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A photo of the Fiery Wind vegan noodle soup at Jade Rabbit with fermented soy protein chicken, rice noodles, and vegetables
Jade Rabbit’s Fiery Wind noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Where to Find Portland’s Most Comforting Vegan Noodle Soups

Ramen, pho, udon, and more for vegans, vegetarians, and vegetable lovers

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Jade Rabbit’s Fiery Wind noodle soup.
| Waz Wu/Eater Portland

During the cold, rainy months, Portlanders turn to steaming bowls of noodle soups to stay warm and cozy. Luckily for vegans and vegetarians, there are plenty of meatless noodle bowls to choose from, including nutty Japanese tantanmen, spicy Vietnamese bun hue, creamy Burmese khao soi, and tangy sukhothai. To achieve depth of flavor and satisfying textures in their vegan creations, Portland chefs utilize ingredients like shiitake mushrooms, medicinal herb blends, hazelnuts, and coconut milk, to name a few.

Eater’s vegan noodle soup map highlights 16 Portland restaurants representing a range of Southeast and East Asian cuisines. For more options, diners can turn to this noodle soup map and this ramen map, as most shops carry at least one vegan or vegetarian noodle bowl.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Friendship Kitchen NW: Saigon to Singapore

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At this Northwest Portland restaurant, diners can experience both Singaporean and Vietnamese cuisine, including the delicious pho chay from the original Glisan outpost of Friendship Kitchen. Rice noodles and vegetables arrive swimming in a vegan broth with earthy depth and subtle spice — a touch of hoisin enhances those flavors further. For something more on the Singaporean side of things, “Mama’s Laksa” is an adaptation of co-owner Wei-En Tan’s mother’s recipe for the coconut curry noodle soup. Although laksa is traditionally made with dried shrimp paste, Friendship Kitchen NW: Saigon to Singapore serves its version with a vegan broth; customers can request tofu instead of seafood toppings. The shop also slings shareable starters like soy-sugarcane drumsticks drenched in vegan fish sauce and extra-thick garden rolls with meaty tofu skin.

A photo of the vegan pho from Friendship Kitchen, served with a variety of vegetables.
Vegan pho at Friendship Kitchen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Top Burmese

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The Top Burmese family of restaurants were some of the first Portland spots to specialize in the vibrant cuisine of Myanmar. Vegans can choose from a variety of knockout dishes, including eggplant curry and fermented green tea leaf salad; still, the khao soi with a gravy-like coconut curry broth that clings to the chewy wheat noodles is a must-order, thanks to its intense depth of flavor. This bowl comes with crunchy accompaniments: wonton crisps, onions, fried garlic, and cilantro. Sibling restaurants Burma Joy and Bistro Royale offer more seating, but visiting the original, cozier outpost on Northwest 21st for a steamy bowl of khao soi remains one of Portland’s most memorable dining experiences.

A photo of the vegan khao soi coconut curry noodle soup from Top Burmese
Top Burmese vegan khao soi.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Matsunoki Ramen

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Newer to Portland’s ramen scene, this Pine Street Market stall offers a solid selection of vegan options. Diners can snack on fried popcorn tofu and shishito peppers before diving into bowls of rich shoyu slicked with black garlic oil or the fiery vegan red topped with mapo tofu. Bowls arrive with an array of creative toppings, including marinated tofu, collard greens, corn, and green onions. Customers can also find seasonal specials, like vegan pumpkin tantanmen with miso-pumpkin tare and roasted butternut squash on Matsunoki’s menu.

A photo of the vegan garlic shoyu ramen at Matsunoki Ramen topped with marinated tofu
Matsunoki Ramen vegan garlic shoyu.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Kayo's Ramen Bar

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Located on North Williams, Kayo’s Ramen Bar offers a vegan version of almost every bowl. Made with an assari-style kombu, shiitake, and vegetable base, the restaurant’s meatless renditions of classics like shio, shoyu, and miso are solid. However, the real star is the shop’s take on tantanmen, a blend of creamy sesame paste and fiery Sichuan peppercorn. Not for the faint of heart, there’s also a mouth-numbing Sichuan hotpot-style mala ramen. Pair it with a cold Japanese lager or junmai sake. In addition to ramen, Kayo’s offers a number of vegan plates, like kale potstickers, wasabi-infused pickled shiitake mushrooms, and tantan tofu tacos with sliced daikon.

