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Mural of the Woodstock neighborhood in front of a picnic table and park bench
Woodstock mural
Nathan Williams

Where to Eat and Drink in Portland’s Woodstock Neighborhood

Dive into the comfort cuisine of one of Portland’s most undersung neighborhoods

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Woodstock mural
| Nathan Williams

Portland’s laid-back Woodstock may be, in fact, named after a now-obscure Walter Scott novel and not the legendary rock festival, but the spirit of ’69 manages to abide here regardless. Its residents are a mix of retirees, Reed students past and present, and young families in this still-somewhat-affordable section of town. The culinary main drag is a stretch of Southeast Woodstock Boulevard between Cesar Chavez and 52nd, with a Bi-Mart and a New Seasons — old Portland and new — kitty corner from each other at the center. That bridging of old and new is reflected in the neighborhood’s restaurants, bars, and cafes, which range from tried-and-true specialty markets to up-and-coming food carts and coffee shops.

Day-trippers will find the quiet, walkable neighborhood flanked by the large Woodstock and Brentwood Parks on one side, and the Reed campus and Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden on the other; any of the above would serve as fine spots to dive into takeout.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Woodstock Café

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Every Portland neighborhood needs its anchor coffee shop, and the 2021 arrival Woodstock Cafe is auditioning to fill that role. Owner Katherine Harris founded Upper Left Roasters, and the spacious, bright Woodstock Café brews the local roaster’s beans exclusively. The expected espresso drinks are supplemented by a small-but-polished tea list, along with the cafe’s golden milk, a bracing concoction with cinnamon, black pepper, ginger, and turmeric. The food menu includes bagels from Henry Higgins and vegan Shoofly muffins.

Keeper Coffee Co

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Tucked into the northwestern-most corner of the neighborhood, Keeper Coffee is a popular third place for Reed College students and remote workers. The cafe sports inviting cottagecore vibes and makes cortados and macchiatos with single-origin Coava beans. For extra sustenance, order a pastry — like a raspberry-rosemary scone or a slice of orange olive oil cake — from the tempting display or a jar of house-made granola to go.

Otto's Sausage Kitchen & Meat Market

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A favorite of one Woodstock resident who happens to be Oregon’s senior senator, Otto’s has been serving grilled links and deli sandwiches in Woodstock for a century. Otto’s offers a few simple veggie sandwiches, but the house-cured meats are the name of the game here. The menu boasts a wide range of salamis and liverwurst, corned and roast beef; the Otto’s team grills hot dogs and links outside in front of the store in almost any weather. Beverage options include a range of sodas and juices, along with a small selection of beer and wine. Patio seating can fill up at lunchtime when the weather is nice, so visitors should be prepared to order to-go.

A hot dog and a pork link in buns, with mustard and onions.
Hot dog and pork link at Otto’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chick & Pig Thai Street Food

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Thai food is a crowded lane in Portland, but Thai cart Chick & Pig has become a serious draw since opening in the fall of 2021. Chick & Pig largely eschews noodle-based dishes for salads abundant with green papaya, mushrooms, and tofu, as well as skewers of fried or barbecued meat, like moo ping and kai tod. This is the ideal spot for heat-seekers; the spice level here skews higher than many other Thai restaurants in town. The cart currently operates in a Shell parking lot, so seating is limited.

Nudi Noodle Place

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Nudi’s eclectic menu opens with snacks like tempura-fried pickles and garlic frog legs and boasts a wide swath of noodle dishes that include Thai boat noodles, duck ramen, japchae, and laksa. It’s a neighborhood standby, using seasonal produce for its menu and offering a kid’s menu for families.

A photo of vegan laksa at Nudi Noodle Place.
Vegan laksa at Nudi.
Waz Wu / Eater Portland

Portland Fish Market

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When it comes to fish and chips, fish markets often hit the top of the power rankings, considering their access to fresh seafood. That freshness comes with varying availability and prices as seasons come and go, but Portland Fish Market typically offers a wide variety of “and chips” options; the menu includes Pacific Northwestern staples like salmon, as well as relative rarities like fried oysters. Those looking for a beverage pairing can opt for bottles of Topo Chico, canned beer, or wine. Fish and chips are served from a window on the side of the building, with online ordering available.

Portland Fish Market sign and mural.
Portland Fish Market.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Papaccino's

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An eclectic Woodstock staple since 1989, it would be all too easy for Papaccino’s to coast on vibes. But the baristas at this neighborhood stalwart take their coffee seriously; using beans from Seattle’s Caffe D’arte, they know how to churn out drinks quickly during a rush, and when to spend a little extra effort on presentation during a sleepy afternoon. Outside of coffee, Papaccino’s offers draft beers, a small wine list, and a Woodstock-famous cereal bar — hard to find in other Portland cafes. The spacious coffeeshop is ideal for lingering with a good book, with outdoor seating on both Southeast Woodstock and 42nd.

