is also a spot that offers baked sushi, filled with everything from crab to scallops.

Sushi Ki-ichi

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A true west-side gem, Ki-Ichi serves impeccable fish that is remarkably inexpensive, considering the quality; the restaurant’s sweet shrimp is particularly well done. Opt for the restaurant’s remarkably inexpensive omakase options, a chef’s selection that doesn’t exceed $35. While many appetizers and side dishes are negligible at sushi restaurants, Ki-Ichi’s stands out, with everything from dashimaki tamago to an array of udon. 

Chef Kazumi Boyd spent time at restaurants like Masu and Bamboo Sushi before opening her St. Johns sushi cart in 2016. Here, she shows incredible versatility as a sushi chef, filling maki with fried oysters or kabocha squash, meticulously slicing Hokkaido scallops for nigiri, and pairing umeboshi with shiso and a pop of bright cucumber. It’s best to call in your order ahead of time, to avoid a wait.

While Sho has a colossal list of Japanese comfort foods, the sushi isn’t to be ignored here: Sho offers a high-end experience of sushi even for takeout. The long list of nigiri and sushi rolls will probably include any diner’s go-tos, including some harder-to-find things like uni; the move is to pair a handful of nigiri or maki with comfort foods like Japanese curry and yakitori. Keep an eye out for bluefin rolls, when it’s in season.

Yoshi's Sushi

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Working in a small Multnomah Village cart doesn’t stop Yoshi Ikeda, a former Bamboo Sushi chef, from serving up high-caliber sushi. Yoshi’s serves a small menu of innovative rolls and rotating nigiri, as well as sporadic omakase dinners and and the occasional handroll. Though some of the specials and desserts aren’t currently offered, Yoshi’s meticulously seared scallop nigiri with the yuzu pepper marmalade continues to be the star of the show. Yoshi’s is currently slinging takeout via phone orders only, with onsite dining at the Multnomah Village French Quarter pod.

Fish & Rice

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Here, diners will find a garden’s worth of gorgeous plants, modestly priced sushi, and a curated list of craft beer, wine, sake, and whiskey. The foundation of the menu is the immense list of rolls, but the highlights are usually on the specials menu, from yellowtail collar to Miyazaki wagyu nigiri. While some of the rotating options are gone, patrons can check Instagram for updates on what Fish & Rice is serving that day.

Masu Sushi

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An oldie but a goodie, Masu has been serving a refined sushi menu downtown for more than 15 years. A defining characteristic of Masu is its modern space and menu, which boasts an extensive selection of sushi including some stellar vegetarian rolls. The restaurant also offers showy options like tempura-fried rolls, though simpler, locally caught seafood rolls here usually please — Oregon coast-caught albacore or Dungeness crab, house-smoked salmon, etc. Masu is currently open for takeout and delivery, as well as limited dine in.

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Hamono Sushi

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This hole-in-the-wall downtown restaurant serves reasonably priced omakase, in sets of five or seven pieces of nigiri, which are even available for delivery and takeout. Market specials run the gamut from akami — a cut found around the spine and tail of bluefin tuna — to Hokkaido scallop. For a bite of something rarely found in Portland, try the restaurant’s A5 wagyu nigiri.

This little traditional Japanese gem can be found right across from the Keller Auditorium, serving everything from Japanese hotpot dishes to house-cured mackerel. Murata’s greatest strengths lie in the sushi sets and fish selection, allowing diners to either hand over control to the chef or pick their favorites a la carte. Murata is offering takeout, as well as dine-in.

Sushi Ichiban

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Conveyor belt sushi has its devotees, and the Old Town staple Sushi Ichiban has been one of the city’s favorites for decades. The fish is fresh, well-priced, and generous in its portions, trailing behind a toy train engine on a continuously spinning track. This isn’t the spot for omakase, but when looking for a slab of salmon nigiri, spicy tuna hand rolls, or creamy scallops, Sushi Ichiban delivers — via a tiny train car.

Kaizen Sushi

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From the same owners as Portland sushi standby Mirakutei, this new downtown sushi restaurant not only offers Oregon Dungeness sashimi and a variety of salmon and mackerel cuts; it also heads into inventive territory, topping maki with garlic butter or yuzu tobiko. Start with the restaurant’s distinctive ponzu “ceviche,” before opting for a salmon flight — a round of salmon belly, salmon aburi, ocean trout and wild sockeye nigiri. Those who love the super-involved rolls should finish with the Pacific NW roll, Dungeness and spicy albacore topped with more albacore, pesto, tempura, and eel sauce.