A photo of vegan tantan ramen at Kayo’s Ramen Bar
Kayo’s Ramen Bar vegan tantan ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Wa Kitchen Kuu

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This light-filled Japanese izakaya specializes in hand-made udon and light dashi broths that complement the texture of the noodles. Served with kombu soy vegetable dashi for dipping, the kama-age udon arrives with a tray of condiments like green onions, nori strips, grated ginger, tempura bits, and sesame seeds, allowing diners to mix and match. Wa Kitchen Kuu’s sister restaurants — Shigezo, Yataimura Maru, and Kichinto — also offer other vegan noodles, like miso ramen and veggie soba.

A photo of the vegan kama-age udon and various toppings at Wa Kitchen Kuu
Wa Kitchen Kuu vegan kama-age udon.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Obon Shokudo

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This all-vegan Japanese restaurant is a longtime staple in the Portland vegan community, thanks to its kenchinjiru ginger miso soup and countless onigiri made with house-made misos; however, the udon noodle bowls are equally enjoyable. Smooth, yet springy, the house-made udon pairs beautifully with Obon Shokudo’s curry, finished with shiitake dashi, fried tofu, and kakiage fritters. The restaurant also offers a lighter soy-mushroom broth, as well as gluten-free rice noodles.

A photo of the house-made udon noodle in a curry broth with fried tofu and kakiage fritters at Obon Shokudo
Obon Shokudo curry udon noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Kinboshi Ramen

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Formerly known as Marukin, Kinboshi has been a ramen standby in Portland for several years. Even though it specializes in Hakata-style tonkotsu ramen, this Southeast Ankeny ramen-ya also offers two meatless broths — the creamy umami-rich miso and the lighter soy-milk-based shio tonyu — with the option of a spicy version of each one. Vegan toppings include tofu, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, and shichimi chile. The shop also carries pan-fried gyoza with spinach wrappers and Japanese curry, as well as a stunning cold hazelnut hiyashi ramen during the warmer months.

A photo of the vegan shio tonyu red ramen with a soy milk based broth and assortment of vegetables
Kinboshi vegan shio tonyu red ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Tokyo-based ramen shop Afuri chose to open its first US location in Portland because the soft water from Mount Hood, much like Mount Afuri’s water, is ideal for making ramen noodles. Although the shop specializes in citrusy yuzu ramen, the savory-spicy hazelnut tantanmen is one of the most memorable bowls in town, and it happens to be vegan. Made with umami-rich miso tare, this bowl arrives with bouncy, thick noodles, topped with bok choy, shiitakes, leeks, miso cashew crumbles, and sesame chile oil. Snacks like seaweed salad and crispy eggplant buns make good starters before diving into this next-level bowl.

A photo of Afuri’s vegan hazelnut tantan ramen with bok choy, shiitakes, miso cashew crumbles
Afuri vegan hazelnut tantan ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Xinh Xinh Vietnamese Bistro

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Portland vegans and vegetarians flock to this casual Vietnamese bistro in Southeast Portland for steamy noodle bowls, like the simple-but-tasty pho chay. A major highlight of the menu, the vegan hue (bun bo chay) comes with thick rice noodles, large pieces of spongy tofu, and fresh vegetables with a savory-spicy broth. Xinh Xinh has several other vegan dishes, such as tofu-mushroom banh mi, barbecue “pork” rice plates, and spring rolls with peanut sauce.