An array of breakfast cereal dispensers at the the Papaccino’s cereal bar
Cereal bar at Papaccino’s
Nathan Williams

Viking Soul Food

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The longtime Scandinavian food cart has sailed over to Woodstock, opening a second location in a hole-in-the-wall along the neighborhood’s main strip. As with the original cart, the restaurant serves Viking Soul Food’s famous lefse wraps, stuffed with Norwegian meatballs or smoked salmon. But here, diners will also find expanded offerings, including specials like seafood chowder and a small market section with Scandinavian goods such as lingonberry thumbprint cookies, rye loaves, and bottles of house-made beet hot sauce.

Cloud City Ice Cream

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A neighborhood wouldn’t be quite complete without a local ice cream parlor, and Woodstock’s scoops top-notch ice cream while avoiding destination status for tourists — in other words, fewer lines and more ice cream. Cloud City packs house-made waffle cones with generous scoops of classic and classic-adjacent flavors, such as cookies & cream, bourbon vanilla, and honey lavender. Non-dairy folks will enjoy the up to eight mostly coconut milk-based vegan flavors.

Delta Cafe

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Reedies have been rolling through Delta Cafe for decades, stopping in for hush puppies and fried chicken, or hangover brunches of smoked brisket hash or biscuits and gravy. The ’90s-funky decor adds serious charm, and the restaurant’s happy hour — which offers a daily rotating cocktail — is a tradition within the neighborhood.

The storefront at Delta Cafe.
Delta Cafe.
Delta Cafe

Lutz Tavern

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Lutz Tavern is the sort of old-school Portland bar cool enough to inspire the nation’s PBR renaissance, comfortable in its skin enough to religiously offer the Trail Blazers on TV, no matter how far out of playoff contention they might fall. Close enough to Reed College to draw a few students on most nights, at its heart Lutz is a low-key neighborhood pub for all ages. The kitchen turns out a solid burger, along with simple salads, sandwiches, and chili until close at 2:30 a.m. The tap list is small but mighty and usually includes at least one cider. Plus, pinball lovers will find favorites like Medieval Madness and Monster Bash.

Shoko Sushi

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More is more at Shoko Sushi, which serves hearty portions from a wide-ranging menu anchored by sushi but also featuring ramen, teriyaki, tonkatsu, and Korean dishes like bulgogi and bibimbap. The bento combos offer a mix of cooked dishes and sushi, alongside rice, salad, and the chef’s choice of the day. The wood-heavy décor is homey and inviting, and with a kids menu and mochi ice cream for dessert, Shoko is a solid choice for families.

Proper Pint Taproom

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Proper Pint offers a thoughtful tap list featuring a savvy balance of IPAs, porters, sours, ciders, and wine. Most beers are available in the U.S. standard 16-ounce pour as well as a U.K. imperial, or “proper” pint of 20 ounces. Well-behaved dogs are welcome in the taproom, and an honest-to-goodness pizza hotline phone hangs on the wall to summon a tavern-style pie from Bridge City Pizza down the street. If the bar’s relatively modest indoor space is full, visitors can try the ample heated patio out back.

From its name, Toast might sound like a too-precious “New American” restaurant of the Portlandia era; instead, however, it’s more of a down-to-earth — but not uncreative — neighborhood café. Breakfast and brunch are the main attractions, rich with savory haymakers like the pork-belly-and-fried-egg Golden Pig as well as a decadent French toast topped with orange-vanilla whipped cream. Locals come for the extended afternoon happy hour, which might feature specials like tender, gamey lamb burgers or creamy, nutty Gruyere mac and cheese. The $5 happy hour gin and tonic is hard to beat.

A fried pork chop topped with a fried egg, avocado, and chopped fresh tomato
The Golden Pig at Toast
Toast

Bridge City Pizza

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Outside of the Midwest, Chicago is best known for a pizza so deep it needs a lifeguard; locals often prefer a thin, crispy, square-cut tavern style that is Bridge City’s specialty. Nevertheless, Bridge City is more than just a pizzeria, serving a knockout Chicago-style Italian beef sandwich — thinly-sliced beef on a French roll under a pile of sweet peppers, served with au jus. Another under-the-radar hit: The shop’s super gooey mozzarella sticks are made in-house, as opposed to landing in a fryer out of a freezer bag.