Mirakutei Sushi & Ramen

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A legendary Portland sushi restaurant, Mirakutei was once home to chefs like Hiro Ikegaya, before it was purchased by longtime employees and brothers Nicolas and Job Martinez. Here, people can find delights like Dungeness crab nigiri and hamachi belly sashimi, alongside classics like sweet shrimp and bigeye tuna. Beyond the wide assortment of sushi, sashimi, and nigiri, Mirakutei’s appetizer menu includes a number of preparations of raw seafood, from salmon belly with grapefruit to scallops with uni, yuzu, and white truffle.

Bluefin Tuna & Sushi

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Originally from South Korea, Bluefin Tuna and Sushi has expanded into Northeast Portland. Bluefin is probably most recognizable by the cute round sushi it serves, offering a different aesthetic than most sushi places in Portland. The name “Bluefin Tuna” isn’t just for show either: Bluefin slings various cuts of bluefin tuna at market price. The move is to hit up Bluefin during happy hour, when six-piece maki sets clock in at $5; happy hour runs daily from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Saburo’s

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A Sellwood sushi institution, Saburo’s is well-known for its sizable portions of nigiri, sashimi, and sushi rolls. For a roll that’s specific to Saburo’s, order the Sabu roll (red tuna, salmon, yellowtail or albacore, avocado, cucumber, smelt roe), which is named after restaurant owner Saburo Nakajima. The restaurant is not on any third-party delivery apps, and only takes same-day orders online.

Zilla Sake

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Known for their meticulous sourcing and high-quality sushi options, the effortlessly cool and casual Zilla has become a destination for rare sake and fresh sushi. Chef Kate Koo serves fun oddities such as monkfish liver and wild fluke alongside classic sushi options like salmon and tuna. Highlights include Oregon-caught wild King salmon to Hokkaido scallops, served alongside Oregon-grown wasabi. Shocking no one, this is also a nice spot to pair sushi with distinctive sakes.

Nimblefish

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Portland’s very own Edomae-style sushi restaurant, Nimblefish serves stunning cured and fresh fish in its most traditional form of nigiri or sashimi in a tight-quarters cafe. Fish rotates seasonally and shows off a variety of curing techniques, as well as simple, fresh slices of fish. When stopping in for omakase, it’s worth it to add on specialty options like Bafun uni or A5 wagyu that’s seared with a hand-torch just until the fat begins to render. Make a reservation for dine-in here.

Kashiwagi

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This Division-area sushi spot is the return of the now-closed, beloved Sushi Takahashi 2, a conveyor-belt sushi spot in Southwest Portland. At Kashiwagi, Takeo Kashiwagi tops soft pillows of rice with coho, pickled mackerel, and crab, rolling chopped scallops with chili mayo for maki and frying calamari for tempura sushi. Kashiwagi is also a spot that sells inexpensive hand rolls, for those who want a more tactile sushi experience.

Yoko's Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

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Gladstone institution Yoko’s has held a cult following for decades, delightfully old-school with a range of reasonably priced nigiri and elaborate maki. Yoko’s offers a wide selection of salmon, from ikura to skin to smoked, as well as fan favorites like the poki roll, ahi and albacore — seared and raw — over a cucumber-avocado roll. For a heartier option, opt for the restaurant’s generous chirashi.

Musashi’s PDX

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The Washington-based sushi chain expanded into Oregon with a location on Southeast Belmont Street in late 2020 and has since opened two more restaurants: One in Hillsboro and a fast casual location within Happy Valley Food Hall. The restaurant wins points for sheer bang-for-your-buck: The sushi is shockingly inexpensive and generous with its portions, with maki classics like spicy tuna, California rolls, and broiled eel. Musashi’s Belmont location is also home to a mochi doughnut brand, Tochi, which is currently on hiatus.  

Syun Izakaya

A homey izakaya in Hillsboro, Syun also offers quality sushi as well. Artfully laid-out plates of sashimi, cut generously, are a real draw at Syun, as well as its flashy maki stuffed with crab or blanketed with seared scallop. While there are plenty of sushi options to indulge in at Syun, the assorted plates and donburi — many featuring raw seafood — really shine here. For example, the Hokkaido chirashi offers a particularly artful spread of salmon, crab, scallops, sea urchin, and salmon roe.