A photo of Xinh Xinh’s vegan bun bo chay noodle soup with tofu and vegetables
Xinh Xinh bun bo chay noodle soup.
Xinh Xinh

Jade Rabbit

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While Jade Rabbit is best known as Portland’s only fully vegan restaurant, serving handmade dim sum like rabbit-shaped bawan dumplings and faux pork-stuffed char siu bao, the restaurant has always carried a noodle bowl that easily steals the limelight. Served in a large ceramic bowl, the Fiery Wind noodle soup comes with a soul-soothing Lan Zhou broth that’s slow-cooked with 13 herbs, including star anise, ginger, and Sichuan peppercorn. Delicate and slippery wide rice noodles, three-year fermented soy protein chicken, and crunchy yu choy offer a range of satisfying textures, while the medicinal broth, dotted with chile oil, delivers a spiciness that gradually sneaks up on you.

A photo of Jade Rabbit’s Fiery Wind noodle soup accompanied with turnip cakes, chile oil wontons, and a cocktail at The Emerald Room
Jade Rabbit Fiery Wind noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Outfitted with rustic wood and marquee lettering, this vegetarian restaurant on Division Street is a hot spot for Thai dishes like pad see ew, Panang curry, and pineapple fried rice. Tom yum soup lovers won’t want to miss the restaurant’s version of sukhothai noodle soup — it marries the iconic spicy-zingy broth with rice noodles, crushed peanuts, bean sprouts, and crispy fried wonton wrappers. To pair with this tangy noodle dish, the vegan Thai iced tea with a creamy coconut base is a great choice.

A photo of Kati’s vegan sukho Thai tom yum noodle soup with tofu, bean sprouts, peanuts, and crispy wontons
Kati sukho Thai tom yum noodle soup.
Kati

At this tiny Alberta street cafe and mini market, the simple menu of homey Vietnamese dishes includes a vegan pho that’s worth venturing across town for. Thơm’s pho chay relies on an aromatic broth that’s robust and deeply satisfying, despite the lack of animal products. Diners may have to work their way through the bowl, chock full of Ota tofu, mushrooms, and bok choy, before there’s room to add in Thai basil, bean sprouts, and sliced chiles.

A photo the vegan pho at Thom, accompanied by a plate of vegetables, sriracha, and hoisin
Thom pho chay.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

A favorite among the vegan community, this Pan Asian restaurant on Belmont made a name for itself with memorable dishes like cauliflower curry and coconut mushroom linguine. The wonton noodle soup arrives with a tangle of bouncy vegan egg noodles, bathing in a veggie-mushroom broth accented by star anise. The wontons’ delicate wrappers hold savory-meaty parcels of king oyster mushrooms, while other toppings like five spice-braised tofu and crunchy bok choy are just as enjoyable. Those looking to warm up on a chilly day can try Norah’s volcano noodle soup, with vegetable tempura and glass noodles in a mala broth.

A photo of Norah’s vegan wonton noodle soup with mushroom wontons, five spice braised tofu, bok choy, and cilantro.
Wonton noodle soup at Norah.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Nudi Noodle Place

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At this whimsical and forest-like pan-Asian restaurant in Woodstock, the go-to order is the fragrant Malaysian-style laksa featuring a rich and soothing curry coconut broth and rice noodles topped with a mountain of vegetables and tofu chunks. Those who prefer a lighter broth can opt for the vegetable-heavy green noodle soup. Nudi’s noodle bowls make a hearty entree, but hungrier diners can also enjoy vegan samosas and roasted cauliflower with toasted coconut.

A photo of vegan laksa at Nudi Noodle Place.
Nudi Noodle Place vegan laksa.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Baka Umai

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At Baka Umai on Hawthorne, vegans and vegetarians will find shiitake-vegetable broths and toppings like spicy cabbage, fried tofu, and candied jalapenos. The shop is known for its distinct offerings, like the smoky-spicy-savory soy chorizo ramen with pickled daikon and cilantro, but ramen traditionalists can slurp shoyu and miso ramen here, too. Those looking to crank up the heat can try broths tinged with ghost pepper chile oil or fermented habaneros. Other entrees include mazemen brothless ramen, tsukemen dipping ramen, and bento bowls.