A thin square-cut pizza topped with peppers, olives, and mushrooms.
Tavern style pizza from Bridge City.
Bridge City Pizza

Bergerac Bistro

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Fitting for laid-back Woodstock, the cozy Bergerac approaches French fare in a relaxed, far-from-intimidating way. Drawing on the casual-but-hearty bistro cuisine of his childhood in Dordogne — a cool, wet region of western France (sound familiar?) — chef Joris Barbaray offers a highly seasonal, prix fixe menu. Sea or land proteins lead most entrees, but Bergerac offers at least one vegetarian option. The wine list is almost completely French, but those uncertain with unfamiliar vintages can opt for a chef’s wine pairing. And, yes, escargot is available.

A fish dish surrounded by a circle of green sauce on a white plate
Seafood at Bergerac
Bergerac Bistro

Woodstock Café

Every Portland neighborhood needs its anchor coffee shop, and the 2021 arrival Woodstock Cafe is auditioning to fill that role. Owner Katherine Harris founded Upper Left Roasters, and the spacious, bright Woodstock Café brews the local roaster’s beans exclusively. The expected espresso drinks are supplemented by a small-but-polished tea list, along with the cafe’s golden milk, a bracing concoction with cinnamon, black pepper, ginger, and turmeric. The food menu includes bagels from Henry Higgins and vegan Shoofly muffins.

Keeper Coffee Co

Tucked into the northwestern-most corner of the neighborhood, Keeper Coffee is a popular third place for Reed College students and remote workers. The cafe sports inviting cottagecore vibes and makes cortados and macchiatos with single-origin Coava beans. For extra sustenance, order a pastry — like a raspberry-rosemary scone or a slice of orange olive oil cake — from the tempting display or a jar of house-made granola to go.

Otto's Sausage Kitchen & Meat Market

A favorite of one Woodstock resident who happens to be Oregon’s senior senator, Otto’s has been serving grilled links and deli sandwiches in Woodstock for a century. Otto’s offers a few simple veggie sandwiches, but the house-cured meats are the name of the game here. The menu boasts a wide range of salamis and liverwurst, corned and roast beef; the Otto’s team grills hot dogs and links outside in front of the store in almost any weather. Beverage options include a range of sodas and juices, along with a small selection of beer and wine. Patio seating can fill up at lunchtime when the weather is nice, so visitors should be prepared to order to-go.

A hot dog and a pork link in buns, with mustard and onions.
Hot dog and pork link at Otto’s.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Chick & Pig Thai Street Food

Thai food is a crowded lane in Portland, but Thai cart Chick & Pig has become a serious draw since opening in the fall of 2021. Chick & Pig largely eschews noodle-based dishes for salads abundant with green papaya, mushrooms, and tofu, as well as skewers of fried or barbecued meat, like moo ping and kai tod. This is the ideal spot for heat-seekers; the spice level here skews higher than many other Thai restaurants in town. The cart currently operates in a Shell parking lot, so seating is limited.

Nudi Noodle Place

Nudi’s eclectic menu opens with snacks like tempura-fried pickles and garlic frog legs and boasts a wide swath of noodle dishes that include Thai boat noodles, duck ramen, japchae, and laksa. It’s a neighborhood standby, using seasonal produce for its menu and offering a kid’s menu for families.

A photo of vegan laksa at Nudi Noodle Place.
Vegan laksa at Nudi.
Waz Wu / Eater Portland

Portland Fish Market

When it comes to fish and chips, fish markets often hit the top of the power rankings, considering their access to fresh seafood. That freshness comes with varying availability and prices as seasons come and go, but Portland Fish Market typically offers a wide variety of “and chips” options; the menu includes Pacific Northwestern staples like salmon, as well as relative rarities like fried oysters. Those looking for a beverage pairing can opt for bottles of Topo Chico, canned beer, or wine. Fish and chips are served from a window on the side of the building, with online ordering available.

Portland Fish Market sign and mural.
Portland Fish Market.
Nathan Williams/Eater Portland

Papaccino's

An eclectic Woodstock staple since 1989, it would be all too easy for Papaccino’s to coast on vibes. But the baristas at this neighborhood stalwart take their coffee seriously; using beans from Seattle’s Caffe D’arte, they know how to churn out drinks quickly during a rush, and when to spend a little extra effort on presentation during a sleepy afternoon. Outside of coffee, Papaccino’s offers draft beers, a small wine list, and a Woodstock-famous cereal bar — hard to find in other Portland cafes. The spacious coffeeshop is ideal for lingering with a good book, with outdoor seating on both Southeast Woodstock and 42nd.

An array of breakfast cereal dispensers at the the Papaccino’s cereal bar
Cereal bar at Papaccino’s
Nathan Williams

Viking Soul Food

The longtime Scandinavian food cart has sailed over to Woodstock, opening a second location in a hole-in-the-wall along the neighborhood’s main strip. As with the original cart, the restaurant serves Viking Soul Food’s famous lefse wraps, stuffed with Norwegian meatballs or smoked salmon. But here, diners will also find expanded offerings, including specials like seafood chowder and a small market section with Scandinavian goods such as lingonberry thumbprint cookies, rye loaves, and bottles of house-made beet hot sauce.