Yuubi Sushi

Tucked away near the main strip of downtown Beaverton, Yuubi is one of the west side’s best spots for sushi. Chef Ricky Tam orders bluefin tuna and amberjack directly from Japan and dry ages fish to achieve a rich umami taste. Yuubi has a spacious patio, but diners who opt for indoor seating will get a view of the week’s shipment hanging inside the dry ager. For those looking for something special, the restaurant offers a taste of luxury, topping sushi rolls with ingredients like black truffle and premium uni.

Koya Sushi

This sushi spot in downtown Beaverton, Koya serves a sizable menu full of fun appetizers, Japanese classics and sushi. Although Koya has a tremendous amount of rolls on the menu, the tempura rolls are the clear draw, ranging from a surf-and-turf roll with wagyu and shrimp to a lobster roll with avocado. This is also a spot that offers baked sushi, filled with everything from crab to scallops.

Sushi Ki-ichi

A true west-side gem, Ki-Ichi serves impeccable fish that is remarkably inexpensive, considering the quality; the restaurant’s sweet shrimp is particularly well done. Opt for the restaurant’s remarkably inexpensive omakase options, a chef’s selection that doesn’t exceed $35. While many appetizers and side dishes are negligible at sushi restaurants, Ki-Ichi’s stands out, with everything from dashimaki tamago to an array of udon. 

Kazumi

Chef Kazumi Boyd spent time at restaurants like Masu and Bamboo Sushi before opening her St. Johns sushi cart in 2016. Here, she shows incredible versatility as a sushi chef, filling maki with fried oysters or kabocha squash, meticulously slicing Hokkaido scallops for nigiri, and pairing umeboshi with shiso and a pop of bright cucumber. It’s best to call in your order ahead of time, to avoid a wait.

Sho

While Sho has a colossal list of Japanese comfort foods, the sushi isn’t to be ignored here: Sho offers a high-end experience of sushi even for takeout. The long list of nigiri and sushi rolls will probably include any diner’s go-tos, including some harder-to-find things like uni; the move is to pair a handful of nigiri or maki with comfort foods like Japanese curry and yakitori. Keep an eye out for bluefin rolls, when it’s in season.

Yoshi's Sushi

Working in a small Multnomah Village cart doesn’t stop Yoshi Ikeda, a former Bamboo Sushi chef, from serving up high-caliber sushi. Yoshi’s serves a small menu of innovative rolls and rotating nigiri, as well as sporadic omakase dinners and and the occasional handroll. Though some of the specials and desserts aren’t currently offered, Yoshi’s meticulously seared scallop nigiri with the yuzu pepper marmalade continues to be the star of the show. Yoshi’s is currently slinging takeout via phone orders only, with onsite dining at the Multnomah Village French Quarter pod.

Fish & Rice

Here, diners will find a garden’s worth of gorgeous plants, modestly priced sushi, and a curated list of craft beer, wine, sake, and whiskey. The foundation of the menu is the immense list of rolls, but the highlights are usually on the specials menu, from yellowtail collar to Miyazaki wagyu nigiri. While some of the rotating options are gone, patrons can check Instagram for updates on what Fish & Rice is serving that day.

Masu Sushi

An oldie but a goodie, Masu has been serving a refined sushi menu downtown for more than 15 years. A defining characteristic of Masu is its modern space and menu, which boasts an extensive selection of sushi including some stellar vegetarian rolls. The restaurant also offers showy options like tempura-fried rolls, though simpler, locally caught seafood rolls here usually please — Oregon coast-caught albacore or Dungeness crab, house-smoked salmon, etc. Masu is currently open for takeout and delivery, as well as limited dine in.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Tales In Toscana (@tales_in_toscana) on

Hamono Sushi

This hole-in-the-wall downtown restaurant serves reasonably priced omakase, in sets of five or seven pieces of nigiri, which are even available for delivery and takeout. Market specials run the gamut from akami — a cut found around the spine and tail of bluefin tuna — to Hokkaido scallop. For a bite of something rarely found in Portland, try the restaurant’s A5 wagyu nigiri.

Murata

This little traditional Japanese gem can be found right across from the Keller Auditorium, serving everything from Japanese hotpot dishes to house-cured mackerel. Murata’s greatest strengths lie in the sushi sets and fish selection, allowing diners to either hand over control to the chef or pick their favorites a la carte. Murata is offering takeout, as well as dine-in.

Sushi Ichiban

Conveyor belt sushi has its devotees, and the Old Town staple Sushi Ichiban has been one of the city’s favorites for decades. The fish is fresh, well-priced, and generous in its portions, trailing behind a toy train engine on a continuously spinning track. This isn’t the spot for omakase, but when looking for a slab of salmon nigiri, spicy tuna hand rolls, or creamy scallops, Sushi Ichiban delivers — via a tiny train car.