A photo of the vegan ramen at Baka Umai, topped with soy chorizo, cabbage, daikon, and cilantro
Baka Umai soy chorizo ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Van Hanh

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A mainstay in Portland’s vegan food community, this house-turned-restaurant on Division serves an impressive selection of vegan Vietnamese dishes, from rice pancakes to vermicelli bowls. In addition to soothing bowls of pho, noodle soup lovers can enjoy bun rieu with vegan ham in a bright tomato broth or the popular spicy bun hue with thick rice noodles and mock beef. Van Hanh’s menu also offers an opportunity for diners to explore Vietnamese mock meats, like tofu-seaweed fish filets and ham rolls made of bean curd sheets.

A photo of Van Hanh’s bun hue noodle soup with thick rice noodles, tofu, mock beef, and vegetables
Van Hanh bun hue noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Friendship Kitchen NW: Saigon to Singapore

At this Northwest Portland restaurant, diners can experience both Singaporean and Vietnamese cuisine, including the delicious pho chay from the original Glisan outpost of Friendship Kitchen. Rice noodles and vegetables arrive swimming in a vegan broth with earthy depth and subtle spice — a touch of hoisin enhances those flavors further. For something more on the Singaporean side of things, “Mama’s Laksa” is an adaptation of co-owner Wei-En Tan’s mother’s recipe for the coconut curry noodle soup. Although laksa is traditionally made with dried shrimp paste, Friendship Kitchen NW: Saigon to Singapore serves its version with a vegan broth; customers can request tofu instead of seafood toppings. The shop also slings shareable starters like soy-sugarcane drumsticks drenched in vegan fish sauce and extra-thick garden rolls with meaty tofu skin.

A photo of the vegan pho from Friendship Kitchen, served with a variety of vegetables.
Vegan pho at Friendship Kitchen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Top Burmese

The Top Burmese family of restaurants were some of the first Portland spots to specialize in the vibrant cuisine of Myanmar. Vegans can choose from a variety of knockout dishes, including eggplant curry and fermented green tea leaf salad; still, the khao soi with a gravy-like coconut curry broth that clings to the chewy wheat noodles is a must-order, thanks to its intense depth of flavor. This bowl comes with crunchy accompaniments: wonton crisps, onions, fried garlic, and cilantro. Sibling restaurants Burma Joy and Bistro Royale offer more seating, but visiting the original, cozier outpost on Northwest 21st for a steamy bowl of khao soi remains one of Portland’s most memorable dining experiences.

A photo of the vegan khao soi coconut curry noodle soup from Top Burmese
Top Burmese vegan khao soi.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Matsunoki Ramen

Newer to Portland’s ramen scene, this Pine Street Market stall offers a solid selection of vegan options. Diners can snack on fried popcorn tofu and shishito peppers before diving into bowls of rich shoyu slicked with black garlic oil or the fiery vegan red topped with mapo tofu. Bowls arrive with an array of creative toppings, including marinated tofu, collard greens, corn, and green onions. Customers can also find seasonal specials, like vegan pumpkin tantanmen with miso-pumpkin tare and roasted butternut squash on Matsunoki’s menu.

A photo of the vegan garlic shoyu ramen at Matsunoki Ramen topped with marinated tofu
Matsunoki Ramen vegan garlic shoyu.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Kayo's Ramen Bar

Located on North Williams, Kayo’s Ramen Bar offers a vegan version of almost every bowl. Made with an assari-style kombu, shiitake, and vegetable base, the restaurant’s meatless renditions of classics like shio, shoyu, and miso are solid. However, the real star is the shop’s take on tantanmen, a blend of creamy sesame paste and fiery Sichuan peppercorn. Not for the faint of heart, there’s also a mouth-numbing Sichuan hotpot-style mala ramen. Pair it with a cold Japanese lager or junmai sake. In addition to ramen, Kayo’s offers a number of vegan plates, like kale potstickers, wasabi-infused pickled shiitake mushrooms, and tantan tofu tacos with sliced daikon.

A photo of vegan tantan ramen at Kayo’s Ramen Bar
Kayo’s Ramen Bar vegan tantan ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Wa Kitchen Kuu

This light-filled Japanese izakaya specializes in hand-made udon and light dashi broths that complement the texture of the noodles. Served with kombu soy vegetable dashi for dipping, the kama-age udon arrives with a tray of condiments like green onions, nori strips, grated ginger, tempura bits, and sesame seeds, allowing diners to mix and match. Wa Kitchen Kuu’s sister restaurants — Shigezo, Yataimura Maru, and Kichinto — also offer other vegan noodles, like miso ramen and veggie soba.