Cloud City Ice Cream

A neighborhood wouldn’t be quite complete without a local ice cream parlor, and Woodstock’s scoops top-notch ice cream while avoiding destination status for tourists — in other words, fewer lines and more ice cream. Cloud City packs house-made waffle cones with generous scoops of classic and classic-adjacent flavors, such as cookies & cream, bourbon vanilla, and honey lavender. Non-dairy folks will enjoy the up to eight mostly coconut milk-based vegan flavors.

Delta Cafe

Reedies have been rolling through Delta Cafe for decades, stopping in for hush puppies and fried chicken, or hangover brunches of smoked brisket hash or biscuits and gravy. The ’90s-funky decor adds serious charm, and the restaurant’s happy hour — which offers a daily rotating cocktail — is a tradition within the neighborhood.

The storefront at Delta Cafe.
Delta Cafe.
Delta Cafe

Lutz Tavern

Lutz Tavern is the sort of old-school Portland bar cool enough to inspire the nation’s PBR renaissance, comfortable in its skin enough to religiously offer the Trail Blazers on TV, no matter how far out of playoff contention they might fall. Close enough to Reed College to draw a few students on most nights, at its heart Lutz is a low-key neighborhood pub for all ages. The kitchen turns out a solid burger, along with simple salads, sandwiches, and chili until close at 2:30 a.m. The tap list is small but mighty and usually includes at least one cider. Plus, pinball lovers will find favorites like Medieval Madness and Monster Bash.

Shoko Sushi

More is more at Shoko Sushi, which serves hearty portions from a wide-ranging menu anchored by sushi but also featuring ramen, teriyaki, tonkatsu, and Korean dishes like bulgogi and bibimbap. The bento combos offer a mix of cooked dishes and sushi, alongside rice, salad, and the chef’s choice of the day. The wood-heavy décor is homey and inviting, and with a kids menu and mochi ice cream for dessert, Shoko is a solid choice for families.

Proper Pint Taproom

Proper Pint offers a thoughtful tap list featuring a savvy balance of IPAs, porters, sours, ciders, and wine. Most beers are available in the U.S. standard 16-ounce pour as well as a U.K. imperial, or “proper” pint of 20 ounces. Well-behaved dogs are welcome in the taproom, and an honest-to-goodness pizza hotline phone hangs on the wall to summon a tavern-style pie from Bridge City Pizza down the street. If the bar’s relatively modest indoor space is full, visitors can try the ample heated patio out back.

Toast

From its name, Toast might sound like a too-precious “New American” restaurant of the Portlandia era; instead, however, it’s more of a down-to-earth — but not uncreative — neighborhood café. Breakfast and brunch are the main attractions, rich with savory haymakers like the pork-belly-and-fried-egg Golden Pig as well as a decadent French toast topped with orange-vanilla whipped cream. Locals come for the extended afternoon happy hour, which might feature specials like tender, gamey lamb burgers or creamy, nutty Gruyere mac and cheese. The $5 happy hour gin and tonic is hard to beat.

A fried pork chop topped with a fried egg, avocado, and chopped fresh tomato
The Golden Pig at Toast
Toast

Bridge City Pizza

Outside of the Midwest, Chicago is best known for a pizza so deep it needs a lifeguard; locals often prefer a thin, crispy, square-cut tavern style that is Bridge City’s specialty. Nevertheless, Bridge City is more than just a pizzeria, serving a knockout Chicago-style Italian beef sandwich — thinly-sliced beef on a French roll under a pile of sweet peppers, served with au jus. Another under-the-radar hit: The shop’s super gooey mozzarella sticks are made in-house, as opposed to landing in a fryer out of a freezer bag.

A thin square-cut pizza topped with peppers, olives, and mushrooms.
Tavern style pizza from Bridge City.
Bridge City Pizza

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Bergerac Bistro

Fitting for laid-back Woodstock, the cozy Bergerac approaches French fare in a relaxed, far-from-intimidating way. Drawing on the casual-but-hearty bistro cuisine of his childhood in Dordogne — a cool, wet region of western France (sound familiar?) — chef Joris Barbaray offers a highly seasonal, prix fixe menu. Sea or land proteins lead most entrees, but Bergerac offers at least one vegetarian option. The wine list is almost completely French, but those uncertain with unfamiliar vintages can opt for a chef’s wine pairing. And, yes, escargot is available.

A fish dish surrounded by a circle of green sauce on a white plate
Seafood at Bergerac
Bergerac Bistro

Related Maps