Kaizen Sushi

From the same owners as Portland sushi standby Mirakutei, this new downtown sushi restaurant not only offers Oregon Dungeness sashimi and a variety of salmon and mackerel cuts; it also heads into inventive territory, topping maki with garlic butter or yuzu tobiko. Start with the restaurant’s distinctive ponzu “ceviche,” before opting for a salmon flight — a round of salmon belly, salmon aburi, ocean trout and wild sockeye nigiri. Those who love the super-involved rolls should finish with the Pacific NW roll, Dungeness and spicy albacore topped with more albacore, pesto, tempura, and eel sauce.

Mirakutei Sushi & Ramen

A legendary Portland sushi restaurant, Mirakutei was once home to chefs like Hiro Ikegaya, before it was purchased by longtime employees and brothers Nicolas and Job Martinez. Here, people can find delights like Dungeness crab nigiri and hamachi belly sashimi, alongside classics like sweet shrimp and bigeye tuna. Beyond the wide assortment of sushi, sashimi, and nigiri, Mirakutei’s appetizer menu includes a number of preparations of raw seafood, from salmon belly with grapefruit to scallops with uni, yuzu, and white truffle.

Bluefin Tuna & Sushi

Originally from South Korea, Bluefin Tuna and Sushi has expanded into Northeast Portland. Bluefin is probably most recognizable by the cute round sushi it serves, offering a different aesthetic than most sushi places in Portland. The name “Bluefin Tuna” isn’t just for show either: Bluefin slings various cuts of bluefin tuna at market price. The move is to hit up Bluefin during happy hour, when six-piece maki sets clock in at $5; happy hour runs daily from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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Saburo’s

A Sellwood sushi institution, Saburo’s is well-known for its sizable portions of nigiri, sashimi, and sushi rolls. For a roll that’s specific to Saburo’s, order the Sabu roll (red tuna, salmon, yellowtail or albacore, avocado, cucumber, smelt roe), which is named after restaurant owner Saburo Nakajima. The restaurant is not on any third-party delivery apps, and only takes same-day orders online.

Zilla Sake

Known for their meticulous sourcing and high-quality sushi options, the effortlessly cool and casual Zilla has become a destination for rare sake and fresh sushi. Chef Kate Koo serves fun oddities such as monkfish liver and wild fluke alongside classic sushi options like salmon and tuna. Highlights include Oregon-caught wild King salmon to Hokkaido scallops, served alongside Oregon-grown wasabi. Shocking no one, this is also a nice spot to pair sushi with distinctive sakes.

Nimblefish

Portland’s very own Edomae-style sushi restaurant, Nimblefish serves stunning cured and fresh fish in its most traditional form of nigiri or sashimi in a tight-quarters cafe. Fish rotates seasonally and shows off a variety of curing techniques, as well as simple, fresh slices of fish. When stopping in for omakase, it’s worth it to add on specialty options like Bafun uni or A5 wagyu that’s seared with a hand-torch just until the fat begins to render. Make a reservation for dine-in here.

Kashiwagi

This Division-area sushi spot is the return of the now-closed, beloved Sushi Takahashi 2, a conveyor-belt sushi spot in Southwest Portland. At Kashiwagi, Takeo Kashiwagi tops soft pillows of rice with coho, pickled mackerel, and crab, rolling chopped scallops with chili mayo for maki and frying calamari for tempura sushi. Kashiwagi is also a spot that sells inexpensive hand rolls, for those who want a more tactile sushi experience.

Yoko's Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Gladstone institution Yoko’s has held a cult following for decades, delightfully old-school with a range of reasonably priced nigiri and elaborate maki. Yoko’s offers a wide selection of salmon, from ikura to skin to smoked, as well as fan favorites like the poki roll, ahi and albacore — seared and raw — over a cucumber-avocado roll. For a heartier option, opt for the restaurant’s generous chirashi.

Musashi’s PDX

The Washington-based sushi chain expanded into Oregon with a location on Southeast Belmont Street in late 2020 and has since opened two more restaurants: One in Hillsboro and a fast casual location within Happy Valley Food Hall. The restaurant wins points for sheer bang-for-your-buck: The sushi is shockingly inexpensive and generous with its portions, with maki classics like spicy tuna, California rolls, and broiled eel. Musashi’s Belmont location is also home to a mochi doughnut brand, Tochi, which is currently on hiatus.  

Related Maps