A photo of the vegan kama-age udon and various toppings at Wa Kitchen Kuu
Wa Kitchen Kuu vegan kama-age udon.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Obon Shokudo

This all-vegan Japanese restaurant is a longtime staple in the Portland vegan community, thanks to its kenchinjiru ginger miso soup and countless onigiri made with house-made misos; however, the udon noodle bowls are equally enjoyable. Smooth, yet springy, the house-made udon pairs beautifully with Obon Shokudo’s curry, finished with shiitake dashi, fried tofu, and kakiage fritters. The restaurant also offers a lighter soy-mushroom broth, as well as gluten-free rice noodles.

A photo of the house-made udon noodle in a curry broth with fried tofu and kakiage fritters at Obon Shokudo
Obon Shokudo curry udon noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Kinboshi Ramen

Formerly known as Marukin, Kinboshi has been a ramen standby in Portland for several years. Even though it specializes in Hakata-style tonkotsu ramen, this Southeast Ankeny ramen-ya also offers two meatless broths — the creamy umami-rich miso and the lighter soy-milk-based shio tonyu — with the option of a spicy version of each one. Vegan toppings include tofu, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, and shichimi chile. The shop also carries pan-fried gyoza with spinach wrappers and Japanese curry, as well as a stunning cold hazelnut hiyashi ramen during the warmer months.

A photo of the vegan shio tonyu red ramen with a soy milk based broth and assortment of vegetables
Kinboshi vegan shio tonyu red ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Afuri

Tokyo-based ramen shop Afuri chose to open its first US location in Portland because the soft water from Mount Hood, much like Mount Afuri’s water, is ideal for making ramen noodles. Although the shop specializes in citrusy yuzu ramen, the savory-spicy hazelnut tantanmen is one of the most memorable bowls in town, and it happens to be vegan. Made with umami-rich miso tare, this bowl arrives with bouncy, thick noodles, topped with bok choy, shiitakes, leeks, miso cashew crumbles, and sesame chile oil. Snacks like seaweed salad and crispy eggplant buns make good starters before diving into this next-level bowl.

A photo of Afuri’s vegan hazelnut tantan ramen with bok choy, shiitakes, miso cashew crumbles
Afuri vegan hazelnut tantan ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Xinh Xinh Vietnamese Bistro

Portland vegans and vegetarians flock to this casual Vietnamese bistro in Southeast Portland for steamy noodle bowls, like the simple-but-tasty pho chay. A major highlight of the menu, the vegan hue (bun bo chay) comes with thick rice noodles, large pieces of spongy tofu, and fresh vegetables with a savory-spicy broth. Xinh Xinh has several other vegan dishes, such as tofu-mushroom banh mi, barbecue “pork” rice plates, and spring rolls with peanut sauce.

A photo of Xinh Xinh’s vegan bun bo chay noodle soup with tofu and vegetables
Xinh Xinh bun bo chay noodle soup.
Xinh Xinh

Jade Rabbit

While Jade Rabbit is best known as Portland’s only fully vegan restaurant, serving handmade dim sum like rabbit-shaped bawan dumplings and faux pork-stuffed char siu bao, the restaurant has always carried a noodle bowl that easily steals the limelight. Served in a large ceramic bowl, the Fiery Wind noodle soup comes with a soul-soothing Lan Zhou broth that’s slow-cooked with 13 herbs, including star anise, ginger, and Sichuan peppercorn. Delicate and slippery wide rice noodles, three-year fermented soy protein chicken, and crunchy yu choy offer a range of satisfying textures, while the medicinal broth, dotted with chile oil, delivers a spiciness that gradually sneaks up on you.

A photo of Jade Rabbit’s Fiery Wind noodle soup accompanied with turnip cakes, chile oil wontons, and a cocktail at The Emerald Room
Jade Rabbit Fiery Wind noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Kati

Outfitted with rustic wood and marquee lettering, this vegetarian restaurant on Division Street is a hot spot for Thai dishes like pad see ew, Panang curry, and pineapple fried rice. Tom yum soup lovers won’t want to miss the restaurant’s version of sukhothai noodle soup — it marries the iconic spicy-zingy broth with rice noodles, crushed peanuts, bean sprouts, and crispy fried wonton wrappers. To pair with this tangy noodle dish, the vegan Thai iced tea with a creamy coconut base is a great choice.

A photo of Kati’s vegan sukho Thai tom yum noodle soup with tofu, bean sprouts, peanuts, and crispy wontons
Kati sukho Thai tom yum noodle soup.
Kati

Thơm

At this tiny Alberta street cafe and mini market, the simple menu of homey Vietnamese dishes includes a vegan pho that’s worth venturing across town for. Thơm’s pho chay relies on an aromatic broth that’s robust and deeply satisfying, despite the lack of animal products. Diners may have to work their way through the bowl, chock full of Ota tofu, mushrooms, and bok choy, before there’s room to add in Thai basil, bean sprouts, and sliced chiles.

A photo the vegan pho at Thom, accompanied by a plate of vegetables, sriracha, and hoisin
Thom pho chay.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Norah

A favorite among the vegan community, this Pan Asian restaurant on Belmont made a name for itself with memorable dishes like cauliflower curry and coconut mushroom linguine. The wonton noodle soup arrives with a tangle of bouncy vegan egg noodles, bathing in a veggie-mushroom broth accented by star anise. The wontons’ delicate wrappers hold savory-meaty parcels of king oyster mushrooms, while other toppings like five spice-braised tofu and crunchy bok choy are just as enjoyable. Those looking to warm up on a chilly day can try Norah’s volcano noodle soup, with vegetable tempura and glass noodles in a mala broth.

A photo of Norah’s vegan wonton noodle soup with mushroom wontons, five spice braised tofu, bok choy, and cilantro.
Wonton noodle soup at Norah.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Nudi Noodle Place

At this whimsical and forest-like pan-Asian restaurant in Woodstock, the go-to order is the fragrant Malaysian-style laksa featuring a rich and soothing curry coconut broth and rice noodles topped with a mountain of vegetables and tofu chunks. Those who prefer a lighter broth can opt for the vegetable-heavy green noodle soup. Nudi’s noodle bowls make a hearty entree, but hungrier diners can also enjoy vegan samosas and roasted cauliflower with toasted coconut.

A photo of vegan laksa at Nudi Noodle Place.
Nudi Noodle Place vegan laksa.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Baka Umai

At Baka Umai on Hawthorne, vegans and vegetarians will find shiitake-vegetable broths and toppings like spicy cabbage, fried tofu, and candied jalapenos. The shop is known for its distinct offerings, like the smoky-spicy-savory soy chorizo ramen with pickled daikon and cilantro, but ramen traditionalists can slurp shoyu and miso ramen here, too. Those looking to crank up the heat can try broths tinged with ghost pepper chile oil or fermented habaneros. Other entrees include mazemen brothless ramen, tsukemen dipping ramen, and bento bowls.

A photo of the vegan ramen at Baka Umai, topped with soy chorizo, cabbage, daikon, and cilantro
Baka Umai soy chorizo ramen.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

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Van Hanh

A mainstay in Portland’s vegan food community, this house-turned-restaurant on Division serves an impressive selection of vegan Vietnamese dishes, from rice pancakes to vermicelli bowls. In addition to soothing bowls of pho, noodle soup lovers can enjoy bun rieu with vegan ham in a bright tomato broth or the popular spicy bun hue with thick rice noodles and mock beef. Van Hanh’s menu also offers an opportunity for diners to explore Vietnamese mock meats, like tofu-seaweed fish filets and ham rolls made of bean curd sheets.

A photo of Van Hanh’s bun hue noodle soup with thick rice noodles, tofu, mock beef, and vegetables
Van Hanh bun hue noodle soup.
Waz Wu/Eater Portland

Related Maps